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18 February 2006. Survey of Coaching Development in Leinster. Brendan Harpur Chair, Subcommittee on Review of Coach Development. Sub-committee on Review of Coach Development. Sub-committee are undertaking this review: Pat Henderson (Kilkenny) Sean Dempsey (Laois) Paddy Christie (Dublin)

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18 february 2006
18 February 2006

Survey of Coaching Development in Leinster

Brendan Harpur

Chair, Subcommittee on Review of Coach Development

sub committee on review of coach development
Sub-committee on Review of Coach Development

Sub-committee are undertaking this review:

  • Pat Henderson (Kilkenny)
  • Sean Dempsey (Laois)
  • Paddy Christie (Dublin)
  • Sean Kelly (Meath)
  • Noel Delaney (Leinster Coaching Director)
  • Lester Ryan (Leinster Coaching Director)
  • Brendan Harpur (Dublin)
content of presentation
Content of Presentation
  • Profile of Respondents
  • Overall and Comparisons of Survey Results
    • Coaching Staff
    • Foundation Course – Issues and Content Needs
    • Accessibility of Information and Uptake on Best Practice Course
    • Knowledge Transfer and Support Levels
    • Level 1 Course – Issues and Content Needs
    • Handball Results
  • Key Findings Going Forward
slide4

Key Issues to be addressed

  • 1. Code of Best Practice
  • 2. Need for an Introductory course
  • on coaching.
  • 3. Need Foundation participants to see an actual
  • Coaching Session in Action
  • 4.The need to support Foundation participants at
  • Club level.
  • 5. The need to improve support to local schools by
  • Clubs.
key issues to be addressed
Key issues to be addressed

6. The need to implement a Level 1 course for Juvenile coaches only

7. How to improve the coaching of key skills in Hurling and football. (Tackling/Evasion/Scoring)

8. How to address the Rules of the Game at Introductory, Foundation and Level 1

9. How to put in place the necessary resources for coach Tutors to deliver their courses

10. How to maintain and improve the Tutoring skills of Tutors

profile of respondents
Profile of Respondents
  • Number of Respondents
    • 138 Respondents, representing approximately 559 people
  • Number of clubs and schools
    • 65% Clubs or 90 Clubs; 28% Schools or 39 Schools; 7% unknown or 9 unknown
  • Coaching Roles of Respondents (N = 138)
    • 82% in an active coaching role
  • Attendees at the convened meetings
    • This included: School Liaison Officers, Club chairmen/persons, Executive Committee members, Voluntary team mentors, Adult Games chairmen/persons, Club officers, and Juvenile Committee members

Other views included

82 Level 1 course participants

27 Foundation tutors

11 Level 1 tutors

78 County players(36 football/36 Hurling/6 dual )

2 1 coaching staff totals and percentages of males and females
2.1 Coaching Staff – Totals and Percentages of Males and Females
  • The vast majority of coaches are male. Roughly ≥95% for Football and Hurling.
  • On average, there are 9 active Football current Juvenile coaches per Club and 3 per school.
  • There are 8 per Club and 3 per School for Hurling;
  • There are 4 per Handball Club and 2 per School.
  • There are consistently fewer female coaches, especially for Football and Hurling Clubs and Schools.
  • The percentage female coaches is highest for Schools versus Clubs and Handball compared to other sports.
2 2 the course on code of best practice for youth sport
2.2 The course on "Code of Best Practice for youth sport?
  • About 27% of the respondents say that all of their Club Juvenile /School coaches have undertaken the course on “Code of Best Practice for Youth Sport”.
  • 11% indicate that a course is planned for their coaches.
  • About 63% either ‘don’t know’ or indicate that none of their coaches have undertaken this course.
  • Far too many either ‘don’t know’ or report low take up of this important course.
2 3 2 5 2 8 courses a log book and receipt of certificates
2.3 – 2.5 & 2.8 Courses, a log book and receipt of certificates
  • More coaches have completed the Foundation versus the Level 1 course.
  • On average per Club / School, 6 Football and 4 Hurling coaches have completed the Foundation, and 2 and 2 respectively, the Level 1 course.
  • An average of 2 Juvenile coaches per Club / School have completed the log book & received a certificate.
  • An average of 2.5 adult coaches per Club / School have completed the Foundation course and 1 for the Level 1 course.
2 6 2 7 reasons for inactivity among coaches
2.6 – 2.7 Reasons for Inactivity among Coaches
  • “Other Commitment” and “Own children no longer involved” appear to be the top reasons for a coach’s inactivity over time.
  • Perhaps increasing the levels of commitment and personal satisfaction gained from coaching are among the key drivers for sustaining activity levels among coaches who have completed the Foundation and Level 1 courses.
3 1 3 2 parents and key topics for shorten version of foundation course
3.1 – 3.2 Parents and Key Topics for Shorten Version of Foundation Course
  • According to the respondents, the Top 5 key topics for such a course should include the shaded items in the table.
  • A solid majority of the respondents (65.7%) believe that parents (who are not intending to become active coaches) should have a shorter version of the Foundation course.
3 3 3 5 foundation course
3.3 - 3.5 Foundation Course
  • Both Clubs / Schools agree that the Foundation course should be primarily aimed at ‘Those who wish to become active in coaching teams’ (41% and 50% respectively) and ‘Parents and Coaches’ (45% and 47% respectively)
  • 100% of clubs / schools would favour the Foundation course to consist of the following parts:
    • Part 1: An appreciation of coaching for Parents / Mentors / Coaches, and
    • Part 2: Emphasis on the practical aspects of coaching for Active Coaches.
  • Over 54% of the Clubs indicated that a “Theory Session followed by practical” and that “Seeing a Coaching session in operation” were both essential methods of delivery for the Foundation course.
  • The Schools agreed at 49% in both cases. None of the other methods exceeded this percentage for the schools.
  • 77% of the Clubs and 83% of the Schools felt that if the Foundation course content was increased, they would be prepared to attend for 9 hours rather than 12 hours.
3 7 assessment and accessibility of information 4 1 4 2
3.7 Assessment and Accessibility of Information (4.1 / 4.2)
  • Clubs and Schools prefer that coaches participating on a Foundation course should be assessed by means of ‘undertaking practice supervised by the Tutor during the course’.
  • Both also agree that information on the Foundation courses in their counties are ‘readily available’ (71% for Clubs and 85% for Schools).
  • Both also agree that information on the Level 1 course in their counties is ‘readily available’ (68% for Clubs and 82% for Schools).
  • However, improvements are needed as Clubs also indicate that in some instances information on the Foundation (21%) and on Level 1 courses (27%) is not readily available.
slide18
4.3 – 4.5 Special Workshops (Topics listed under Clubs, Schools and Football and Hurling according to % interest)

School - Football

Clubs - Football

Schools - Football

Clubs – Football & Hurling

Clubs – Football & Hurling

Schools – Football & Hurling

Drills to improve football skills, 69%

Tackling skills in Gaelic Football, 59%

Kicking or Possession, 54%

Go Games Workshop, 44%

Tackling skills in Gaelic Football, 71%

Drills to improve football skills, 68%

Go Games Workshop, 56%

Kicking or Possession, 54%

Fundamentals of Agility, Coordination and Balance, 60%

Physical conditioning, 59%

First Aid, 57%

Young Referees course, 51%

Fundamentals of Agility, Coordination and Balance, 51%

Physical conditioning, 41%

First Aid, 49%

Young Referees course, 46%

Hurling Advanced Skills, 59%

Indoor Hurling Drills, 51%

Go Games Workshop, 46%

Wall Ball activities, 41%

Schools - Hurling

Clubs - Hurling

Hurling Advanced Skills, 36%

Indoor Hurling Drills, 36%

Go Games Workshop, 36%

  • Only workshop topics showing higher interest levels (≥40%) are listed here.
  • Special workshops which provide for skills acquisition, conditioning, and drills seem to be the most desirable for coaches.
5 1 5 2 knowledge transfer and support levels
5.1 – 5.2 Knowledge Transfer and Support Levels
  • From your experience, what percentage of Foundation course participants apply their learning from the course to actual teams:
    • 39% of Clubs indicate ‘25% to 50%’ and 24% say ‘>50% to 74%’
    • 37% of Schools indicate ‘25% to 50%’ and 37% say ‘>50% to 74%’
  • What difficulties do Foundation participants encounter in applying their learning to actual Teams or Groups:
5 3 evidence showing that juvenile coaches made a difference
5.3 Evidence showing that Juvenile coaches made a difference
  • What evidence to you have that Juvenile coaches, who have completed coaching courses, have made a difference to your Club/ School players
full time coaches
Full time Coaches
  • Very little support is provided by the full time Employed Club Coach to the Club / School according to the respondents’ feedback.
  • Only 14% of Clubs and 15% of Schools say that the coach provides advice and guidance to the Club / school’s juvenile coaches
  • 13% of both Clubs and Schools says that the coach ‘coaches juvenile teams.
  • In fact both report that the coach spends <50% of actually coaching players (56% of Clubs and 57% of Schools report this.)
  • 29% of Schools and 28% of Clubs says that the full time Employed Club Coach spends 50% to 74% of time actually coaching players
5 5 problems coaches encounter with schools
5.5 Problems Coaches Encounter with Schools
  • Very few Clubs are Schools reported that full time employed Club Coaches entered problems when working with schools.
  • Other than possible problems regarding ‘no obvious follow up on coaching from teachers,’ and the ‘lack of interest from teachers’, the following graph shows that the vast majority (≥80%) report few problems encountered.
5 7 skills or aspects of game presenting the greatest difficulties in developing players
5.7 Skills or Aspects of Game Presenting the Greatest Difficulties in Developing Players
  • The greatest difficulty is with tacking, evasive, and scoring skills.
county players views
County Players views

Most neglected in modern coaching

  • FootballHurling
  • No.1 Tackling Hooking
  • No.2 Blocking Frees/ Sidelines
  • No.3 Kicking Blocking
  • No.4 Pick- up Catching
5 8 5 9 level of support to schools
5.8 – 5.9 Level of Support to Schools
  • Coaching support from Clubs to Schools
    • 91% of the Clubs describe the level of support the Club gives to local schools in relation to coaching Football as "moderate to high." Only 43% of the schools report the same.
    • 77% of the Clubs describe the level of support the Club gives to local schools in relation to coaching Hurling as "moderate to high." Only 36% of the schools report the same.
    • Rather 64% report mixed or minimal to no support.
slide27
5.10 Most Important IssuesWhat are the most important issues for local schools in relations to coaching Football and Hurling?
  • Issues were identified based on whether >20% of the respondents ticked each items as a issue.
  • For Clubs, most of the issues involve Football within the primary schools. This includes the "Need for a coach from the Club", "Need for Mentors / Team Managers to assist at matches", and "Coaching courses for teachers". These also were consistently mentioned across Football and Hurling as well as the "Need for a coach from the Club", "Coaching courses for teachers“, and “Coaching Equipment” being mentioned for Secondary Schools.
slide28
5.10 Most Important IssuesWhat are the most important issues for local schools in relation to coaching Football and Hurling?
  • Issues were identified based on whether >20% of the respondents ticked each items as a issue.
  • For Clubs, most of the issues involve Football within the primary schools.
  • This includes the "Need for a coach from the Club", "Need for Mentors / Team Managers to assist at matches", and "Coaching courses for teachers".
  • These also were consistently mentioned across Football and Hurling as well as the "Need for a coach from the Club", "Coaching courses for teachers“, and “Coaching Equipment” being mentioned for Secondary Schools.
6 1 content and issues for level 1 course
6.1 – Content and Issues for Level 1 Course
  • The priorities for Clubs and Schools in the Level 1 Course involve:
    • Techniques
    • Fitness
    • Planning the Programme
    • Drills
    • Tactical Decision Making
6 2 6 4 testing for level 1 and intermediate course elements
6.2 – 6.4 Testing for Level 1 and Intermediate Course Elements
  • 84% of Clubs and 82% of Schools agree that a Level 1 Coach should successfully complete a Test on the Playing Rules before being certified.
  • Considerably fewer Clubs and Schools see a need for some form of Intermediate course between Foundation and Level 1 for Active Coaches:
    • 51% of Clubs say “Yes”, 30% “No” and 19% neutral on this matter
    • 33% of Schools say “Yes”, 30% “No” and 37% neutral on this matter
  • Those that say “Yes” consider the following the key elements of such a course:
  • See the illustration on the next page.
slide32

6.4 Intermediate Course – Key ElementsWhat would you consider to be the key elements of an Intermediate Course between Foundation and Level 1 courses

Clubs, Rank 1

Schools, Rank 1

6 5 do you agree that the steps in coach development should consist of 5 steps
6.5 Do you agree that the Steps in Coach Development should consist of 5 Steps

Your Feedback

An appreciation of coaching for parents / coaches / teachers (98% Clubs; 96% Schools)

Agreement

on Steps

to Coach Development

5 Step Plan

Fully supported

Step 1

Practical aspects of coaching for active coaches (97% Clubs; 100% Schools)

Fully supported

Step 2

An intermediate level between the foundation and Level 1 courses for active coaches or as identified in ‘key elements’ (65% Clubs & Schools)

Majority Support

Step 3

“Level 1” Course designed for juvenile coaches only (75% Clubs; 82% Schools)

Majority Support

Step 4

The current “Level 1” course but only for coaches involved with adult teams (69% Clubs; 67% Schools)

Majority

Supported

Step 5

6 6 overall and specific assessments of the level 1 course
6.6 Overall and Specific Assessments of the Level 1 Course
  • General consensus is high levels of satisfactory to excellent experience with the Level 1 course.
6 7 6 9 details of level 1 course
6.7 – 6.9 Details of Level 1 Course
  • The pace of the level 1 course is reported by both Clubs (92%) and Schools (88%) to be ‘about right.’
  • Not more than 6% said that it was ‘too advanced’ (Schools and Clubs at 6%) or ‘too elementary (Schools at 6%; Clubs at 2%)
  • On average, about 20 to 22 participant coaches attend the Level 1 course. Over 60% of Clubs (63%) and Schools (71%) believe that these numbers are ‘just right’ considering the course objectives.
  • The general consensus seems to be that about 25 to 50 participants are ‘too many’, 12 is some cases is ‘too few’, and between 15 and 20 are generally considered to be ‘just right.’
changes recommended by participants
Changes Recommended by participants
  • No.1 Shorter / more concise
  • No.2 Less repeating
  • No.3 Standardise Handouts
  • No.4 Focus on Juvenile or Adult coaching
  • No.5 More examples of sessions/drills
  • No.6 Minimum requirements for participants
7 1 7 2 handball issues and content needs
7.1 – 7.2 Handball Issues and Content Needs
  • Compared with Clubs, Schools more often report Handball to be an active sport. For example, 37% (10 of 27) of Schools indicate that it is an active sport , only 8% (5 of 60) of the responding Clubs say this. Thus 92% of Clubs and 63% of the Schools do not have Handball as an active sport.
  • Of these, 46% (26 of 56) of the Clubs and 44% (8 of 18) of the Schools say ‘yes’ they would like to see Handball promoted in their Club or School. Also, 43% of Clubs and 44% of Schools responded with ‘maybe in the future’ they would like to see it promoted.
7 3 7 7 handball issues and content needs
7.3 – 7.7 Handball Issues and Content Needs
  • The active juvenile members are between 16 and 23 coaches, of which roughly 10 are males and 10 are females for clubs.
  • For schools the active juvenile members average between 13 and 31, of which roughly 15 are males and 10 are females.
  • The active playing adult members for clubs are an average between 10 and 18, of which roughly 8 are male and 13 are female.
  • The active playing adult members for Schools are an average of 4 with the majority being male. No data was submitted on numbers of females playing Handball for Schools.
  • The Clubs estimate that nearly 4 adults per club would be interested in undertaking a coaching course for handball coaches. The schools reported an interest of one per responding school. Nine clubs responded to this question and 7 schools responded.
  • In terms of facilities available, both Clubs and Schools says they either have no facilities (52% and 56% respectively) or that they do not have a handball alley or suitable indoor or outdoor walls. An average of 97% of Clubs and 94% of Schools indicated that these facilities were not available at their Clubs or Schools.
county players comments
County Players comments
  • Q.2 What you remember most about best underage coach
  • No.1 Good at skills and drills
  • No.2 Always encouraged
  • No.3 Good instruction
  • No.4 Treated everyone the same
  • No.5 Passion for game
  • No.6 Organised and well prepared
  • Q.3 What you remember most about least effective coach
  • No.1 Bad language/ Shouting
  • No.2 Poor drills
  • No.3 Too much physical
  • No.4 Bad organisation
  • No.5 Bad communication
10 key issues
10 Key Issues

1. Ensuring that all coaches have undertaken the Code of Best Practice and that all Foundation tutors can deliver this module.

2. The need to design and implement an Introductory course on coaching aimed at parents, would be mentors and coaches.

3. Providing an opportunity for Foundation participants to see an actual Coaching Session in Action

4. The need to support Foundation participants to implement initial sessions at Club level.

5. The need to improve support to local schools by Clubs.

0 key issues
!0 Key Issues

6.The need to implement a Level 1 course for Juvenile coaches only.

7.How to improve the coaching of key skills in Hurling and football. (Tackling/Evasion/Scoring)

8. How to address the Rules of the Game at Introductory, Foundation and Level 1

9. How to put in place the necessary resources for coach Tutors to deliver their courses

10. How to maintain and improve the Tutoring skills of Tutors

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