Project Design and Management – Day Three
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Project Design and Management – Day Three ANDREA D É RI VERONICA VANN LEAD INTERNATIONA L. Damascus, Syrian Arab Republic 25-29 June 2006. DAY 1 Introduction to Project Design & Management DAY 2 Understanding the Key Elements of Project Design DAY 3 Developing a Concept Note

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Project Design and Management – Day Three

ANDREA DÉRI

VERONICA VANN

LEAD INTERNATIONAL

Damascus, Syrian Arab Republic

25-29 June 2006


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DAY 1 Introduction to Project Design & Management

DAY 2 Understanding the Key Elements of Project Design

DAY 3 Developing a Concept Note

DAY 4 Developing a Full Proposal

DAY 5 Improving Project Management / Delivery Skills

Day 3


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SESSION 11 Concept Note

Coffee Break

SESSION 12 Concept Note Case Studies

SESSION 13 Drafting Your Concept Note

Lunch

SESSION 14 Drafting Your Concept Note (cont.)

Coffee Break

SESSION 15 Sharing your Concept Note

SESSION 16 From Concept Note to Full Proposal

Day 3 Schedule


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By the end of Day 3 you will

be able to discuss what a concept note is and why you need it for

have drafted a concept note for your own project

be able to explain the difference between a concept note and a full project proposal

Day 3 Objectives


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S E S S I O N 11

Concept Note

Project Design and Management


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Written outline of your project idea (2-3 pages)

Many donors require a project concept for a first evaluation before inviting you to submit a full project application

Various templates used e.g. DFIDhttp://www.dfid.gov.uk/funding/dafguidelines0507.asp#Substance or http://www.dfid.gov.uk/funding/daf-guidelines-0607.pdf

Project Concept Note


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(1)

Section A: About the applicant (1 page)

Section B: About the project (2 pages)

(2)

Supplements

Organisational deed, rules about your organisation, the purpose, how it is governed and managed.

Annual accounts of the last 12 month; signed by Treasurer, on behalf of Board of Directors.

Concept Note Sections (DFID)


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Section A: Information About The Applicant

Name and address (including contact details: telephone, fax, e-mail) of applicant

Name and position of main contact person

What are the vision, mission and values of your organisation?

When was your organisation established and how many people are employed by it?

What are your main sources of funding?

What prior contact, if any, including funding, have you had with DFID? If yes, which part of DFID?

Please provide details of any previous application(s) to the Development Fund (DFID).

Concept Note Section A (DFIF)


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Section B: Information About The Project

Project title

Timescale of the project including start and completion dates.

Brief summary of the main idea, including the main activities and what the project hopes to achieve.

Background to why the proposed project is necessary.

How the project relates to DFID development strategy.

How the project fits with the aims of the fund.

Monitoring and evaluation plans.

How the project will achieve sustainability.

Who else will contribute funds to the project.

Concept Note Section B (DFIF)


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Project proponents (name, brief description)

Partners (name, brief description, contribution)

Project context (rationale, problem statement)

Main goal and objectives

Scope and scale of the proposed project

Outline of potential outcomes and impact

Budget estimate

Timeframe

Concept Note should include – in general


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1. Name of project proponents…

and description of how they have indicated their support

2. Brief description of partners

Areas of expertise, reasons for their interest in and support of the project

3. Project context

How did the project originate?

Concept note should include – details: 1-3


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4. Main goal and objectives of the project

Refer to objectives definition and logical framework

Explain why project is the best option for addressing the situation

5. Description of the scope and scale of the project

How many participants

Who are the beneficiaries (refer to stakeholders)

Potential impact of project on local populations

Size of geographical area covered

6. Outline of potential outcomes and impact of the project

Outline: How will project change the situation?

Impact: Effect that will continue beyond timeframe of the project/region

Concept note should include – details: 4-6


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7. Estimate of the cost of the project

Cost range most appropriate to your project based on real costs assessment

8. Timeframe for the project

Planned length and starting date

Concept note should include – details: 7-8


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Two lines

1st line: Short, snappy, easy to remember

2nd line: Longer, descriptive, more technical

E.g.

‘Gone fishing!’

Restoration of fisheries in Lake Manzala, Egypt

Good Title


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Enhanced resources

Complementary resources

Networking

Outreach

Political reasons

Strategy

Co-finance

Why Work in Partnership?


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The objectives of collaboration must be clearly defined, written down, and communicated to all the participants (this is called the partnership agreement, operating principles or memorandum of understanding).

The mission statement of the collaborative enterprise should contain both short-term and long-term objectives.

How Keep in Mind… How to work in Partnership?


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There has to be a clearly established benefit for every participating institution (or organisation).

The smaller the initial group of participants, the greater the likelihood of success.

There must be a champion of the enterprise in every participating institution – a senior person with the time, commitment, and authority to see the project through to completion.  The more senior in rank the better.  There must also be staff who have the expertise as well as a clearly defined authority to make the project work. These people must trust each other.

Keep in mind ….


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Each partner should be required to contribute some resource to the endeavour.  Ritual declarations of a desire to collaborate are not enough.

Be prepared to invest extra time in obtaining support, building trust and getting the work done

Keep in mind …


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S E S S I O N 12

Concept Note Case Studies

Project Design and Management


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One was successful, the other was not

For your assessment:

(1) Use the key elements of concept notes

(2) Check out the donor guidelines

www.tripleline.com

http://www.darwin.gov.uk

Analysis of Two Concept Notes


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S E S S I O N 13 - 14

Drafting Your Concept Note

Project Design and Management


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S E S S I O N 15

Sharing a Concept Note

– Peer Feedback

Project Design and Management


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What we will do -

Presentation, analysis and discussion of the draft concept notes to get ideas on how to improve your concept notes

Sharing your Concept Note


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Description of the project context

Main goal and objectives

Scope and scale of the proposed project

Outline of potential outcomes and impacts

Project proponents - brief description

Partners - brief description

Cost estimate

Timeframe

Outline of a Concept Note


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S E S S I O N 16

From Concept Note to Full Proposal

Project Design and Management


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What we will do in this session

Difference between a concept note and a full proposal

Introduction to the information needed and steps to be taken to turn a concept note into a full proposal

Review of real life proposals - Analysis of successful and unsuccessful proposals: case studies

From concept note to full proposal


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Description of the project concept context

Summary of the main goal and objectives of the project

Description of the scope and scale of the proposed project

Outline of the potential outcomes and impact of the project

Name and brief description of project proponents

Brief description of partners

Estimate of the cost of the project

Timeframe for the project

From concept note to full proposal –Review of concept note


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Basic information – about the organisation and the proposed project

Project overview or summary

Functions of the proposal - context or background to the issue/problem, project rationale, goal/s and objective/s

Staffing and organisational information - for proponents, partners, stakeholders

Methodology - strategies; project activities and timeframe

Project budget - expense budget; budget revenue; co-financing (matching funding)

Project results – outputs, outcome, impact

Conditions and risks

Monitoring and evaluation

Link to organisational and funding goals

Project personnel

From concept note to full proposal – Components of a full proposal



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The results section of a project proposal answers the question: what will happen as a result of this project?

It is sometimes broken down into project outputs, project outcomes and project impact.

Some New Terms - Results


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Project Outputs question: what will happen as a result of this project?

The outputs are the short-term, or immediate results of the project, and the easiest results to formulate. They indicate whether the partners successfully achieved each objective.

Project Outcome

The outcome of the project addresses how the outputs are expected to change the situation the project addresses. The outcome of the project is therefore reflected in the project goal.

Results – Outcomes


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Project Impact question: what will happen as a result of this project?

The impact of the project refers to the broader development, research or policy implications that result from the project. For example, how might the project influence policy formulation and implementation? How might it impact development processes at the local, national and regional levels? How might it affect the sustainability of the local economy over the longer term? Could the results be used in other settings? What contribution could they make to existing technical and scientific knowledge?

Results - Impact


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In the Lake Manzala case study, the question: what will happen as a result of this project?output was the engineered wetland, the outcome was cleaner water in the lake and the impactwas the increased economic benefits for the people living around the lake.

Results - Outputs, Outcomes and Impact


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Both are external to the project team (that are not directly under the control of the project team)

Conditions/assumptions - conditions that are necessary for the project activities to take place, and for them to achieve their intended goals. These conditions should be immediately relevant to the project and fall within the project's scope.

Risks - Known factors that may have an impact on the project

Conditions and risks


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Can you tell us briefly what a concept note is and why you need it for?

Have you drafted a concept note for your own project?

Can you explain the difference between a concept note and a full project proposal?

Reflection


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