Smoking Kills
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Smoking Kills







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Smoking Kills. Content. Smoking Why people start to smoke? Why people continue smoking? Bad news for smokers How do cigarettes damage health? Health risks of smoking Why quit smoking? How to quit smoking? The good news for smoker who quit Ban on smoking in Brunei Darussalam. Smoking.
Smoking Kills

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Slide 2

Smoking Kills

Slide 3

Content

  • Smoking

  • Why people start to smoke?

  • Why people continue smoking?

  • Bad news for smokers

  • How do cigarettes damage health?

  • Health risks of smoking

  • Why quit smoking?

  • How to quit smoking?

  • The good news for smoker who quit

  • Ban on smoking in Brunei Darussalam

Slide 4

Smoking

  • Tobacco smoking is the single most preventable cause of ill health and death. It is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, cancer and a variety of other diseases and conditions. It is responsible for around 80% of all lung cancer deaths and 20% of all cancer deaths (smoking has been linked to cancers of the mouth, bladder, kidney, stomach and cervix, among others).

  • Smokers are also at increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and reduced lung function and smoking in pregnancy increases the risk of health problems for both mother and child. Tobacco use has been linked to a variety of other conditions, such as diabetes, peptic ulcers, some vision problems, and back pain.

Slide 5

Why people start to smoke?

Most smokers start smoking when they are teenagers.

People started smoking because:

  • their friends smoked.

  • they thought smoking was the 'grown up' thing to do.

  • their heroes smoked including many sports stars.

  • tobacco advertising in films, magazines, TV, sports and posters showed smoking as being cool, sexy, smart, tough and the adult thing to do.

  • smoking was allowed in public places everywhere.

  • people could buy cigarettes in smaller packets of 5 or 10 .

  • most people didn't know that smoking was bad for their health and for the health of people who were around smokers.

Slide 6

Why people continue smoking?

People who continue smoking give different reasons for smoking.

  • "It keeps me alert when I have a lot of work to do."

  • "It helps me to concentrate."

  • "It keeps me calm when I am under pressure."

  • "It makes me feel relaxed.“

    As soon as people become regular smokers they become addicted to the

    nicotine in the cigarettes which makes them want to continue smoking.

    There are around 4000 chemicals in cigarette smoke.

    Some of these chemicals affect the brain making the person feel alert

    or calm, in other words changing the person's mood.

    The more people smoke, the more they feel the need to smoke.

Slide 7

The bad news for smokers

People who smoke have to put up with a lot of bad things to continue their smoking.

  • Their hair, clothes and breath smell of stale smoke.

  • Teeth and fingers go yellow.

  • Skin looks unhealthy and grey.

  • Their sense of smell and taste are affected.

  • They are ten times more likely to get heart disease, lung disease, a major heart attack or stroke.

  • In many countries laws have been made so that there are few places left where they can smoke in public. It is now illegal in South Australia for people to smoke in cars if there are children in the car too.

  • Smokers are a minority group in countries like Australia.

  • People have been educated to know the dangers of smoking and passive smoking (when you don't smoke but you are breathing someone else's smoke).

  • Cigarettes cost a lot of money which could be used for other healthier things.

Slide 9

How do cigarettes damage health?

Cigarettes contain more than 4000 chemical compounds and at least 400 toxic substances.

When you inhale, a cigarette burns at 700°C at the tip and around 60°C in the core. This heat breaks

down the tobacco to produce various toxins.

As a cigarette burns, the residues are concentrated towards the butt.

The products that are most damaging are:

  • tar, a carcinogen (substance that causes cancer)

  • nicotine is addictive and increases cholesterol levels in your body

  • carbon monoxide reduces oxygen in the body

  • components of the gas and particulate phases cause chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD).

    The damage caused by smoking is influenced by:

  • the number of cigarettes smoked

  • whether the cigarette has a filter

  • how the tobacco has been prepared.

Slide 10

What's in regular tobacco cigarette?ARE YOU SCARED YET?Say NO to SMOKING Now !!!

Radon

Radioactive Gas

Cadmium

Batteries

Stearic Acid

Candle wax

Butane

Lighter Fluid

Toluene

Industrial Solvent

Nicotine

insecticide

Hexamine

Barbecue lighter

Ammonia

Toilet Cleaner

Acetic Acid

Vinegar

Carbon Monoxide

Poisonous gas from exhaust Fume

Methane

Sewer Gas

Tar

Road surfaces

Arsenic

Poison

Acetone

Nail Varnish Remover

Methanol

Rocket Fuel

Slide 11

Interactive Tool

This tool shows just how leathal tobacco is on a world-wide level.

Slide 13

Health Risks of Smoking

Here are some possible health effects of smoking:

  • Lung cancer

  • Cancer of the mouth, lip, throat and voice box

  • Cancer of the pancreas

  • Breast cancer

  • Cervical cancer

  • Stomach cancer

  • Liver cancer

  • Kidney cancer

  • Bladder cancer

  • Leukemia

  • Coronary heart disease (e.g., heart attacks)

  • Circulatory problems

  • High blood pressure

  • High cholesterol (LDL)

  • Pneumonia

  • Influenza (the "flu“)

    Second-hand smoke causes most of the serious health listed above, and more.

  • The common cold

  • Peptic ulcers

  • Harmful effects on Bones and JointsChronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis)

  • Tooth decay (cavities)

  • Heart Dieases

  • Bad Breath

  • Gum disease

  • Depression

  • Snoring

  • diabetes

  • Osteoporosis

  • Thyroid Disease

  • Infertility on men and women

  • Sleep problems

  • Cataracts

Slide 16

Why Quit Smoking?

Because the benefits begin IMMEDIATELY.

Quitting smoking is the single best thing you can do to improve your health and quality of life. Non-smokers have a much lower risk of getting dozens of smoking-related diseases like lung cancer, heart disease, and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, including emphysema).

Here are some other good things that happen to your body once you stop smoking:

Slide 18

How to quit smoking

Most people find it hard to quit smoking. Quitting can be hard, but it’s not impossible. Many people like you have quit smoking. You

can too. Counseling, medications, and other supports can help you quit.

If you’ve tried quitting smoking before but couldn’t do it, try again. Each time you try, it will get easier. You will be one step closer to

quitting for good.

Choose two or more proven quit-smoking methods

There are many proven ways to quit smoking. To boost your chances of quitting, choose more than one method. Pick what seems right

for you. Each person is different. You'll know what will work best for you.

Proven quit smoking methods:

  • Join a support group for people trying to quit. Research shows that people in quit-smoking support groups are more likely to quit for good. (Find out about quit smoking support groups in your area).

  • Get individual counseling in person or by phone. You can get counseling in person or over the phone, through a free smoker’s quitline. Both are proven to help people quit. If you prefer to see someone in person, ask your doctor or quitline staff to recommend a counselor. The cost of counseling may be covered by your workplace or extended health plan, if you've got one.

  • Take nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). The nicotine patch, gum, lozenge or inhaler replaces some of the nicotine you usually get from cigarettes. This can make nicotine withdrawal easier to manage.

  • Ask your doctor about a prescription medicine called bupropion. It’s an antidepressant that can make it easier to quit.

  • Ask your doctor about a prescription medicine called vareniclinetartrate. It can take away some of your craving to smoke, and make smoking less enjoyable.

  • If you slip up, don’t give up. Try again, and again... keep trying until you've quit for good.

  • Ask for support from your family and friends.

    Now is the best time to quit. It’s never too late.

Slide 19

The good news for smokers who quit!

There are many other good reasons to quit smoking:

  • taste and smell improves.

  • skin improves.

  • Fitness improves.

  • Lungs begin to repair themselves and start getting rid of all the gunk that has been clogging them up.

  • they can stay inside with their friends and family instead of being outside, alone, smoking.

  • You'll set a good example for your children

  • Your smoking will no longer affect the health of people around you

  • You'll have more money to save or to spend on other things - a pack of cigarettes a day adds up to more than $3,000 a year!

  • You'll have more energy to do the things you love

  • Cigarettes will no longer control your life

    "Giving up smoking is not easy for the smoker or their families and friends. Nowadays everyone knows that

    smoking is bad for health so look after your body and if you never start smoking you will never have to know

    how hard it is to stop.“

    What are your reasons to quit smoking? Write them down and share them with friends and family or

    Post them on the fridge.

Slide 21

WHO urged governments to require that all tabacco packages to include pictorial warning pasting disgusting pictures of the effects of smoking over packs of cigarettes.

The idea is to deter people from smoking by showing them the rotting teeth and horrific tumors suffered by longtime smokers.

Slide 23

Bans on smoking

  • Bans on smoking in public places have already been introduced in parts of the United States and Canada, Thailand, and Southern Australia. Recently, Ireland became the first country in the world to outlaw cigarettes in all its restaurant and pubs.

  • The enforcement of the Tobacco Act 2005 and the Tobacco Regulations 2007 on the 1st of June 2008 was introduced to protect public health from diseases linked to smoking or cigarette smoke. All buildings used for commercial, industrial and recreational purposes as well as public areas such as restaurants and cafes are designated as non-smoking areas.  The prohibition includes areas inside the restaurant or cafe and its open areas. 

  • Under the rules and regulations, smoking has been prohibited in all government buildings since Sept 1, 1994; there are prohibitions for cigarettes to enter the country without health warning (Custom Act 1991); prohibitions to smoke on all RBA flights since April 1, 1998; increase of tobacco taxation by 200 per cent since Dec 1, 1994; voluntary banning of tobacco advertisements by Radio Television Brunei (RTB) since 1976; and more recently, prohibitions to smoke in all schools since Jan 1, 2002.

  • Apart from displaying no smoking notices, the managements of the premises are also required to request their customers to immediately refrain from smoking within the specified areas.  Meanwhile, convenience store vendors have also started displaying notices prohibiting smoking and sales to those under 18 years of age.  Any vendors found guilty of selling tobacco products to those under the stated age, faces fines of not more than B$5,000 and B$10,000 thereafter for every subsequent offence.  Public areas such as bus stations and ATM machines as well as public transportation such as buses and taxis are also designated as non-smoking areas.  

  • According to a 2001 statistical study, 80. per cent of the 40,000 smokers in Brunei are between the ages of 20

    and 34, whereas17.5 per cent make up those above the age of 15. Worldwide, four million deaths every year

    are ascribed to smoking-related illnesses, which amounts to 10,000 deaths a day.

  • "This matter should be taken seriously and put a stop to once and for all by eateries as second hand smoke would

    affect the health of other customers.

Slide 24

Useful links for Brunei Smoker

Ministry of Health - Negara Brunei Darussalam

3 Jun 2008 ... The ATAT which will be like an 'A-Team' will scrutinise and patrol the premises against any miscreants who violate the current anti-smoking...www.moh.gov.bn/news/20080603a.htm

Teen smoking gateway to drug abuse

news.brunei.fm/2010/03/14/teen-smoking-gateway-to-drug-abuse

Brudirect.com - News Updates

3 Apr 2004 ... Hence, the issue of whether Brunei should follow in the footsteps of the Republic of Ireland and ban smoking in enclosed public places, ...www.brudirect.com/DailyInfo/News/Archive/Apr04/030404/bb04.htm

Does increasing the price of cigarettes help reduce smoking?

20 Mar 2010 ... The setting up of the legal framework and the establishment of the 'quit smoking' clinic in AnggerekDesa (that only gives out tobacco ...www.brunei-online.com/weekend/news/mar20h44.htm

http://www.moh.gov.bn/healthpromotions/healthtopics.htm

Slide 26

Quiz

  • 8. Within seconds of taking a puff, a person's blood pressure can

  • increase 10-20 points.

  • True

  • False

  • 9. Cigarettes contain no chemicals.

  • True

  • False

  • 10. Burning tobacco smoke produces carbon dioxide.

  • True

  • False

  • 11. Nicotine is addictive and is the only known psycho- active

  • ingredient in tobacco smoke.  

  • True

  • False

  • 11. How long does it take to realize some health benefits

  • from quitting smoking?

  • within 20 minutes .

  • at least 24 hours

  • more than two days

  • about a year

  • 12. Which of the following are signs you may addicted to nicotine?

  • the need to smoke every day .

  • having a cigarette soon after arising from sleep

  • unsuccessful attempts at quitting

  • all of the above

  •  1. Most smokers start the habit before age 18.

  • True

  • False

  • 2. Cancer is one of the most serious result of smoking.

  • True

  • False

  •  3. A smoker’s life expectancy is shorter to that of a non –smoker

  • by 10 years.

  • True

  • False

  •  4. Nicotine is an addictive component in cigarettes.

  • True

  • False

  • 5. Smoking relaxes a person and therefore has an anti-ageing effect.

  • True

  • False

  • 6. Smoker can lead to heart diseases.

  • True

  • False

  • 7. The benefits of giving up the smoke include-

  • a) The person begins to smell better

  • The person appears more relaxed

  • Skin begins to look better.

  • All

Slide 27

Quiz Answer

  • 8. Within seconds of taking a puff, a person's blood pressure

  • can increase 10-20 points.

  • True

  • False

  • 9. Cigarettes contain no chemicals.

  • True

  • False

  • 10. Burning tobacco smoke produces carbon dioxide.

  • True

  • False

  • 11. Nicotine is addictive and is the only known psycho- active

  • ingredient in tobacco smoke.  

  • True

  • False

  • 11. How long does it take to realize some health benefits

  • from quitting smoking?

  • within 20 minutes .

  • at least 24 hours

  • more than two days

  • about a year

  • 12. Which of the following are signs you may addicted to nicotine?

  • the need to smoke every day .

  • having a cigarette soon after arising from sleep

  • unsuccessful attempts at quitting

  • all of the above

  •  1. Most smokers start the habit before age 18.

  • True

  • False

  • 2. Cancer is one of the most serious result of smoking.

  • True

  • False

  •  3. A smoker’s life expectancy is shorter to that of a non -smoker by 10 years.

  • True

  • False

  •  4. Nicotine is an addictive component in cigarettes.

  • True

  • False

  • 5. Smoking relaxes a person and therefore has an anti-ageing effect.

  • True

  • False

  • 6. Smoker can lead to heart diseases.

  • True

  • False

  • 7. The benefits of giving up the smoke include-

  • The person begins to smell better

  • The person appears more relaxed

  • Skin begins to look better.

  • All


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