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Even in countries like Greece and France, traditionally protected through healthy diets and lifestyles ... Contains healthy eating advice, recipes and activity ideas ...

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Nutrition and Resources – an update Dr Sarah Schenker and Claire Theobald British Nutrition Foundation Nutrition: in the news everyday Metabolic Syndrome The new disease (also knows as Syndrome X) One in six Europeans Up to one in three in some European countries Even in countries like Greece and France, traditionally protected through healthy diets and lifestyles Diagnosed when a person has three of more of the following: abdominally obese high TG levels low HDL levels high blood pressure high fasting blood sugar levels What are we doing about it… …we have lots of policies! Saving Lives: Our Healthier Nation (England); Better Health: Better Wales; Towards a Healthier Scotland NHS Plan National Service Frameworks: NHS Cancer Plan Choosing Health White Paper Reform to Welfare Food Scheme Strategy for Sustainable Farming & Food House of Commons Health Committee report on Obesity FSA consultations CMO report on physical activity Healthy Living Blueprint Turning the Tables

Slide 5:Recommendations for dietary change at population level

Reduce fat to no more than 35% energy and saturates to no more than 10% energy Increase n-3 PUFAs to 0.2g/day Increase complex carbohydrates (50% energy) Reduce added sugars to no more than 10% energy Increase fibre intake to 18g/day Reduce salt to 6g/day No rise in dietary cholesterol Maintain a healthy body weight Increase fruit and vegetables by 50% to 5 or more portions/day Adults eating more than the average amount of red & processed meat (>140g per day) should consider a reduction

This applies to most people, including vegetarians and from all ethnic origins, except to children under the age of two years. The Balance of Good Health Eight Guidelines for a Healthy Diet The Balance of Good Health is based on the Government’s Eight Guidelines for a Healthy Diet: 1. Base your meals on starchy foods. 2. Eat lots of fruit and veg. 3. Eat more fish. 4. Cut down on saturated fat and sugar. 5. Try to eat less salt – no more than 6g a day. 6. Get active and try to be a healthy weight. 7. Drink plenty of water. 8. Don’t skip breakfast.

Slide 8:To meet these guidelines most people need to:

Bread, other cereals and potatoes: half as much again Fruit & vegetables: double the amount Milk & dairy foods: choose lower fat options Meat, fish & alternatives: choose leaner/low fat options Foods containing fat foods containing sugar: cut down

Slide 9:Recommendations for physical activity

Adults should aim for 30 minutes of moderate exercise at least 5 times a week All young people should participate in physical activity of at least moderate intensity for 1 hr/day Young people who do little activity should aim for at least half hr/day At least twice a week, some of these activities should help to enhance muscular strength and flexibility and bone health www.nutrition.org.uk

Slide 10:Review of recommended intakes - salt

This is A LOT of salt 1.25g salt or more per 100g (0.5g sodium or more per 100g) This is A LITTLE salt 0.25g salt or less per 100g (0.1g sodium or less per 100g) I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.

Slide 11:Stop, think, go?

March 2006 FSA recommended voluntary signpost labelling I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.

Slide 12:Stop, think, go?

The four core principles are: Provision of separate information on fat, sats, sugar and salt Use of red, amber or green colour indicating whether levels are high, medium or low Provision of information on the levels of nutrients per portion of a product Use of nutritional criteria developed by the FSA to determine the colour code I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.

Slide 13:Stop, think, go?

Low - established criteria for low in EU legislation on Nutrition and Health Claims, e.g. low fat = = 3g /100g High - = 25% of the GDA per 100g for women Separate criteria will apply for foods eaten in quantities greater than 250g (e.g. ready meals) High - = 30% The scheme will be applied to a limited range of foods: ready meals, breakfast cereals, sandwiches, pizzas, poultry, fish products, burgers, pies and sausages I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.

Slide 14:Folic acid fortification debate

The pros: Fortification of flour with folic acid could significantly reduce the number of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects in the UK The cons: However, if all flour is fortified with folic acid, this could make it harder to spot early symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency. This means that treatment is more likely to be delayed. In the UK, vitamin B12 deficiency, which can lead to irreversible nerve damage, is relatively common in older people aged 65 years and over. This is because it can become more difficult to absorb vitamin B12 as we get older. I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.I’ve provided an example of how a score can be calculated here. Using the table in your hand outs you can check that I have done my calculations correctly! Based on its energy and nutrient content, wholemeal bread would score 6 points, classifying it as an intermediate food. It is worth noting that white bread is also classified as an intermediate food. Nutritionists and dietitians encourage the consumption of wholegrain foods as they are a rich source of fibre.

Slide 15:Resource Update

Slide 16:New look Education News

Fresh look BNF Education News! FREE publication Once a term (3 times per year) Informs teachers about the educational activities of the Foundation Unfolds into a useful A2 colour poster Sign up today or online www.nutrition.org.uk

Slide 17:Food – a fact of life www.foodafactoflife.org.uk

Primary website – to help children learn about healthy eating and encourage practical food work Useful for secondary - SEN and less able Lots of resources – PowerPoints, recipes, worksheets, food cards, posters, interactive activities

Slide 18:More about Food – a fact of life

Divided into two age phases – 5-7 and 8-11 Key Facts – Key messages which provide a progressive approach to learning about healthy eating Teachers’ guides – lesson notes, details about the resources which support the Key Facts, objectives and curriculum links

Slide 19:Food Cards

World Food Cards x 10 8-11 - Key Fact 1 – Cards 3 Energy Cards x 16 8-11 – Key Fact 3 – Cards 5 Nutrient Cards x 20 8-11 – Key Fact 4 – Cards 6

Slide 20:Worksheets

What is it made from? 8-11 - Key Fact 2 - Worksheet 12 My Own BOGH 8-11 – Key Fact 2 - Worksheet 15 Energy Chart 8-11 – Key Fact 3 – Worksheet 20

Slide 21: PowerPoint Presentations

BOGH 8-11 – Key Fact 2 – PP 7 Energy 8-11 – Key Fact 3 – PP 8 Nutrients 8-11 – Key Fact 4 – PP 9

Slide 22:Posters

BOGH 8-11 – Key Fact 2 – Poster 1 Energy Posters 8-11 – Key Fact 3 – Posters 2 and 3

Slide 23: Interactive Activities

Slide 27:Active Kids Get Cooking Challenge

Previously Taste of Success Cooking competition – promotes cooking in school, along with healthy eating and can be completed as part of regular lessons or as a special event NEW - regional winners for Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland Prizes – cash, goody bags, a visit to London and a chance to meet Jamie Oliver Entry - maximum of 2 sides of A4 – recipe, photograph and reason for recipe choice Closing date 26 MAY 2006

Slide 28:Making Healthier Easier - mhe

Newsletter produced by BNF for Make Space youth clubs Contains – healthy eating advice, recipes and activity ideas Unfolds to become a bright A2 poster

Slide 29: Scottish conference dates

Friday 8th September – Inverness Saturday 9th September – Aberdeen Friday 15th September – Glasgow Saturday 16th September - Edinburgh

Thanks for listening! www.nutrition.org.uk
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