Groundwater Regulatory Program and Conjunctive Use Study

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AGENDA. Introduction of Lone Star Groundwater Conservation DistrictBackground of Study AuthorizationReview of the ProblemSummary of Study FindingsQuestions and Answers. Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District. Authorized by 77th Legislature in 2001 by HB 2362Geographic boundaries encompass ALL of Montgomery CountyCreation confirmed by popular vote on Nov 6, 2001 with 73.85 % approvalAmended Enabling Legislation in 2003 by SB 1930 to protect rulemaking authority.

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Groundwater Regulatory Program and Conjunctive Use Study

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1. Groundwater Regulatory Program and Conjunctive Use Study

2. AGENDA Introduction of Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District Background of Study Authorization Review of the Problem Summary of Study Findings Questions and Answers

3. Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District Authorized by 77th Legislature in 2001 by HB 2362 Geographic boundaries encompass ALL of Montgomery County Creation confirmed by popular vote on Nov 6, 2001 with 73.85 % approval Amended Enabling Legislation in 2003 by SB 1930 to protect rulemaking authority

4. Board Members Legislative Act provided for a nine-member Board of Board appointments are for staggered four-year terms,

5. Role of the Lone Star Groundwater District Conserve and Protect groundwater resources in Montgomery County Control land subsidence Develop rules and regulations as necessary to meet these objectives Establish well registration and permit system Work with Federal Government to monitor groundwater levels Participate in joint planning with GMA 14

6. Why is Planning and Regulation Necessary? Texas Water Development Board Projections of Available Groundwater in Montgomery County (per approved plan) 64,000 a-f /year Current GW Permit Requests 70,000 a-f/year Projected water demand by 2040 154,000 a-f /year Shortage 90,000 a-f/year

8. Groundwater Regulatory Program and Conjunctive Use Study

9. Study Background Authorization Authorized by Board action of February 20, 2004 Delayed until Planning Grant Application reviewed by TWDB ( April 2004) Notice to Proceed in June 2004

10. TWDB $141,000 LSGCD Cash $ 25,000 SJRA Cash $ 40,000 LSGCD In-Kind $ 70,000 SJRA In-Kind $ 25,000 Total $302,000 Cost Sharing and Obligation

11. Purpose and Scope Groundwater Regulatory Plan (GRP) Provides science and engineering justification for establishing management zones and goals for each zone Establishes a need for reduction in groundwater usage to meet goals Facilities Plan Technical mechanism for implementing the GRP Sets timetable for implementation of surface water ( or other alternatives) based on goals established in GRP

12. Groundwater Regulatory Plan Establishes population and water demand projections for next 40 years based on 5 year increments Apply water demand projections to the TWDB GAM Establishes goal for future water level declines Evaluates alternative scenarios of management zones Projects aquifer response based on scenario

13. Facilities Implementation Plan Interface with current planning, operating and management entities Develop sizes for plant, storage and conveyance facilities for surface water treatment and conveyance Establish preliminary routing and location of plants and pipelines Discuss TCEQ requirements for blending surface and groundwater sources Develop draft financial plan for implementing surface water Impact on water districts Current groundwater debt Rate and debt structure Review options for institutional mechanisms for implementing

14. REVIEW OF THE PROBLEM

15. Discussion of the Fundamental Issue Facing Montgomery County 26th fastest growing county in the United States 5th fastest growing county in Texas To date, entire water supply originates as groundwater from Gulf Coast Aquifer Current usage is approaching (exceeding) sustainable yield of the aquifer

16. Existing Sources of Water

17. Aquifer Characteristics

19. Historic Decline in Water Levels 1990-2004 Chicot Aquifer Water-Level Change

20. Historic Decline in Water Levels 1990-2004 Evangeline Aquifer Water-Level Change

21. Historic Decline in Water Levels 2000-2004 Jasper Aquifer Water-Level Change

22. Projected Decline in Water Levels (Evangeline 2000-2040)

23. Projected Decline in Water Levels (Jasper 2000-2040)

24. Regulatory Plan to Conserve Groundwater

25. Projections of Water Usage Texas Water Development Board Projections of Available Groundwater in Montgomery County (per approved plan) 64,000 a-f /year Current GW Permit Requests 70,000 a-f/year Projected water demand by 2040 154,000 a-f /year Shortage 90,000 a-f/year Note: 97% of the water used is for public water supply

28. Issues With Severe Water Level Decline Aquifer begins to dewater in areas of heavy pumpage. Potential problems include: Worsens conditions that contribute to land subsidence Water levels dropping below top of screen, reducing pump efficiency Reduced saturated thickness and availability Water quality degradation: arsenic, radioactivity, TDS

29. Groundwater Regulatory Program Development

30. What are the impacts of Regulating Groundwater Regulation is structured to encourage conservation. Conversion to alternative sources, including increased conservation, reclaimed water, surface water and other strategies will be necessary. The cost for water will likely rise.

31. What is a Regulatory Zone Accomplishing Authorized by enabling legislation and board rules as a method on management Establishes geographic boundaries and the allowable groundwater withdrawal within that boundary at a point in time. It sets periodic milestone dates for groundwater reduction. It provides for a continued “growth on groundwater” in the zone in between the milestone dates. It does not preclude subdividing the zone at some future date, but makes it difficult to move from one zone to another zone. It does not preclude changing the milestone dates, nor the amount of groundwater reduction within a zone at those milestone date.

32. Population/Demand Projections

33. Single Management Zone - Countywide

34. Conroe/Woodlands Management Zone

35. Two Management Zones

36. Three Management Zones

37. 4 Management Zones HUP – 5,463 af Allowable GW withdrawal – 20,185 af 2013 Demand – 11,046 af 2013 Reduction – 0% 2040 Demand – 19,325 af 2040 Reduction – 0%

38. Water Level Change in Evangeline Aquifer from 2000 to 2040 Baseline Run: Total Water Demand

39. Water Level Change in Evangeline Aquifer from 2000 to 2040 Reduction Scenario 2 : Four Zone Reduction

40. Water Level Change in Jasper Aquifer from 2000 to 2040 Baseline Run: Total Water Demand

41. Water Level Change in Jasper Aquifer from 2000 to 2040 Reduction Scenario 2 : Four Zone Reduction

42. Who is using the water?

43. Who should be regulated ? Types of users ? agriculture, irrigation, public, commercial, industrial Size of users ? small users, large users, single demand users, wholesale suppliers, retail suppliers Which of these users is causing the problem ? Is it necessary to capture all users or only 90% of them ( what is the cost of the last 10%) What would be the impact of regulation to the user group? Is it gaining a positive impact ? Is it punitive to the user group Do you regulate by owner or by well?

49. Wholesale Surface Water Supply

50. Planning aspects of the Surface Water System It will be a “wholesale” supply system that augments current retail systems It will be designed cost effectively, providing surface water to areas needing expansion or experiencing problems It will be designed to address the problems of over pumping

54. The Cost of Water Wholesale cost versus retail cost ( transmission versus distribution) Capital cost of a surface water system Operation and maintenance of the treatment plant, pumps and pipelines Capital cost of existing and new groundwater wells Operation and maintenance of the wells, storage facilities and pumps Cost of the lost opportunity to use an existing investment Cost of the distribution of water within the retail system

56. 2013 Surface Water System Costs Pipeline $ 56.4 $ 77.5 Treatment $ 38.6 $ 38.6 Special Crossings $ 17.2 $ 29.5 Total Construction $ 112.2 $ 145.6 Engineering and Contingencies $ 35.6 $ 45.6 Land Acquisition $ 8.8 $ 8.8 Total Cost $ 156.6 $ 199.9

57. Unit Rate of Surface Water Supply 50% Value of Un-depreciated Asset * $ 18 $ 18 Water System Cost $ 156.6 $199.9 Total Cost $ 174.6 $217.9 Annual Cost ** $ 14.0 $ 17.5 Annual SW Treated 6,570 mg 6,570 mg Surface Water Cost / 1000g $ 2.13 $ 2.66 for water actually used Less savings for GW pumping ($ 0.40) ($ 0.40) Plus O&M for SW operation $0.26 $ 0.26 Total Cost of Water $ 1.99 $2.52 for SW actually used

58. Other Cost Options

59. System Implementation

60. CONSIDERATIONS IN PLAN IMPLEMENTATION To be successful, the plan MUST have some level of support from the stakeholders involved To Implement, the Plan must include An incentive to conserve water An incentive to use an alternative source A financially equitable solution Someone to build the system Someone to administer the system and contractually obligate buyers and sellers of water

62. Comparison of Management Authorities

63. Current Status

64. Current Status Presentations made to 20+ water utilities in Montgomery County. Draft report submitted to TWDB and comments received. Following receipt of comments tonight, a final report will be submitted to TWDB Board of Directors will authorize development of Regulatory Plan requirements. Decisions need to be made on management/implementation strategy.

65. FOR MORE INFORMATION Kathy Turner Jones General Manager Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District PO Box 2467 207 W Phillips Street, Suite 300 Conroe, Texas 77305 936/494-3436 A copy of the Final Report and this presentation will be available on the District’s website: www.lonestargcd.org

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