Cpet 355
Download
1 / 42

CPET 355 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 181 Views
  • Uploaded on

CPET 355 . 16. Internetworking, Addressing, and Routing Paul I-Hai Lin, Professor Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology Purdue University, Fort Wayne Campus. Network Layer - an Overview. Getting data packets from the source all the way to the destination

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'CPET 355' - Rita


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Cpet 355
CPET 355

16.

Internetworking, Addressing, and Routing

Paul I-Hai Lin, Professor

Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology

Purdue University, Fort Wayne Campus

Prof. Paul Lin


Network layer an overview
Network Layer - an Overview

  • Getting data packets from the source all the way to the destination

  • Dealing with end-to-end transmission

  • Need to know

    • Topology of the communication subnet (routers)

    • Chose paths (routing algorithms)

Prof. Paul Lin


Position of network layer
Position of Network Layer

Courtesy - From Fig. 1, Page 467, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Network layer duties
Network Layer Duties

Courtesy - From Fig. 2, Page 468, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Network layer topics of discussion
Network LayerTopics of Discussion

  • Network Layer Design Issue

    • Services to the TCP Layer

      • Connectionless Services (Datagram)

      • Connection-Oriented Services (Virtual Circuit)

    • Subnets

  • Internetworking

  • Addressing

  • Routing

Prof. Paul Lin


Internetworks
Internetworks

  • Host A -> Host D

  • 4 LANS, 1 WAN

  • S1, S2, S3: Switch or Router

  • f1, f2: Interface

  • Three links: S1 -> S2 -> s3

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.1, Page 471, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Links in an internetwork
Links in an Internetwork

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.2, Page 472, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Network layer in an internetwork
Network Layer in an Internetwork

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.3 Page 473, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Network layer at the source
Network Layer at the Source

  • Creating Source and Destination Address, Fragmentation

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.4 Page 473, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Network layer at router or switch
Network Layer at Router or Switch

  • Routing Table, Fragmentation

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.5 Page 474, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Network layer at destination
Network Layer at Destination

  • Corrupted packet, Fragments

Courtesy - From Fig. 196 Page 475, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Quality of service requirements
Quality of ServiceRequirements

From Fig. 5-30, Page 397, Computer Networks, 4th edition, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Prentice Hall

Prof. Paul Lin


Packet switched network internet
Packet-Switched Network - Internet

  • Packets – Variable Length Data Blocks; Node to Node Delivery

  • Virtual Circuit – WAN, Frame Relaying, ATM applications, call setup a single route

Courtesy - From Fig. 196 Page 475, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Packet switched network internet1
Packet-Switched Network - Internet

  • Datagram Approach – no fixed path, routing, out of order

  • Packets == Datagrams

Courtesy - From Fig. 196 Page 475, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Addressing
Addressing

  • Internet Address – IP Address

    • Classful addressing – original architecture

      • Class A, B, C, D, and E

    • Classless addressing – mid 1990s

  • IPv4

    • 32-bit binary number

    • Dotted-Decimal Notation

      128.11.3.31

      255.255.255.0

  • IPv6 - 128-bit

Prof. Paul Lin


Addressing ipv4
Addressing – IPV4

  • Network ID, Host ID

  • Class A – 128 blocks (First Byte), 16,777,216 hosts

  • Class B – 16,384 blocks (First & Second Byte), 65536 hosts

  • Class C – 2,097,152 blocks (First, Second, Third byte), 256 hosts

  • Class D – 1 block, Multicasting

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.10 Page 479, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Finding the class
Finding the Class

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.12 Page 480, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Netid and hostid
Netid and Hostid

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.13 Page 481, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Classes and blocks netid 73
Classes and Blocks - Netid 73

128 Blocks; 16,777,216 Hosts

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.14 Page 482, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Blocks in class b network
Blocks in Class B Network

16384 Blocks; 65536 Hosts

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.15 Page 483, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Blocks in class c network
Blocks in Class C Network

2,097,152 Blocks; 255 Hosts

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.16 Page 484, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Network address
Network Address

  • An address defines a network with all host-id = 0

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.17 Page 484, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Sample internet
Sample Internet

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.18 Page 486, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Subnetting
Subnetting

  • Class B – 1 block, 65536 hosts (16-bit)

  • Subnets

    • 2 sub-blocks (1-bit), 36768 hosts (15-bit)

    • 4 sub-blocks (2-bit), 18384 hosts (14-bit)

    • 128 sub-blocks (7-bit), 512 host (9-bit)

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.19 Page 487, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Subnetting 3 level hierarchy
Subnetting – 3 Level Hierarchy

  • Three levels: Site, Subnet, Host

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.20 Page 487, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


A network with and without subnetting
A Network With and Without Subnetting

Courtesy - From Fig. 19.21 Page 488, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Masks
Masks

Courtesy - From Table 19.1 Page 489, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Supernetting
Supernetting

  • An organization can combine several class C block to form a larger range of addresses

Prof. Paul Lin


Classless addressing
Classless Addressing

  • Variable-Length Block (2, 4, 128, etc)

  • Mask

  • Finding the Network Address

  • Subnetting

  • CIDR (Classes InterDomain Routing)

Prof. Paul Lin


Dynamic address configuration
Dynamic Address Configuration

  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)

    • Database 1 (static) - Physical addresses to IP addresses

    • Database 2 (dynamic) – Available IP, Lease Time

Prof. Paul Lin


Network address translation
Network Address Translation

  • Internally, a large set of addresses

  • Externally, one address, or a small set of addresses

Courtesy – Table 19.2 Page 494, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


A nat example
A NAT Example

  • Private address: 172.18.0.0 to 172.18.255.255

  • NAT Router address: 200.24.5.8

Courtesy – Fig 19.25 Page 495, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Address translation
Address Translation

  • Private address: 172.18.0.0 to 172.18.255.255

  • NAT Router address: 200.24.5.8

Courtesy – Fig. 19.25 Page 495, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Address translation cont
Address Translation (cont.)

Courtesy – Fig. 19.25 Page 495, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Translation table
Translation Table

Courtesy – Table 19.3 Page 497, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Routing techniques
Routing Techniques

  • Routing Tables

  • Next-Hop Routing

  • Network-Specific Routing

  • Host-Specific Routing

  • Default Routing

Prof. Paul Lin


Translation table1
Translation Table

Courtesy – Fig. 19.27 Page 496, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Next hop routing
Next-Hop Routing

Courtesy – Fig. 19.28 Page 498, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Network specific routing
Network-Specific Routing

Courtesy – Fig. 19.29 Page 498, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Host specific routing
Host-Specific Routing

Courtesy – Fig. 19.30 Page 499, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


Default routing
Default Routing

Courtesy – Fig. 19.31 Page 500, Data Communications and Networks, 3rd edition, Forouzan, McGrawHill

Prof. Paul Lin


More on routing
More on Routing

  • Static vs Dynamic

    • Static Routing Table

    • Dynamic Routing Table and Protocols

      • RIP – Routing Information Protocol

      • OSPF – Open Shortest Path First

      • BGF – Border Gateway Protocol

  • Routing Tables

    • For Classful Addressing

    • For Classless Addressing (CIDR)

Prof. Paul Lin


ad