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Farms. A unit for 2nd grade. by Amita Plantz. Table of Contents. ______________________________________________. American Heritage Slides 3-6 People in Societies Slides 7-9 World Interactions Slides 10-12 Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities Slides 13-16

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Farms

A unit for 2nd grade

by Amita Plantz


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Table of Contents

______________________________________________

American Heritage Slides 3-6

People in Societies Slides 7-9

World Interactions Slides 10-12

Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities Slides 13-16

Democratic Processes Slides 17-19

Decision Making and Resources Slides 20-22

Science, Technology, and Society Slides 23-25

Closing Slide 26


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American Heritage

  • ACTIVITIES

  • Read Pioneer Farm: Living on a Farm in the 1880’s by Megan O’Hara, and create a time line of chores/tasks accomplished in one day.

  • Read about a typical day on a modern farm and compare the work done to the work done on a pioneer farm. The class can make lists of tasks and compare these lists to determine what has changed and what has stayed the same.

  • Visit Carriage Hill Farm in Huber Heights or Johnston Farm in Piqua, and participate in activities such as hayrides, soapmaking, and candle making.


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American Heritage

  • ACTIVITIES (continued)

  • Examine historical photographs of area farms (Fulton Farms, Troy and Johnston Farm, Piqua), and compare with recent photographs.

  • Read Harvest Year by Cris Peterson. Create a poster with all the months of the year, and place stickers or drawings of the foods that are harvested in the U.S. each month.

  • Read Century Farm by Cris Peterson, and then have a class discussion on how one farm has changed in 100 years and how it has stayed the same.


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American Heritage

WEBSITES

Knott’s Berry Farm – http://www.knotts.com/AdvinEdu/advinedu.htm

Ohio Dept. of Agriculture list of Century Farms – www.state.oh.us/agr/newsrel3-9.htm

Seeds of Change Garden – www.mnh.si.edu/garden/history/welcome.html

CyberLibrary – www.cyberspaceag.com/cyberlibrary.html

Ag History U.S. Dept. of Agriculture – www.usda.gov/history2/back.htm


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American Heritage

WEBSITES (continued)

Kids World – www.agr.state.nc.us/cyber/kidswrld/general/index.htm

Story of Farms (teacher site) – www.historylink101.com/lessons/farm-city/story-of-farming.htm

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture – www.usda.gov/news/usdakids/index.html


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People in Societies

  • ACTIVITIES

  • Read Farmers by William Russell, and make a chart of similarities and differences among different kinds of farmers.

  • Look at the cultural heritage of students in the class. Bring in foods produced on farms of those students’ cultures.

  • Talk about different groups organized by farmers such as granges, 4-H clubs, Future Farmers of America clubs, Farm Bureaus, etc. Write to these local groups for more information on how they are organized.


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People in Societies

  • ACTIVITIES (continued)

  • Label a map of the U.S. according to what kinds of farmers live in a region. For example, place a sticker or drawing of cranberries in Maine where farmers produce cranberries. A variety of sources can be used for this activity including Harvest Year by Cris Peterson.

  • After reading about farms, have students list items in their house that come from a farm, such as milk, popcorn, apples, and meat. Then discuss how a community is dependent upon local farms.


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People in Societies

WEBSITES

Farmers, Farmers Everywhere – (student simulation, they choose what kind of farmer to be) http://projects.edtech.sandi.net/hawthorne/farm/

Seeds of Change Garden – www.mnh.si.edu/garden/diversity/welcome.html

Farms Around the World – www.disknet.com/indiana-biolab/farms.htm

FAW Project – www.benicia.k12.ca.us/henderson/fawproject.htm

Wheat Mania – Kansas Wheathearts – www.wheatmania.com/kwfintro.html


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World Interactions

  • ACTIVITIES

  • Read about problems farms face in the U.S. and other parts of the world and make lists to compare these problems. A variety of sources, including Farming Around the World by Louise and Richard Floethe may be used in this activity.

  • Read a description of a farm layout to students and, in groups, have them arrange cardboard buildings on a green poster board demonstrating the relative location of buildings on the farm. For example, the big red barn is next to the chicken coop. Then discuss each group’s representation of the farm.

  • Tour a local farm and have students create a map of the farm from their visit.


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World Interactions

  • ACTIVITIES (continued)

  • Create a large poster of the world. Give each student two continents. They have to find one food item or animal found on a farm for each of their continents, other than Antarctica. They will draw their item or animal on a sticky label and place it on the world map. Books that may be used include Farming Around the World by Louise and Richard Floethe and Uncommon Farm Animals by Ann Larkin Hansen.

  • Pass out Bingo cards with pictures of locations on a farm, such as stables, barn, well, chicken coop, pigsty, farm house, etc. Ask questions such as “Where is a good place to find horses?” Each student selects the appropriate location on their card and marks it with a chip. When someone yells “Bingo!” discuss the locations and why they were appropriate.


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World Interactions

WEBSITES

Barnyard Buddies – www.execpc.com/%7Ebyb/indexa.html

Kidz Korner – www.mda.state.mi.us/kids/index.html

Seeds of Change Garden – www.mnh.si.edu/garden/recipes/welcome.html

Story of Farms (teacher site) – www.historylink101.com/lessons/farm-city/story-of-farming.htm

Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (teacher) – www.fao.org/


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Decision Making and Resources

  • ACTIVITIES

  • Give each student two items that they produce on their farm (e.g. corn and peas) and a list of two items they need. They must find the person in the room that has each item and barter for that item using the goods they produced on their farm.

  • Have students go through a “truck” that has just brought goods from a local farm. They must sort the goods and, using dye cuts, create a picture graph for each category of goods brought by the “truck.”

  • Cut out local grocery store adds to create a store display of farm goods. Have students create a list of items they want to purchase and pass out different amounts of money to each. Then let them see how many items on their list they can purchase.


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Decision Making and Resources

  • ACTIVITIES (continued)

  • Read From Grain to Bread by Ali Mitgutsch, Potatoes by Dorothy Turner, and Corn is Maize by Aliki. Then brainstorm all the possible byproducts of farm crops, and create collages of corn products, grain products, potato products, and any others the class can think of.

  • Read Chapter 4 of Corn: What It Is, What It Does by Cynthia Kellogg. Then discuss services a farmer needs from other people in the community in order to get his food to market. Have students assume each of the roles and walk corn kernels through the process of going to market.


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Decision Making and Resources

WEBSITES

NC State University Cooperative Extension 4-H Farm Animal Awareness Workbook – http://lenoir.ces.state.nc.us/staff/jnix/pubs/an.workbook

National Agricultural Statistics Service – www.usda.gov/nass/sso-rpts.htm

CyberLibrary – www.cyberspaceag.com/cyberlibrary.html

IL Dept. of Agriculture Kids Page – www.agr.state.il.us/kidspage/index.html

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture – www.usda.gov/news/usdakids/index.html


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Decision Making and Resources

WEBSITES (continued)

Kidz Korner – www.mda.state.mi.us/kids/index.html

Ag’s Cool – www.agr.state.nc.us/agscool


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Democratic Processes

  • ACTIVITIES

  • In many of the farm books, students may read about 4-H club. Discuss how the leader of a 4-H club is like the town mayor or the state governor or even the President of the U.S. Ask students what roles other 4-H members represent. Have a local 4-H leader come in to explain about 4-H.

  • Read excerpts from books including The American Family Farm by Joan Anderson and George Ancona. Then put students into groups and give them a list of chores to do. Have students divide the list of chores among them “fairly.” Talk about why it is better to divide the work than to do it oneself.

  • Having visited and read about farms, have students create a list of rules that would be good for the farm. Then generate a class list of farm rules and discuss why each rule should be included.


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Democratic Processes

  • ACTIVITIES (continued)

  • Have a farmer come in and talk about what kinds of jobs he does on the farm and what kinds of jobs he delegates. Ask him to talk about the importance of authority on a farm.

  • Go over farm safety with students and talk about necessary rules to maintain safety.


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Democratic Processes

WEBSITES

The National 4-H Council – www.fourhcouncil.edu

Future Farmers of America – www.ffa.org

Farmers, Farmers Everywhere – http://projects.edtech.sandi.net/hawthorne/farm/

Farm Safety 4 Just Kids – www.fs4jk.org/

The Adventures of Ready Rooster – deere.com/deerecom/_Kids/Ready+Rooster/

Kidz Korner – www.mda.state.mi.us/kids/index.html


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Citizenship Rights

and Responsibilities

  • ACTIVITIES

  • Set up a sawhorse with a picture of a cow on it. Poke tiny holes in a surgical glove and fill the glove with milk. Attach it to the sawhorse and let the kids take turns “milking a cow.”

  • Have students design their own miniature farm somewhere on the school grounds. Then decide what “crops” will be planted. Choose a location in the community to which the crops will be donated when harvested.

  • Divide students into groups of four or five. Give each group a scenario and materials. For example, the barn was destroyed in a tornado; a new one must be built immediately. In their group, students have to use craft sticks, glue, paper, cardboard, etc. to build a new barn.


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Citizenship Rights

and Responsibilities

  • ACTIVITIES (continued)

  • Place students in groups of four or five. Give them a task to be done in a certain amount of time. For example, they must shuck and shell 15 ears of corn in half an hour. Let each group decide how they will accomplish the task (i.e. each takes a stage in the process or each goes through the whole process on their own).

  • Have each student create a list of questions that they would like to find out during their visit to a local farm. Upon returning from the farm, have students determine if they had their questions answered and share answers with the class.


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Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities

WEBSITES

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture – www.usda.gov/news/usdakids/index.html

NC State University Cooperative Extension 4-H Farm Animal Awareness Workbook – http://lenoir.ces.state.nc.us/staff/jnix/pubs/an.workbook

Farm Safety 4 Just Kids – www.fs4jk.org/

Kidz Korner – www.mda.state.mi.us/kids/index.html

Welcome to Ag Day – www.agday.org


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Science, Technology, and Society

  • ACTIVITIES

  • After visiting farms and reading about farms, have students brainstorm ways that farmers respond to the environment. For example, ask them to recall or think of ways farmers deal with floods, droughts, and pests.

  • Look at farm machinery books such as Farm by Ned Halley. Then have students create their own farm machinery from tissue boxes, cardboard, etc. and explain what their machine is used for.

  • Read books comparing old and new ways of farming, such as Century Farm by Cris Peterson. Then discuss how new ways have improved farming.


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Science, Technology, and Society

  • ACTIVITIES (continued)

  • Brainstorm ways that computers can be used on farms. Then have a farmer talk to students about how he or she uses computers.

  • Discuss foods that we eat that may grow far away such as pineapples, bananas, coffee. Have the kids think of ways that it gets to them. Talk about how there are refrigerated trucks, vacuum packed products, etc. Then have the kids think of a new way to get food from one place to another. They should draw a picture showing their process.


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Science, Technology, and Society

WEBSITES

Kids Field Day – Kansas State University – www.oznet.ksu.edu/fieldday/kids

Kids Farm – www.kidsfarm.com

Kiddyhouse.com – www.kiddyhouse.com/Farm

CyberLibrary – www.cyberspaceag.com/cyberlibrary.html

Sci4Kids – www.ars.usda.gov/is/kids/index.html

Wheat Mania – Kansas Wheathearts – www.wheatmania.com/awesomeactivities.html


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A Word About

Farms

The farm is a great topic for a thematic unit because it can be integrated across many content areas. It can easily incorporate health and science with the many plants and animals found on a farm. In addition, math can be weaved in with measurements, sorting, geometry, and story problems. The arts can be integrated with farm songs, art projects, and square dancing. Finally, language arts can be explored through the use of literature. There is an abundance of children’s books, videos, and songs about farms. Kids seem to naturally love this topic as well.


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