The geography of lihtc developments in north carolina l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 43

The Geography of LIHTC Developments in North Carolina PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 185 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: Home / Garden

The Geography of LIHTC Developments in North Carolina. Civil Rights Mandates in the Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program: A Strategic Planning Session July 18 th 2005. Jason Reece, AICP Senior GIS/Demographic Specialist Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race & Ethnicity

Download Presentation

The Geography of LIHTC Developments in North Carolina

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


The Geography of LIHTC Developments in North Carolina

Civil Rights Mandates in the Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program:

A Strategic Planning Session

July 18th 2005

Jason Reece, AICP

Senior GIS/Demographic Specialist

Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race & Ethnicity

The Ohio State University


The Geography of LIHTC

  • Key Research Questions

    • Where are Family LIHTC Projects Located?

    • Are LIHTC Projects Located in High Poverty Communities?

    • Are LIHTC Projects Located in Racially Concentrated Communities?

    • Are the Results Different In Metro vs. Non Metro Areas?


LIHTC in NC and Poverty

  • Nearly 2/3’s of projects were in neighborhoods with poverty rates greater than the state average in 2000

  • Almost 40% were located in “high” poverty neighborhoods with poverty greater than 20%

    • In comparison, only 19% of the State’s census tracts had poverty rates higher than 20% in 2000

  • State wide results were consistent with national and regional (the South) averages for poverty in LIHTC neighborhoods


Family LIHTC and Poverty in NC


LIHTC in NC and Race

  • The State’s family LIHTC projects are also more likely to be found in neighborhoods with high African American populations

    • ¾’s of projects are located in neighborhoods with African American population representation higher than the state average

    • More than ½ of LIHTC projects are in neighborhoods that are more than 40% African American

    • Projects appear more racially concentrated than national and regional averages for LIHTC neighborhoods


LIHTC in NC and Race


Variations in Metro vs. Non-Metro Areas

  • The characteristics of LIHTC projects can vary significantly inside and outside of metropolitan areas

    • Analysis of Metro and Non-Metro family projects in NC finds that both metro and non-metro projects are located in more racially and economically concentrated areas

    • Metro LIHTC Projects (Neighborhood Avg.)

      • LIHTC Neighborhoods: 17% Poverty Rate, 47% African American

      • Metro Average for Poverty (10.9%) and % African American (21.8%)

    • Non-Metro LIHTC Projects (Neighborhood Avg.)

      • LIHTC Neighborhoods: 20% Poverty Rate, 43% African American

      • Non Metro Average for Poverty (15.2%) and % African American (22.7%)


Poverty and LIHTC Metro vs. Non-Metro Areas


African American Population and LIHTC Metro vs. Non-Metro Areas


Trends Within Metro Areas: Poverty and Race(Average, Minimum, Maximum, Std. Dev.)


Analysis of the State’s Largest Regions

  • Family projects are more likely to be found in racially and economically concentrated neighborhoods in the State’s three largest metropolitan areas

    • Results vary by region, but generally are consistent with statewide findings


Results for the Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill MSA

Average LIHTC Neighborhood:

Poverty Rate 16.3%, 40.1% African American

Metro Comparison: Poverty (9.3%), (20.4%) Af. Am.


Zoom Image

Of Poverty and “Family”

LIHTC Projects


Zoom Image Of African American Population and “Family” LIHTC Projects


Results for the Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point MSA

Average LIHTC Neighborhood:

Poverty Rate 21.4%, 71.7% African American

Metro Comparison: Poverty (10.4%), (20.1%) Af. Am.


Zoom Image

Of Poverty and “Family”

LIHTC Projects


Zoom Image Of African American Population and “Family” LIHTC Projects


Results for the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill MSA

Average LIHTC Neighborhood:

Poverty Rate 15.2%, 41.3% African American

Metro Comparison: Poverty (9.3%), (20.4%) Af. Am.


LIHTC and Hispanic/Latino Neighborhoods

  • The Hispanic/Latino population is one of the fastest growing racial populations in North Carolina

  • Our analysis of the Hispanic/Latino population within LIHTC neighborhoods indicates that projects are generally not clustered in areas with large Latino populations

    • But, when analyzing both African American and Latino populations, data suggests that racially concentrated African American LIHTC neighborhoods do contain a substantial Latino population


LIHTC and Hispanic/Latino Neighborhoods

  • The average LIHTC neighborhood contains a Hispanic/Latino population of 6.3%

    • (4.7% of NC’s pop. Is Latino)

  • The average combined Hispanic/Latino and African American population within LIHTC neighborhoods is 52.8% (6.2% of this population appears to be Latino)


Access to Suburban LIHTC Projects

  • Measuring African American access to suburban LIHTC projects

    • Preliminary analysis of projects found in blocks in suburban areas outside of Raleigh seem to indicate some African American access, but not extensive access

      • More analysis with better data is needed to assess this phenomenon


Zoom Image Of African American by Block Population and “Family” LIHTC Projects


Temporal Trends

  • Has concentration by race and poverty increased or decreased from 1990 to 2004?

  • Analyzed the average neighborhood poverty rate and percentage African American for projects based upon date

    • Analysis three periods of data (5 year intervals)

      • 1990 to 1994

      • 1995 to 1999

      • 2000 to 2004

        • Note fewer projects for analysis during the 2000 to 2004 cycle


Temporal Trends

  • Results:

    • More recent projects are located in neighborhoods with a smaller African American population

    • Mixed results for poverty rates

      • The average poverty rate for neighborhoods with projects awarded from 1995 to 1999 declined, but more recent projects were located in higher poverty neighborhoods

        • This could be due to the smaller sample of recent projects available for analysis


Temporal Trends


Conclusions

  • Family LIHTC projects are clustered in more racially concentrated higher poverty neighborhoods

  • Both metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas exhibit these trends

  • Concentration in Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods appears to be less severe

  • Temporal analysis indicates more recent projects are being built in less racially concentrated communities, but poverty results are mixed


Notes on the Data and Methods 1

  • Family LIHTC projects were defined by identifying projects that did not have an “elderly” target population (as defined by the State)

  • This analysis covers projects from 1990 to 2004 and utilized both the HUD LIHTC database and State LIHTC records

  • “Neighborhoods” were defined by 2000 Census Tract boundaries


Notes on the Data and Methods 2

  • Due to missing geographic data in the HUD database and incomplete address data in the State database, some projects could not be mapped for the analysis

  • Of the 986 LIHTC projects identified for this analysis, 152 were not analyzed due to missing geographic data


Questions or Comments? For More Information Visit Us On-Line:www.KirwanInstitute.org

E-Mail @: [email protected]


  • Login