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How to make an In-Text Citation Sandwich. MLA Works Cited Citation 2. MLA In-Text Citation. Two Types of Citations. MLA Work Cited Citation. A MLA Work Cited citation goes in your Works Cited page (aka bibliography) in the back of your essay. For example:

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mla work cited citation
MLA Work Cited Citation

A MLA Work Cited citation goes in your Works Cited page (aka bibliography) in the back of your essay. For example:

Coontz, Stephanie. “Family Myths, Family Relatives.” Salon 12 Dec. 1997. 3 Feb. 2007 http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/1997.

in text citation
In-Text Citation

An In-Text Citation is used as a direct quote, story, fact, statistic that you are referencing within your essay. In-Text Citations always refer to a source that is referenced in your Works Cited page. For Example:

One author claims that “no one is concerned with this issue, you dork” (Jones, 45).

how to use quotes in text citation sandwich
How to use quotes: In-Text Citation Sandwich

Setup:Explain who is saying the quote, and set up how you plan to use it.

Quote:Make sure that you’re quoting enough of the passage so that you don’t take it out of context – don’t cut off sentences, or misquote anyone.

Analysis:It is important that you:

-justify why you are using the quote.

-explain how the quote connects to the thesis.

why do we use quotes textual evidence
Why do we use quotes/textual evidence?
  • Grounds the argument (not “I believe” argument).
  • Provides “neutral ground” to show your reader how you’ve interpreted the author – shows your reasoning.
  • Gives you evidence to analyze.
  • Allows you to address the author without summarizing.
  • Demonstrates your analysis skills.
setting up a quote
Setting Up a Quote
  • Introduce who is saying the passage
  • Tell the reader the author and title
  • Explain the context of the quote with a brief summary of the plot.
  • Give the reader a preview of the “lens” you are using to examine the quote.
which quotes to use or avoid
Which quotes to use or avoid
  • Quotes have to be chosen purposefully that support your argument.
  • Pick quotes that further your point, not restate your argument.
  • Take a risk: choose a quote that may be complicated, one that you may disagree with, or interpreted in an unusual way.
in this example please identify the set up quote and analysis
In this example please identify the set-up, quote, and analysis
  • Social historian Richard Sennett names the tendency to come to terms with difficult experiences a "purification process" whereby "threatening or painful dissonances are warded off to preserve intact a clear and articulated image of oneself and one’s place in the world" (11). Sennett argues that humans need to “purify” there past trauma through the way they project themselves to the outside world.
in this example please identify the set up quote and analysis10
In this example please identify the set-up, quote, and analysis
  • Social historian Richard Sennett names the tendency to come to terms with difficult experiences a "purification process" whereby "threatening or painful dissonances are warded off to preserve intact a clear and articulated image of oneself and one’s place in the world" (11).Sennett argues that humans need to “purify” there past trauma through the way they project themselves to the outside world.
remember the importance of transitions
Remember the importance of Transitions
  • Transitions are like gears in a car, they help you shift from one paragraph to the next.
  • Here is a list of common transition words: And, in addition to, furthermore, moreover, besides, than, too, also, both-and, another, equally important, first, second, etc
slide12

When transitioning from one paragraph to the next read the last sentence of paragraph 1, add your transition, and connect it to the topic sentence in paragraph 2.

EXAMPLE:

Paragraph 1: The football incident is important in the story because it demonstrates the major conflict between Lucy and Charlie Brown.

Transition: Like the conflict about the football, another literary device that is important in Peanut’s cartoon is the refrain of “Good Grief.”

Paragraph 2: One of the famous lines uttered by Charlie Brown is the phrase “Good Grief.” Whenever he is frustrated or feels he is cheated in life he utters “Good Grief.”

summary
Summary

Set-Up the Quote: What is the context of the quote?

Evidence: The Quote Itself.

Analysis: How does the quote connect to your thesis?

Transition: Connecting one paragraph to the next.

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