To Each Its Own Meaning: An Introduction to Biblical Criticisms and Their Application

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21-Oct-11. Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies

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To Each Its Own Meaning: An Introduction to Biblical Criticisms and Their Application

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1. 21-Oct-11 Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies & Early Christianity 1 To Each Its Own Meaning: An Introduction to Biblical Criticisms and Their Application Revised and Expanded Edition Edited by Steven L. McKenzie & Stephen R. Haynes (Louisville/London/Leiden: Westminster John Knox, 1999)

2. 21-Oct-11 Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies & Early Christianity 2 Part One: Traditional Methods of Biblical Criticism

3. 21-Oct-11 Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies & Early Christianity 3 Modern “Historical-Critical” Methods Historical approach Source criticism Form criticism Tradition-historical criticism Redaction criticism

4. 21-Oct-11 Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies & Early Christianity 4 Historical v. Literary Methods Diachronic: Focus on “roots” Archaeological grounds Historical background Literary precedents Development of text through time Key objective: uncover authorial intention [E.g., Dei Verbum] Synchronic Focus on text itself in final form Relationships among textual elements Interaction between text and reader(s) Authorial intention is irretrievable (“intentional fallacy”) [E.g., Stanley Fish]

5. 21-Oct-11 Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies & Early Christianity 5 Part Two: Expanding the Tradition

6. 21-Oct-11 Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies & Early Christianity 6 Newer Interpretive Models Social-scientific criticism Canonical criticism Rhetorical criticism & Intertextuality

7. 21-Oct-11 Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies & Early Christianity 7 Part Three: Overturning the Tradition

8. 21-Oct-11 Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies & Early Christianity 8 Literary Methods Structural criticism Narrative criticism Reader-response criticism

9. 21-Oct-11 Sheila E. McGinn, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Studies & Early Christianity 9 Post-Modern Hermeneutics Post-structuralist criticism Feminist criticism Socio-economic criticism

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