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School Psychology and the APA Model Act for the State Licensure of Psychologists Revisions PowerPoint PPT Presentation


School Psychology and the APA Model Act for the State Licensure of Psychologists Revisions. Understanding the impact of possible change, and planning for state action. Modified and referenced from NASP Public Policy Institute. What this Presentation Covers.

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School Psychology and the APA Model Act for the State Licensure of Psychologists Revisions

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School psychology and the apa model act for the state licensure of psychologists revisions l.jpg

School Psychology and the APA Model Act for the State Licensure of Psychologists Revisions

Understanding the impact of possible change, and planning for state action.

Modified and referenced from NASP

Public Policy Institute


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What this Presentation Covers

  • Background on credentialing and licensing of the practice of school psychology.

  • Key factors involved in state credentialing and how it varies by state.

  • Proposed changes to APA’s Model Act for the State Licensure of Psychologists (Model Act) and how these changes could potentially impact current credentialing in school psychology.

  • Strategies for influencing APA and how to advocate to maintain the credentialing system currently in place.


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Why is this topic important for states?

  • APA is currently considering changes to their model act for licensure of psychologists that has the potential to change the practice of school psychology and the title of school psychologist.

  • The effect of the change will be determined at the state level.

  • State leadership will play a crucial role in how each state responds to these changes.


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Credentialing for school psychologists is complicated…

In order to advocate for title and practice it is important to understand

how school psychologists are credentialed in your state, and across the country, and the impact of changes in APA’s model act because…

credentialing happens at the state level


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Some background on school psychology title and credentialing

  • School psychologists have been credentialed by state boards of education long before licensure standards were set for psychologists.

  • The title “school psychologist” is an accurate reflection of the training and supervised field-based experiences in psychology and education required for credentialing in the states.


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The Title School Psychologist

  • … has been widely recognized for both specialist level and doctoral level degrees since the 1950’s.

  • … has been specifically acknowledged by APA governance through the exemption language since 1977.


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Credentialing Key Facts


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Who gives school psychologists their right to practice?

  • State Credentialing Boards, including:

    • Board of Education, also referred to as State Education Agency (SEA) or Department of Education, Department of Public Instruction

    • Board of Psychology, Board of Psychological Examiners


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What is the difference between credential and license?

  • Both a “certificate” and a “license” give an individual the credential to practice school psychology but are offered and regulated by different regulatory agencies within a state and may limit where a school psychologist may work independently:

    • Certification—term most often used by Boards of Education

    • Licensure—term most often used by Boards of Psychology; also used by Boards of Education


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Guidelines for Credentialing

  • NASP Credentialing Standards (2000)

  • APA Model Act for State Licensure (1987)

  • Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards Model Act of Licensure (2001)


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Credentialing Distinctions

  • NASP standards are:

    • Specialist Level (equivalent to 60 graduate hours; Ed.S; Masters Degree + Certificate of Advanced Study)

      OR

    • Doctoral Level (PhD, EdD, PsyD)


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Credentialing Key Ideas

  • All states, but one, credential, title and regulate school-based practice of school psychology according to state educational agenciesnot psychology licensure boards.

  • The exception: the Texas Board of Psychological Examiners credentials “licensed specialists in school psychology”


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Credentialing Facts

  • 49 + DC : Number of State SEAs that credential school psychologists

  • 29: Number of State SEAs that credential using Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP) standards

  • 43 + DC : Number of State SEAs that credential School Psychologists at both the specialist and doctoral levels

  • 45 + DC : Number of State SEAs that credential school psychologists using the title “School Psychologist”


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Credentialing Facts (cont’)

  • Highest degree for Practitioners

    • 75.6% Specialist level

    • 24.4% Doctoral level

    • Among Practitioners

      • 91% are credentialed by SEAs

      • 30.6% are also licensed


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Credentialing Key Facts

  • 10 states credential school psychologists for independent practice through various means:

    • CA- Board of Behavioral Sciences Licensure: Licensed Educational Psychologist

    • FL Department of Health: Licensed School Psychology

    • IN – Department of Education: Division of Professional Standards: Independent Practice Endorsement

    • MA Allied Board of Mental Health: Educational Psychologist

    • OH Board of Psychology: School Psychologist

    • SC Board of Examiners for Psycho-Educational Specialists: Psycho-Educational Specialist

    • VA Board of Psychology: School Psychologist

    • WV Board of Psychology: School Psychologist

    • WI Board of Psychology: Private Practice School Psychologist

    • WY Board of Psychology: Specialist in School Psychology and School Psychologist


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What is the APA Model Act?

  • American Psychological Association’s Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists (Model Act) is its prototype recommended language to be used by states to draft legislation and regulation for licensing psychologists.


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Basic Tenets of the Model Act

  • APA recommends restricting the use of the term “psychologist” to those persons who a) have an earned doctorate in psychology and b) are licensed by state psychology licensing boards.

  • APA also recommends that psychological practice be restricted to those who hold doctoral degrees and are licensed psychologists.


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School Psychology Exemption

  • Since 1977, APA’s Model Act included an exemption for school psychologists to use the title “school psychologist” provided they are:

    • Appropriately credentialed by their state board of education

    • Practice in school settings


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Current Model Act

  • The current Model Act was adopted in 1987.

  • APA is considering changes to this policy statement that contains several issues of concern and relevance to school psychologists.


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What are the major changes?

  • Industrial/organization and consulting psychology licensure requirement

  • Sequence of training change to allow two years of documented supervised training experiences to now be pre-doctoral or postdoctoral.

  • Removal the title exemption language for school psychologists that recognizes the right of specialist level school psychologists credentialed by their state education agency and practicing in public schools to use the term psychologist” in their title.


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What are the major changes?, continued

  • Addition of the requirement that a person be “licensed” to use the title “psychologist”

  • Changes in the description of psychological services to include more specific descriptions of services typically offered in schools by school psychologists (e.g. “evaluating”, “assessing”, “cognition” “skills”, etc.)


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School Psychologist Exemption

  • The proposed model act removes the exemption language that reflects recognition of the right of specialist and doctoral level school psychologists credentialed by their state education agency and practicing in public schools to use the term “psychologist” in their title.


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How does removing the exemption affect school psychology?

  • The exemption itself represents a formal recognition of the agreement between APA and school psychologists that the title school psychologist and school based practice are well established and well protected by state education agencies.


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How does removing the exemption affect school psychology (cont’d)?

  • Removing the exemption presents a message to state legislatures and state regulation agencies that only doctoral level practitioners are eligible for the “title” of psychologist and potentially to practice psychology independently in any setting.


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NASP Strongly Opposes this Change

  • NASP has responded to these proposed changes by formally notifying APA through a variety of formats that it opposes removing the exemption.

  • NASP’s response is posted on the NASP website.

  • NASP has materials and resources available to assist you and your state respond to APA.


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NASP Strongly Opposes this Change

  • NASP is committed to supporting school psychologists’ rights to retain their title and protect school psychology practice.

  • NASP standards for credentialing of school psychologists have been influential at the state level.

  • Credential for school psychologists is determined state by state, so it is the responsibility of state leaders to monitor and advocate for school psychology title and practice at the state level.


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The Good News and Bad News

  • The good news is that the title “school psychologist” and independent school based practice are well established across the country. There is no automatic threat to either of these by changes in the Model Act itself.


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More Good News

  • Keep in mind the APA’s Model Act is a recommended prototype for state legislation and not an official law or regulation. It requires action by state legislatures to affect substantive change.


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Still More Good News

  • The “school psychology” exemption remains in the Model Act of Licensure (2001) of the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards.


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The Bad News

  • The bad news is that APA is influential, especially with state psychological licensing boards. It has the potential to push for changes in well established laws and regulations on the basis of the change in the Model Act.

  • APA is a large well funded organization with its own political agenda to protect and expand market share for doctoral level psychologists and shrinking resources from insurance and private funding sources.

  • Schools are a logical target for expansion that have relatively recently become of interest to APA over the last decade.


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What NASP has done and is doing:

  • NASP has mounted a major effort to gather its members, leaders and national partners and stakeholder groups to respond. (See list of organizations on the web that have supported NASP’s position.)

  • NASP is providing YOU with resources to do the same at the state and local level.


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What NASP has done and is doing (cont’d)

  • NASP communicated via email to all of our members and stakeholder groups about responding to APA during the public comment period (ended on Nov. 1, 2007).

  • NASP created sets of model letters and a mechanism to respond online.

  • NASP is monitoring the public response to the APA Model Act.

  • NASP is pursuing a legal opinion regarding restraint of trade.

  • NASP is providing training, support and materials (like these) to assist states in launching a grassroots advocacy response.


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Now that you know…What do you do?

  • We all need to proactively advocate for APA to reinstate the school psychology exemption in the model act.

  • We all need to gather support from other stakeholder groups to do the same.

  • We all need to develop clear plans of action (at local, state & national levels).


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Introduction to Key Messages

  • The exemption within APA’s 1987 Model Licensure Act is a recognition of school psychologists’ long history of contributing to schools and the field of education, and as a specialty area within psychology.

  • Many recognizable benefits have resulted from the 1977 and current 1987 title exemption for school psychologists who are credentialed by their state education agency and practice in public school settings.


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Key Message #1

  • Specialist-level school psychologists provide critical services that support the mental health and academic achievement of all children.

    • School psychologists are trained to implement prevention activities and to provide interventions for mental health and learning issues at the individual, group, and school-wide levels.

    • Today there is significant recognition within the education and health communities of the importance of having school-employed professionals like school psychologists to provide these services in order to meet the growing needs of students.


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Key Message #2

  • Removing the exemption would undermine services to children and families at a time of growing needand current shortages especially in schools in rural and urban areas.

    • There is no benefit to the public, to students and families, schools, or to the profession of psychology to change this exemption for school psychologists credentialed by state education agencies, particularly at a time when there are shortages of school psychologists nationally.

    • Shortages are severe in some under-resourced urban and rural school settings.

    • The shortages are even more critical for individuals of minority and culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds to serve in school settings.


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Key Message #3

  • The credentialing and regulation of school psychologists by State Education Agencies (SEAs) protects the public and ensures services to children and families.

    • SEAs have stringent standards for the graduate education and state credentialing of school psychologists which protect the public.

    • The proposed changes could cause unnecessary confusion and conflict with well-established state laws and state department of education regulations.


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Rationale to support state boards of education’s role in regulating school psychology title and practice:

  • Maintaining the current exemption would prevent potential conflicts between State Education Agencies and Psychology Licensing Boards for school-based practice.

  • Laws and regulations for school psychology are well established in most states and have been under the purview of state boards of education for many years.

  • The school psychologist title and credential are recognized for school-based practice in nearly all of the 50 states and the District of Columbia.


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More ideas to support SEA’s regulating school psychology title and practice

  • Credentialing by State Education Agencies helps ensure alignment of standards with other highly-trained school personnel.

  • State Education Agencies have a vested interest in the quality of school personnel and are typically empowered by state lawmakers to set these standards.

  • Currently existing credentialing practices by State Education Agencies ensure that highly qualified school psychologists are employed by schools and provide needed services to children.


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“School Psychologist” title

  • The title “school psychologist” has been associated with school psychological services for more than 50 years. The “title goes with the services”.

  • Doctoral level and specialist level school psychologists do not have differentiated responsibilities in schools.


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See NASP website for details

  • www.nasponline.org/standards/apamla.aspx


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Links to Relevant APA Policy Documents

  • www.apa.org/goverance/cpm/chapter10.html

    Year by year history of resolutions related to professional affairs

  • www.apa.org/about/division/cpmprofessional.html

    APA Council Policy Manual: L. Professional Affairs

  • www.apa.org/apags/licensureaction.html

    “5 Easy Steps to Implement the APA Policy on Licensure


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What else do you need to do?

  • All school psychologists need to be constantly vigilant at the state level about state credentialing and advocate for school psychology title and practice (regardless of the outcome of changes in the model act).

  • All school psychologists need to consistently and proactively communicate your distinct expertise and contribution to outcomes for children, families and schools.


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Plan for Action

  • Phase 1: APA Public Comment period

  • Phase 2: Awareness/Preparation for Future Action

  • Phase 3: Immediate action pending passage of model act by APA or the introduction of licensing bills without an exemption for school psychologists


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Plan for Action – Phase 1

  • Phase 1: APA Public Comment period (ended Nov. 1, 2007)

    • Individual and organizational letters to APA were sent using NASP resources. Over 10,600 letters were sent through the NASP website.

    • APA Division 16 members voted to support reinstatement of the exemption for school psychologists.

    • Key stakeholders wrote letters in opposition to the proposed changes.


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Plan for Action – Phase 2

  • Phase 2: Awareness/Preparation for Future Action

    • Assess your state’s level of risk for credentialing changes.

    • Develop a state portfolio of credentialing information in your state. Expand state resources.

    • Monitor legislation, regulations, changes, and credentialing attempts by other groups.


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Gather State Level Information

  • SEA credential information – title, longevity, specific language, eligibility, scope of practice per regulations, alternative credential

  • Psychology licensure information – title, eligibility, exemption language, cost, access to schools

  • School-based practice information – eligibility for school employment, eligibility for state funding (Sp Ed, Medicaid, etc.)


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Prepare for State Advocacy Response

  • Consult the NASP Advocacy Roadmap for States

    • www.nasponline.org/standards/stateadvocacyraodmap.aspx

    • Review all materials and complete state credentialing profile

    • Develop a State Action Plan

  • Plan for using key resources

    • NASP Overview and Line by Line Analysis

    • Model Act documents on web link

    • Resources on NASP advocacy web page


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Monitor Legislation and Regulations Changes

  • Develop a clear plan to watch for proposed changes to legislation or regulation of State Education Agency credentialing and psychology licensure.

  • Watch for “sunset” of licensure in your state.

  • Monitor possible attempts by other groups to gain credentials without training and field based experience.

  • Utilize NASP tools and resources such as the Netscan state legislative tracking program, consulting NASP GPR Committee, or requesting state advocacy trainings.

  • Utilize links to your state policy and legislation at state legislature and State Education Agency department web links.


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Identify your key stakeholders

  • With whom do you already have an established relationship?

  • Which stakeholder groups have common goals or a vested interest in children/youth?

  • Which stakeholders are interested in maintaining school psychology services from highly trained school personnel?

  • Which stakeholders have stature and influence to impact policies?


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Identify and Reach Out toKey Stakeholders and Allies

  • State commission on credentialing

  • State department staff/liaisons

  • Administrators (Special Ed, Principals, Superintendents, etc.)

  • School boards

  • Other related state associations (ASHA, CEC, Social Work, School Nurses, etc.)


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Identify and Reach Out toKey Stakeholders and Allies

  • NEA/AFT

  • Teachers/other personnel

  • University trainers and graduate students

  • Related Service Professionals

  • School Administrators

  • Disability groups (LD, PACER, etc.)

  • Parent groups (PTO/PTO/Federation of Families)

  • Student leaders or advocacy groups

  • Community service providers


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Develop Needed Communication Network

  • Determine the most efficient and effective methods for communicating quickly and comprehensively.

    • E-mail, website bulletin boards, blogs, e-mail alerts, phone trees, newsletters, etc.

    • Establish a regular communication and reporting process.

    • Establish an “emergency” response system.


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Develop and Post Key Information

  • Create a packet of information that is accessible and comprehensive.

  • Post information in a location easily accessible by interested parties.

  • Carefully select and compile information so that it is sensitive to your audience, contains key messages, and is specific in its requests.


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Create Key Messages

  • Focus on your objectives as you develop your messages from the key messages NASP has provided.

  • Raise awareness of the issues.

  • Build support and recognition of need to act.

  • Increase involvement of your members and stakeholders to act.


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Know Your Audience

  • Level of knowledge/awareness

  • Primary concerns/expectations

  • Perspective

  • Possible barriers to understanding

  • Ability/likelihood to take action


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Be Concise/Clear

  • Pick your main point.

  • State it at the outset.

  • Back it up with 2-3 facts.

  • Provide specific suggestions.

  • Provide personal examples.


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Be Concise/Clear (cont’d)

  • Use audience appropriate language.

  • Avoid acronyms/technical language.

  • Use active tense.

  • Use bullets to the extent possible.

  • Proof your work.


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Plan for Action – Phase 3

  • Phase 3: Immediate Action Pending Passage of the model act by APA

    • Explore legal options on the local level.

    • Contact GPR NASP regional representatives.

    • Disseminate information to state association members.

    • Contact state psychological associations to inquire course of action for the model act.


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Plan for Action – Phase 3, continued

  • Raise awareness regarding NASP model act talking points.

  • Begin dialogue with education leaders, legislators licensing/credentialing boards and allied professional groups.

  • Draft school psychology friendly legislative language.

  • Consider introducing preemptive language.


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Plan for Action – Phase 3 (cont’d)

  • Explore hiring a lobbyist.

  • Identify potential “allies” on state boards, the legislature, state administrators and other policy makers.

  • Activate grassroots advocacy networks.

  • Build relationships with allies and stakeholders.


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Obtain commitment from stakeholders to take action

Approach them with a clear position and collaboratively develop a plan of action.

  • Provide them with key points.

  • Explore what is in it for them.

  • Create a timeline for achieving desired goals.

  • Create templates for communications with contact information and methods for dissemination.

  • Emphasize effective & complete services to children/youth.


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Utilize a system for taking action when needed.

  • Develop strategy for contacting those to take action (to write letters during public comment period, contact state credentialing bodies, preparing testimony, etc.)

  • Create a system for those that will act to access information (online letters, listserv, email distribution list, etc.)

  • Plan to collect information on actions taken and results.

  • Communicate outcomes to all and identify “next steps.”

  • Thank those who acted.


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You do not need to reinvent the wheel as you develop your state level plans.

NASP provides numerous

resources to help you.


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Utilize NASP Materials and Resources.

www.nasponline.org/advocacy/index.aspx

www.nasponline.org/standards/apamla.aspx

  • Model Act information and updates

  • NASP Advocacy Roadmap for States

  • Advocacy Action Center

  • Communications resources

  • Contact GPR committee for assistance


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Government and Professional Relations Committee (GPR)

Chair: Barry Barbarasch [email protected]

Co-chair: Brent Duncan [email protected]

  • Candis Hogan (Central region rep) [email protected]

  • Madeleine Pitsch (Western Region) [email protected]

  • E. Jeanne Pound (Southeast Region) [email protected]

  • Nick Silvestri (Northeast Region) [email protected]

  • Gerald O’Day [email protected]

  • Lynne O. Thies [email protected]

  • Fulvia Franco [email protected]

  • John Kelly [email protected]


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Time to start working on your plan!

  • Identify your main objectives.

  • Select strategies to reach objectives.

  • Identify what is in place and what resources are needed.

  • Specify who can help.

  • Create a timeline and method for monitoring.


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Action Plan

Strategies(Specific ways the objective can be achieved)

Objectives (What immediate tasks need to occur?)

What are needed resources?

Who can help? (Persons to carry out strategies)

Timeline & Monitoring


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Acknowledgements

Thanks to the following leaders who contributed to this presentation:

  • Kathy Pluymert, NASP Program Manager, Professional Standards, [email protected]

  • Jennifer Kitson, NASP Program Manager, Advocacy [email protected]

  • Joan Bohmann, Director Professional Standards & Continuing Professional Development [email protected]

  • Rhonda Armistead, NASP President, [email protected]

  • Stacy Skalski, Director, Public Policy, [email protected]

  • Government & Professional Relations Committee

    www.nasponline.org/advocacy/index.aspx


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