Our Difficult Climb:
Download
1 / 15

Presented by: The Public Sector Group The World Bank - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 231 Views
  • Updated On :
  • Presentation posted in: Travel / Places

Our Difficult Climb: Initial Progress and the Ascent Ahead. Transparency International—World Bank Combating Corruption Workshop Washington, DC March 21, 2003. Presented by: The Public Sector Group The World Bank. A promising start …. Tremendous increase in awareness.

Related searches for Presented by: The Public Sector Group The World Bank

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha

Download Presentation

Presented by: The Public Sector Group The World Bank

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Slide1 l.jpg

Our Difficult Climb:

Initial Progress and the Ascent Ahead

Transparency International—World Bank

Combating Corruption Workshop

Washington, DC March 21, 2003

Presented by:

The Public Sector Group

The World Bank


Slide2 l.jpg

A promising start …

Tremendous increase in awareness

Explosion of activity, cutting-edge diagnostics

Major programs launched, with some early successes

… but we are also facing formidable challenges

To have major impact, need to tackle deeper issues

Possible Paths …

Overview


Slide3 l.jpg

The initial ascent … getting to base camp …

O.P. Mainstreaming AC in CAS (99)

Governance Strategy (00)

State in a Changing World (97)

Strategic Compact (97)

Governance Pillar - CDF (98)

  • Public Expenditure, Financial Mgt. & Procurement Reforms

  • Diagnostic/Data/ Monitoring Tools

  • Administrative & Civil Service Reform

  • Civil Society Voice, Accountability, Media & Transparency Mechanisms

  • State Capture/Corporate Governance

  • Legal/Judicial Reform

JDW “Cancer of Corruption” Speech (10/96)

WDR on Institutions 1982

Anti-corruption Strategy (97)

Gov/A-C Diagnostics start (98)

TI CPI (5/95)

Broadening & Mainstreaming

The ‘Prohibition’ Era

1st set of firms Debarred from WB (99)

Internal AC unit created in WB (98)

Formalization of INT (01)

1970

1980

1990

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003


Slide4 l.jpg

GOOD

GOVERNANCE

Good governance has many dimensions & “entry” points

  • Institutional Checks & Balances

  • Independent, effective judiciary

  • Legislative oversight

  • Decentralization with accountability

  • Global initiatives: OECD Convention, anti-money laundering, WCO

  • Political Accountability

  • Political competition, credible political parties

  • Transparency in party financing

  • Disclosure of parliamentary votes

  • Asset declaration, conflict-of-interest rules

  • Civil Society Voice & Participation

  • Freedom of information

  • Public hearings on draft laws

  • Media/NGOs

  • Community empowerment

  • Report cards, client surveys

  • Competitive Private Sector

  • Economic policies

  • Restructuring of monopolies

  • Effective, streamlined regulation

  • Robust financial systems

  • Corporate governance

  • Collective business associations

  • Public Sector Management

  • Meritocratic civil service with adequate pay

  • Public expenditure, financial management, procurement

  • Tax and customs

  • Frontline service delivery (health, education, infrastructure)


Slide5 l.jpg

Explosion of activities: Examples of major programs launched across countries

Latvia

(anticorruption)

Russia

(customs/treasury)

Ukraine

(tax admin)

Albania

(public admin.)

Kyrgyz Republic

(governance reform)

Jordan

(civil society)

Cambodia

(PE; forestry)

Ghana (PE

accountability)

Philippines (transport)

Guatemala

(diagnostic to action program)

Indonesia

(local governance)

Gabon

(water/electricity)

Bangladesh

(civil society)

Colombia

(diagnostics

& civil society)

Uganda

(PRSC; education)

Pakistan

(devolution)

India – Andra Pradesh

(power; e-gov); Karnataka

(right to info)

Bolivia:

(public admin.)

Tanzania

(PSR)

Ethiopia

(decentralization)


Slide6 l.jpg

Some approaches that appear to be working … across countries

Latvia

(Anticorruption)

Ghana

(Public Expenditure

Accountability)

Indonesia

(Community Empowerment)

Gabon

(Water/Electricity)

Uganda

(Education, Capacity Building-Action Learning/Core AC Course)

India – Andhra Pradesh

(Power; E-governance)


Slide7 l.jpg

But on average, no evidence of significant improvement on control of corruption …

Source: ICRG, 1994-2002. Subject to margins of error, as it is based on only one source.

Good

Poor


Slide8 l.jpg

… though variations across different dimensions … control of corruption …

How significant are these obstacles to your business?

High

1999

2002

Low

0

Frequency

of active

Perceived Impact of

Bribe

frequency

State Capture

capture by firms

Some signs of initial progress in some regions…

Business Environment & Enterprise Survey (BEEPS) in ECA


Slide9 l.jpg

Some programs that have stalled – and why… control of corruption …

  • The challenge of politics:

    • No political ‘buy-in’ – despite plethora of diagnostics and pressure from civil society: Bangladesh

    • Difficulties in sustainability when there is no political traction: Georgia judiciary

    • The need to anticipate political obstacles: Action Oriented Learning Program in AFR – Malawi vs. Uganda

    • Opposition from powerful vested interests in Cabinet & bureaucracy: India, Karnataka – right to information


Slide10 l.jpg

Excellent at diagnostics

0

Good at addressing the ‘surface’ manifestations

Good at technical solutions and design

Lessons learnt, broader implications … a long way to go …

  • Enhance ‘demand’ pressures for reform

  • Overcome vested interests against reform

  • Reverse the “culture” of corruption in the public sector

  • Tackle political drivers of corruption (e.g., party financing)

  • Within WB, mainstream across sectors and countries

But, struggling to address ‘deeper’ underlying issues


Slide11 l.jpg

Shrinking the time horizon is conducive:

  • New

New approaches

CORRUPTION

CORRUPTION

CORRUPTION

  • New

New approaches

10?

7. The way forward … shortening the journey

World Bank

  • Lending

  • AAA

Strengthening the “demand” for reform

Partnerships

Improving the “supply” of reform

Partners (e.g. TI, bilaterals)

¥

25?

Years


Slide12 l.jpg

Enhance domestic pressures for reform is conducive:

Strengthen international pressure for reform

  • Assist civil society in monitoring governance reforms: Slovakia, TI

  • Support CSOs & FBOs that mobilize citizens in favor of government performance: PAC, Bangalore; Action Learning Programs, LAC

  • Help SMEs to organize & mobilize MNCs against capture by large vested interests: ECA

  • Strategically support responsible media on anticorruption: Philippines Center for Investigative Journalism

  • Use international bully pulpit to re-energize the agenda: JDW

  • Say “no” when warranted: Indonesia? Kenya?

  • Use the international platform to highlight good and bad governance countries: TI, CPIA, KKZ, BEEPS indicators

  • Strengthen global anticorruption initiatives: OECD Convention, Anti-Money Laundering

The Way Forward: Strengthening the “demand” for reform

CORRUPTION


The way forward enhancing the supply of reform l.jpg

Reverse the is conducive: “culture” of corruptionafflicting the public & private sectors

Help reformist governments overcome obstacles

Help tackle political drivers of corruption

  • Understand the norms permeating public-private corruption networks & how to combat them: Peru

  • Support CSOs/FBOs working towards a transformation of values/ethics in the public sector: AP, India

  • Support enforceable conflict of interest rules: Latvia

  • Promote better corporate governance & codes of conduct: TI business principles for countering bribery

  • Strengthen capacity building & institutional reform efforts: More robust lending & AAA

  • Strengthen evaluation for ‘scaling up’: DEC, OED, WBI; partners

  • Emphasize change mgt & design programs to defuse opposition: Education reform, LAC

  • Support AC efforts that improve service delivery that citizens can observe: Jordan

  • Address issue of party finance disclosure & regulation: UK DFID, TI?

  • Work with media & Parliaments on political corruption: WBI, others

  • Develop better tools to understand state capture, market for influence & networks DEC, WBI, others

  • Work with future leaders: WBI Youth Program

The way forward: Enhancing the “supply” of reform


The way forward l.jpg

Internal incentives is conducive:

The way forward …

World Bank

Deepen and enhance leadership and ownership of anticorruption agenda across sectors –

beyond PREM/ WBI/ OPCS/ LEG

Strengthen staff fortitude and incentives to say “no” when warranted


Slide15 l.jpg

Q&A is conducive:

and

Discussion


ad
  • Login