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Desktop Publishing Presentation Instructions. Use the Navigation Buttons at the bottom of this window to move through the presentation. Use the “Home” Button to go to the Menu if you want to jump to a specific section. END. Main Menu. What is Desktop Publishing? Pixel Resolution Line Art

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PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Desktop Publishing' - PamelaLan


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Desktop PublishingPresentation Instructions

  • Use the Navigation Buttons at the bottom of this window to move through the presentation.

  • Use the “Home” Button to go to the Menu if you want to jump to a specific section.

END


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Main Menu

  • What is Desktop Publishing?

  • Pixel

  • Resolution

  • Line Art

  • Grayscale

  • Halftone

  • RGB Color

  • Image Compression

  • Image Formats

  • Raster Images

  • Vector Graphics

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Desktop Publishing

  • “Desktop Publishing” applications are used to combine text, clip art, digitized images, etc. to produce brochures, flyers, newsletters, etc.

Slide 2 of 13

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Pixel

  • An image on the screen is made up of many small dots called “Pixels” (Picture Elements).

  • The pixel dimensions of the common “standard size” image from a digital camera are 640 pixels wide x 480 pixels tall.

Slide 3 of 13

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Resolution

  • “Resolution” refers to how small and close together the pixels or dots are.

  • The higher the resolution, the more dots there are per inch, and the “clearer” the picture.

  • A common screen resolution is 72 pixels per inch.

  • 300 dots per inch and greater resolutions are commonly used on scanners and printers for higher quality images.

Slide 4 of 13

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Line Art (monochrome images)

  • “Line Art” (monochrome) images consist of pixels that are either on or off, so they only require one bit of storage space per image pixel.

Slide 5 of 13

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Grayscale

  • “Grayscale” images consist of pixels which can be various shades of gray.

  • 8-bit Grayscale images can have 256 different shades of gray and require one byte of storage space per image pixel.

Slide 6 of 13

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Halftone

  • “Halftone” gives the effect of shading by using various patterns of dot groupings, as is commonly seen in newspaper images.

Slide 7 of 13

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RGB Color

  • “RGB” stands for “Red-Green-Blue”, the three primary colors of light. By combining various intensities of each of these colors, any color can be created.

Slide 8 of 13

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Slide 9 of 13

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Image Compression describe the intensity of each primary color, giving over 16 million possible colors requiring three bytes of storage space per pixel.

  • If not “compressed”, a 640 by 480, 24-bit RGB color image will require:640 x 480 x 3 = 921,600 bytes of memory.

  • Images are commonly “compressed” so that they will require less storage space and so they will download quicker.

  • Compression usually results in a reduction in image quality.

Slide 10 of 13

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Some Common Image Formats describe the intensity of each primary color, giving over 16 million possible colors requiring three bytes of storage space per pixel.

  • JPEG - Compressed image format for photographic type images with many colors (common on web).

  • GIF - Used for Clip Art and Icons or images with limited colors (common on web).

  • PNG - (Portable Network Graphic) Can be used for images on the web requiring transparency.

  • TIFF - A high-quality photographic image format.

  • BMP - A photographic format common on the PC.

  • PICT - A photographic format common on the Mac.

Slide 11 of 13

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“Raster” vs. “Vector” Graphics describe the intensity of each primary color, giving over 16 million possible colors requiring three bytes of storage space per pixel.

  • "Raster" images are "Pixel-Based", with the color of each pixel individually defined.

  • Using "Paint tools" you can select, manipulate, and edit individual pixels in a Raster Image.

  • Raster graphics cannot be scaled to a higher resolution without a loss of quality.

  • Raster graphics are more appropriate for free-form or artistic images such as photographs.

Slide 12 of 13

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Vector Graphics describe the intensity of each primary color, giving over 16 million possible colors requiring three bytes of storage space per pixel.

  • "Vector" graphics are "Object-Oriented", utilizing geometric objects such as curves and polygons to represent an image.

  • Using "Draw tools" you can select, manipulate, and edit geometric objects in a Vector Graphic.

  • Vector graphics can be easily scaled to a higher resolution without loss of quality.

  • Vector graphics are more appropriate for graphic design and technical illustration where precision and scalability is important, such as Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD).

Slide 13 of 13

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