Comp414 course introduction
Download
1 / 20

COMP414 Course Introduction - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


COMP414 Course Introduction. Advanced Networking Course coordinator: Peter Komisarczuk. Outline. Who Peter Komisarczuk (Course dis-organizer) Co 334 (Tel: 04 463 5661, peterk@mcs.vuw.ac.nz ) Andy Linton, Teaching Fellow, Co 330, 04 463 5657, What Lectures/Seminars/Tutorials (35)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha

Download Presentation

COMP414 Course Introduction

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


COMP414Course Introduction

Advanced Networking

Course coordinator:

Peter Komisarczuk

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


Outline

  • Who

    • Peter Komisarczuk (Course dis-organizer)

    • Co 334 (Tel: 04 463 5661, peterk@mcs.vuw.ac.nz)

    • Andy Linton, Teaching Fellow, Co 330, 04 463 5657,

  • What

    • Lectures/Seminars/Tutorials (35)

    • Assignments (3)

    • Labs (5)

    • Exam (1)

  • Where and When

    • See course documents

    • Time for lab sessions to be arranged, also change of one session?

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


Learning Outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge and understanding of networking through study of:

    • Internet and Next Generation Networks

    • Network Technology

    • Network and Internet Service Provider drivers and concerns (Telco’s and ISP’s)

  • Developing/enhancing skills in

    • Analysis of network protocols and architecture

    • Research and/or practical skills

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


Course Requirement

  • Lecture/seminar handouts will be provided

  • A number of papers will be required reading

  • The course demands 10 to 12 hours average work per week

  • 50% of marks split between four assignments

    • One research essay

    • Analytical analysis of protocols/networks (numerical)

    • Labs (5 of them)

    • Seminars (presentation and report)

  • 50% of marks on final exam (see formats for 2003 to 2007)

  • Must gain 50% overall to pass the course

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


COMP 414 Advanced Networking

  • Prerequisites:

    • COMP 306/204 – 30 points at 300 level

  • Course focus: Next Generation Internet/Networks: “Convergence to IP”

    • Drivers/Rationale - New Services, Advances in Networking Technology

    • Network Technologies and Architectures

    • Quality of Service, multimedia protocols, policy routing

    • Voice Service Architecture (PSTN/IN migrating to “SoftSwitch”)

    • Next Generation Internet, broadband deployment

    • Internet Middleware

    • Management of Next Generation Networks

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


COMP 414 Reading List

  • Free: IBM Redbook TCP/IP Tutorial and Technical Overview. PDF document of > 900 pages – see COMP414 webpage

  • General good books for reference/background:

    • Kurose and Ross, Computer Networking, 3/e or 4/e

    • W. Stallings, Data & Computer Communications, 6/e and 7/e

    • W. Stallings, High-Speed Networks and Intranets 2/e

    • A. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, 4/e

    • Christian Huitema, Routing in the Internet, 2/e

  • IETF RFC’s and drafts, IEEE/ACM publications, etc. (See web site resources page for useful sources of information)

  • Whitepapers from various communications companies: e.g. Cisco Systems, Juniper Networks, etc., the ACM, IEEE, IET and other journal or conference material

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


Introductory Papers

[1] Mohamed El-Sayed, Jeffrey Jaffe, A View of Telecommunications Network Evolution, IEEE, Comms Magazine, December 2002

[2] M H Reeve, C Bilton, P E Holmes, M Bross, Networks And Systems For BT In The 21st Century, IEE Communication Engineer, October/ November 2005

BT = British Telecom (known as 21CN)

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


Rationale for 21CN?

  • Replace many “stove-pipe” single service networks with a single “converged” network

    • Remove multiple OSS (operational support systems) – large $ savings

    • (Management, billing, customer care, etc.)

    • Avoids “interworking” issues - large $ savings

  • Create new opportunities (services) and faster service enablement (provisioning

    • Intelligence layer and application platforms

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


BT 21CN “New Architecture”

Figures

from [2]

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


21CN Physical Network Architecture

NTE – Network termination Equipment

BRAS - Broadband Remote Access Server

Figures

from [2]

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


Network Provider Architecture

  • Access Network – “first mile” or “last mile”

  • Aggregation Network

    • (Metropolitan Network)

  • Metro Office Node (IP Services Node or sometimes called aggregation router)

  • Backhaul Network

    • Regional Network

    • Backbone (or core) Network

    • Inter-network transit points

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


21CN Service Execution Network

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9

Figures

from [2]


Service Extensions

  • Legacy service encapsulation

  • Mobility Services (session, user, and terminal mobility)

  • Multimedia Services (voice, video, data)

  • Hosting Services (e.g. VoD)

  • ICT Services (outsourcing of infrastructure hardware (terminal and hosting) and software [application] service providers)

  • Connectivity Services (IP VPN, Ethernet services, optical services, etc.)

  • Third Party Services (open interfaces, APIs)

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


Main Principles

  • All services over IP

    • Edge adaptation, IP, MPLS, optical core

      • Multi-Service Access Node (edge)

      • Metro Node (IP Service Node or BRAS)

    • Quality of Service (QOS) support

  • Mobile and fixed network integration

  • Middleware

    • 3GPP (3rd generation partnership project) IMS (IP Multimedia Subsystem)

    • Reusable service components (SOA)

  • One touch support systems (OSS)

    • Workflow engine, component orchestration

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9


Next Generation Networks and Convergence

Figures taken from Reference 1

© IEEE

Optical: technology driver =

higher capacity (push and pull),

longer distance transmission,

dynamic capacity allocation architectures

and integration with other services

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9

[1] Mohamed El-Sayed, Jeffrey Jaffe, A View of telecommunications Network Evolution, IEEE, Comms Magazine, December 2002


Next Generation Networks and Convergence

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9

© IEEE, reference 1


Next Generation Networks and Convergence

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9

© IEEE, reference 1


Next Generation Networks and Convergence

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9

© IEEE, reference 1


Next Generation Networks and Convergence

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9

© IEEE, reference 1


Next Generation Networks and Convergence

© Peter Komisarczuk, VUW, 2003-9

© IEEE, reference 1


ad
  • Login