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COMM 3353: Communication Web Technologies I . Chapter 3a: Internet Radio. www.class.uh.edu/comm/classes/comm3353/ppt/_Pres3a.html. Internet Radio. The Growth of Internet Radio Internet Radio Versus Over-The-Air Radio Real-Time Audio Netcasting Networks Cybercasting Radio Stations.

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COMM 3353:Communication Web Technologies I

  • Chapter 3a:

    • Internet Radio

www.class.uh.edu/comm/classes/comm3353/ppt/_Pres3a.html


Internet radio l.jpg
Internet Radio

  • The Growth of Internet Radio

  • Internet Radio Versus Over-The-Air Radio

  • Real-Time Audio

  • Netcasting Networks

  • Cybercasting Radio Stations


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The Growth of Internet Radio

  • The Internet provides the ability to own, program, and operate a radio station with relative ease

  • December 1994: KU Student-run radio first to go live on the Internet

  • September 5, 1995: Birth of “Live” Internet Audio with sports netcast

  • September 9, 1995: Dallas KLIF-AM first commercial station on the Internet full-time.


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The Growth ofInternet Radio, continued…

  • Rise of Internet Radio and Over-the-Air Radio

    • Similar development

      • HAM (amateur radio operators) turned into commercial radio

      • Amateur netcasters paved the way for professional, commercial web radio

    • Internet Radio is becoming increasingly noticeable in the communication industry, although it has a long way to go


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Internet Radio vs. Over-The-Air Radio

  • Over-Air radio use is slowly decreasing among internet users and IT professionals.

    • Amount of time spent listening to radio has decreased as a result of time spent surfing.

    • Reciprocity rather than accommodation.

      • Now a general move toward accommodation.

      • With this move comes the demand for faster, more reliable service


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Internet Radio vs. Over-The-Air Radio, continued…

  • Benefits of Internet Radio

    • Potentially better than Over-Air Radio

      • Web audio files can be accessed at any time, regardless of when first aired

      • Netcasts can be listened to anywhere in the world, regardless of origin

      • Netcasts include visual and sound stimulus as well as printed text.

      • Allows Multitasking


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Internet Radio vs. Over-The-Air Radio, continued…

  • Challenges of Internet Radio

    • Sound Quality

      • Based on connectivity

    • Biggest problem with Internet Radio

    • Main reason adoption is slow

  • Download delay

    • A 15 min. audio program can take 1-2 hours to download

      • Although it’s getting increasingly quicker


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Internet Radio vs. Over-The-Air Radio, continued…

  • Challenges of Internet Radio, Cont.

    • Limited number of server connections at any given time

      • Licensing (NT, Novel, etc.)

        • Per connection user rate

      • Software capability (NT Workstation)

        • Only allows 10 simultaneous connections

    • Lack of portability

      • No network connection on the beach


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Internet Radio vs. Over-The-Air Radio, continued…

  • Challenges of Internet Radio, Cont.

    • Portability, Cont.

      • Recent Dateline NBC interview with Bill Gates

        • Microsoft’s Billion Dollar R&D

        • Satellite technology beaming signal directly into cars and portable lap tops

      • The cars of the future will have console style computers, resembling a car radio, which will allow radio listing and email access, among other things.


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Real Time Audio

  • RealAudio

    • First application to bring real-time audio-on-demand over the internet.

    • Uses streaming technology to transmit live, real-time, continuous audio

      • STREAMING: technology that sends data through the net in a continuous flow so that information is displayed on a user’s computer before the entire file is downloaded

    • Since inception, many radio stations have adopted netcast technologies


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Real Time Audio, Continued…

  • RealAudio, Cont.

    • Does not require a great deal of computing expertise

    • Relatively inexpensive

    • With RealAudio, users (surfers) do not have to wait for big audio files to download, but rather get data seemingly instantaneously


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Real Time Audio, Continued…

  • Internet Sound has actually been available since mid ‘80s.

    • Problematic due to packet-switching errors and long download times

  • RealAudio developed UDP (User Datagram Protocol)

    • Works just like (and in conjunction with) TCP/IP, except eliminates the “talking” between computers


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Real Time Audio, Continued…

  • MPEG (Motion Pictures Experts Group)

    • Compresses graphic and sound files for internet transmission

      • Quicker because files are 1/10th normal size

      • Files must be decompressed once received by the user

  • RTSP (Real-Time Streaming Protocol)

    • Industry standard for streaming

    • RTSP is to Audio what HTML is to Text

      • In other words, RTSP is expected to be the primary audio programming protocol


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Real Time Audio, Continued…

  • Multicasting

    • Technology that allows one audio file to be sent out to multiple receivers at any given time, rather than point-to-point file delivery


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Real Time Audio, Continued…

  • How does Real-Time Audio Work?

    • Encoder vs. Player

      • RealAudio Encoder is used to send audio netcasts over the internet

      • RealAudio Player is the software technology used to receive encoded audio files and display them in a format understood by the user.


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Real Time Audio, Continued…

  • RealAudio Encoder

    • Digitizes audio files for data packet and Real-Time player compatibility

    • Uses streaming and a buffer scheme to send digitized binary audio files

    • Generally associated with the server side of media streaming


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Real Time Audio, Continued…

  • RealAudio Player

    • Decodes digitized audio sent from the server, initially created by RealAudio Encoder.

    • Greatly reduces waiting time for downloaded audio files

    • Generally associated with client side media steaming


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Netcasting Networks

  • Radio vs. Netcast Networks

    • Radio Networks

      • A Radio Network supplies radio stations with programming, news, commercials.

      • Ex. Westwood One, ABC, etc.

    • Netcast Networks

      • Derived from parent radio networks

      • Assist radio stations with developing online sites

      • Supplies netcast stations with current, breaking news, weather, sports, etc

      • Ex. ABC RadioNet, CBS Radio Networks Online


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Netcasting Networks, Continued…

  • Netcast Networks, Cont.

    • In addition to general support, some netcasts offer real-time cybercasts

      • Ex. ABC RadioNet’s OJ Simpson trial, Bill Clinton’s Presidential Radio Address

    • Netcast Networks use streaming technology to deliver real-time news, in some cases quicker than conventional media methods.


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Cybercasting RadioStations

  • Broadcast Stations on the Web

    • Can excel online by providing the only radio link to locations unable to receive conventional radio signals.

    • Allow users to select any radio station, anywhere in the world

    • Could result in new arena for competition as Broadcast Stations attempt to attract new advertising markets


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Cybercasting RadioStations, Continued…

  • Broadcast Stations on the Web, Cont.

    • Radio Web Sites compete with local radio stations and newsprint by providing consumer information and advertising

      • The larger the audience, the greater the market, the greater the advertising dollar share

    • Web Radio keeps the public informed

      • Used as a “tie-in” to promotional events by allowing a larger audience to “attend” than physically possible


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Cybercasting RadioStations, Continued…

  • Broadcast Stations on the Web, Cont.

    • Deciding what should be on a Radio Station's Web Site:

      • Internet Radio

      • Station profile

      • Photos of on-air personalities

      • Program schedule and Play List

      • Method of feedback (email)

      • Downloadable audio clips

      • DJ Biographies


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Cybercasting RadioStations, Continued…

  • Broadcast Stations on the Web, Cont.

    • Internet Radio makes a radio station “Global”

      • Netcasting allows for an unlimited audience

    • A radio station’s profit margin can be inflated by offering enhanced advertising packages to virtually any company in the world, provided the Web Radio Site is popular enough.


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The Internet and theWorld Wide Web

  • End Chapter 3, Part I.


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