parliamentary procedure

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parliamentary procedure

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1. Introduction to Parliamentary Procedure - Venturing edition

3. Democracy in action!! Parliamentary Procedure is…

4. Crew “Business” Meetings should be run following parliamentary procedure. Teen Leader Council/Venturing Officer Association meetings should be run following parliamentary procedure. Why do I need to know it?

5. EVERYONE!!! Officers. Advisors. Members. When all know & follow it, meetings can go much smoother. Who needs to know it?

6. Some are resistant to parliamentary procedure due to misunderstanding of what it entails. Such as: “parliamentary procedure is just ‘red tape’ that slows down meetings” “parliamentary tricks can allow someone to get their way or stay in power” “making bylaws ambiguous or hard to obtain minimizes problems” Myths of Parliamentary Procedure This is why everyone needs to know parliamentary procedure!!This is why everyone needs to know parliamentary procedure!!

7. These myths are why its important that all members know and follow parliamentary procedure. Knowledge of parliamentary procedure is not just for the chair or parliamentarian, but for every member. Myths, cont’d

8. Meetings. Minutes. Decision Making (Motions & Voting). Elections/Nominations. Bylaws and other Rules. Parliamentary Authorities. Elements of Parliamentary Procedure

9. Call to Order Reading of Minutes Treasurer’s Report Officer/Committee Reports Special Orders Old Business New Business Announcements Adjournment Meeting Agenda

10. Call to Order- if quorum present, chair calls meeting to order. Reading of Minutes- secretary “reads” a record of previous meeting. Treasurer’s Report. Officer/Committee Reports. Special Orders- important business that must be considered at this meeting. Elements of Agenda If weekly meeting, Treasurer’s report is not necessary every meeting, unless a change occursIf weekly meeting, Treasurer’s report is not necessary every meeting, unless a change occurs

11. Old Business- deal with matters left undone at previous meeting. New Business- new topics are introduced. They need not be stated on agenda. Announcements- information for group. Adjournment- close the meeting. Elements of Agenda

12. Why are they important? They are the official records of the decisions made by the organization. Minutes record what was decided, not said. What should be done with them? “read” at next meeting to verify accuracy. Added to records of the organization. “published” to general membership for their knowledge. Available to all members. Minutes On “reading” of minutes: if members are given copies of minutes prior to meeting and they reviewed it, the secretary need not actually read an overview of them, but if members need to correct them, they should state this.On “reading” of minutes: if members are given copies of minutes prior to meeting and they reviewed it, the secretary need not actually read an overview of them, but if members need to correct them, they should state this.

13. Members get their say thru MOTIONS Four general types of motions: Main Motions Subsidiary Motions Privileged Motions Incidental Motions Decision Making

14. Introduce subjects for consideration. They can not be made when another motion is being considered. They yield to privileged, subsidiary, and incidental motions. Example: “I move that we increase dues to $25 per year.” Main Motions

15. Change or affect the main motion being considered. They are voted on before the main motion. Example: “I move that we amend the motion of increasing dues to $30 instead of $25 per year.” or “I move that we strike $25 and replace it with $30.” Subsidiary Motions

16. Concern special or important matters not related to pending business. They are generally considered before other types of motions. Examples: “I move we adjourn”, “I move we recess for 5 minutes”, “I rise to a question of privilege [complain about heat, noise, etc.].” Privileged Motions

17. Deal with question of procedure that arise from other motions. They must be considered before other types of motions. Examples: “Appeal the decision of the chair”, “Point of order [complain about improper behavior]”, “Point of information”, “I move to suspend rules for the purpose of…” Incidental Motions

18. Present your motion “I move that …” It is seconded “Second” Chair repeats it “It has been moved and seconded that we…” Debate it “I think that …” Debate is ended “Are you ready for the question?” Put it to the vote “All those in favor…” How do motions work? Seconding means only that someone agrees the body should consider the motion, it does not mean that member agrees with it. A second is not needed if debate has begun on the motion Some parliamentary authorities do not require a second. Seconding means only that someone agrees the body should consider the motion, it does not mean that member agrees with it. A second is not needed if debate has begun on the motion Some parliamentary authorities do not require a second.

19. Is in in order? It must be related to the business at hand, and presented at the right time and not be obstructive or frivolous. May I interrupt the speaker? If it is important. The original speaker then regains the floor. F.A.Q. about Motions

20. Do I need a second? Usually yes. This indicates that others feel the motion should be considered. However, if debate has begin before a second, its assumed there was a second. Is it debatable? Usually yes. Some motions can not be. But there are limits to how long and how often. F.A.Q. about Motions

21. Can it be amended? The main motion being considered can be. Amendments must be dealt with first. What vote is needed? Most need only majority, but some need 2/3. Unless specified by bylaws, voice vote is fine. Can it be reconsidered? Some motions can be, but this must be agreed to by the winning side. F.A.Q. about Motions

22. Motions at a glance

23. Motions at a glance, cont’d

24. Fix the time to adjourn Move to adjourn Recess Question of Privilege (complain) Table motion Previous Question (end debate & decide) Postpone Discussion Refer to Committee Amend Main motion Precedence of Motions Main motion is lowest form. Those above are higherMain motion is lowest form. Those above are higher

25. Point of Order Appeal chair’s decision Suspend the rules Object to consideration Division (verify voice vote) Point of Information Take from the table Reconsider a vote Non-precedence motions

26. Different methods to vote: Voice (usual method, if outcome unclear, member may ask for a “division” to verify with standing vote). Show of hands. Roll call. Ballot. General consent (consent shown by silence, if any objection, must be voted). What method is used may be determined in bylaws for different situations. Voting

27. There is no standard way of running elections. Each organization will define its method in its bylaws. Some organizations will use “Nominating Committees” to nominate a slate of officers. Members can still nominate from the floor. Elections/nominations

28. Typical way of Elections: Accept nominations from floor for office. Close nominations when apparent there are no more. Nominees make short speech. Vote on nominees. Repeat with next office until all positions filled. Elections/Nominations cont’d

29. Bylaws document how an organization is run. While there exists standard templates, each organization modifies this to fit their needs. Organizations which have a parent organization may need to conform to their rules.This document should be modified as needed, and be available to all so they understand what it contains. Bylaws

30. Each Crew is recommended to develop their own bylaws. A template is provided in the Venturing Leader Manual, pg 37 and in the Sea Scout Manual, pg 39. Each Crew should be mindful that BSA policies take precedence over their policies. Bylaws in Venturing

31. Article I: Name Article II: Object Article III: Members Article IV: Officers Article V: Meetings Article VI: Executive Board Article VII: Committees Article VIII: Parliamentary Authority Article IX: Amendment of Bylaws Bylaws template (RONR) This is taken from RONR. Other works have different templates.This is taken from RONR. Other works have different templates.

32. Gives the official name of the organization. Article I: Name

33. A brief paragraph explaining the purpose of the organization. Article II: Object

34. Classes of membership (active, association, honorary) with eligibility requirements, rights, privileges. Requirements of parent organization. Procedure for membership application. Removal of membership. Should not specify amount of dues. Article III: Members

35. List of officers Method of selection Duties of each officer Method of filling vacancies (succession) Removal of officers Article IV: Officers

36. Types of meetings specified: Annual Regular Special Specified the purposes of these meetings Should not specify date/time/location of meetings Article V: Meetings

37. Purpose of Board Membership of Board Meetings of Board Article VI: Executive Board

38. Specifies the committees that will exist within the organization. Committees are “Standing” (permanent) or “Select” (short term). Details the purpose of the committees, who chairs, determines membership, etc. Committees are important, as the bulk of the organization’s work is done in them. Article VII: Committees

39. Specifies the published parliamentary work that will be used by the organization (Robert’s Rules of Order, The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure, etc.). Article VIII: Parliamentary Authority

40. Specifies the methods by which the bylaws are altered. Changes to bylaws are put forth to the membership in a formal method that shows the changes desired and why the change is needed. Article specifies how the organization will decide on this change. Article IX: Amendment of Bylaws

41. Finance Supremacy Clause (BSA policy over Crew’s) Election Procedure Awards Other elements of Articles could be stand alone articles (Disciplinary action, etc.) Other Articles

42. Many organizations have other rules they may need to document. Some may be incorporated as additional articles to bylaws. Some may be incorporated in additional documents called “Standing Rules” or “Special Rules”. Only those rules dealing with how the organization is run should be in bylaws. Other Rules of the Organization

43. Amount of dues. Time/place of meetings. Awards (if not in bylaws). Possible Standing Rules

44. These are works that define parliamentary procedure. Includes: Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised, 10th edition (RONR). The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure, 4th edition (TSC). Modern Parliamentary Procedure. Majority Rules. others. Parliamentary Authorities

45. While each authority has similar elements, they differ in language and in available motions. Bylaws should specify the authority used. Organization can have specific rules of order. These supercede any parliamentary authority. Parliamentary Authorities

46. National Association of Parliamentarians www.parliamentarians.org American Institute of Parliamentarians www.parliamentaryprocedure.org Sources of Information

47. Venturing Leader Manual, #34655B, revised 2000 Sources of Venturing-specific Information

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