slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
"Just What is it that makes today\'s home so different, so appealing?" (1956) - Richard Hamilton

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

Metafiction - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 341 Views
  • Uploaded on

"Just What is it that makes today\'s home so different, so appealing?" (1956) - Richard Hamilton. Postmodernism: Significant Events August 6, 1945 - atomic explosion over Hiroshima, Japan The conclusion of World War II The Korean War (Conflict?) The Cold War of the 1950s

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Metafiction' - Michelle


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

Postmodernism: Significant Events

  • August 6, 1945 - atomic explosion over Hiroshima, Japan The conclusion of World War II
  • The Korean War (Conflict?)
  • The Cold War of the 1950s
  • McCarthyism and the House Un-American Activities Committee
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962
  • The assassination of President Kennedy, Nov. 1962 Identity Movements of the 1960s: Feminism, Civil Rights/Black Power
  • The assassinations, in 1968, of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy
slide3

Postmodernism: Significant Events (con’t)

  • The Vietnam War (Conflict?)
  • The killing of four students by the National Guard at Kent State Univ., 1970
  • The resignation of President Nixon in 1974
  • The AIDS epidemic
  • Identity Movements: Gay, Lesbian, Queer movements, Postcolonial movements and minority literature.
  • The rise of Theory
  • Culture Wars: debates over canonical inclusion and “great books”
slide4

Postmodernism Samples (from Jameson)

John Ashbery -- David Antin

Pop Buildings

Pop Art, Conceptual Art, Photorealism

John Cage, Philip Glass, the Clash, Talking Heads, Gang of Four

Vanguard film: Godard, etc. to Hollywood “nostalgia film”

Fiction: Burroughs, Pychnon, DeLillo, French new novel

Other samples?

slide5

Still Life with a Bottle of Rum, Summer 1911

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973)

Oil on canvas; 24 1/8 x 19 7/8 in. (61.3 x 50.5 cm)

slide12

Recurrent Ideas in Theory

(from:Barry, Peter. Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. Second Edition. Manchester, 2002)

Anti-essentialism—many of the notions previously regarded as universal and fixed (gender identity, individual selfhood) are actually fluid and unstable. These are socially constructed or contingent categories rather than absolute or essential ones.

All thinking and investigation is affected by prior ideological commitments. There is no disinterested enquiry.

“Language itself conditions, limits, and predetermines what we see. Language doesn’t record reality but constructs it. Meaning in texts is jointly constructed by the reader and writer.

4. “Theorists distrust all totalizing notions” (great books, human nature)

slide13

Barry sums these ideas up in 5 key points:

politics is pervasive

language is constituative

Truth is provisional

Meaning is contingent

Human nature is a myth.

metafiction
Metafiction

“Metafiction is a term given to fictional writing which self-consciously and systematically draws attention to its status as an artifact in order to pose questions about the relationship between fiction and reality. In providing a critique of their own methods of construction, such writings not only examine the fundamental structures of narrative fiction, they also explore the possible fictionality of the world outside the literary fictional text.”

(Patricia Waugh, courtesy of Patrick)

david lodge 4 techniques typical of pm fiction
David Lodge: 4 Techniques Typical of PM Fiction
  • Permutation: incorporating alternative narrative lines in the same text
  • Discontinuity: disrupting the continuity, unity, “reality” of the text (by unpredictable swerves of tone, metafictional asides to the reader, blank spaces in the text, etc).
  • Randomness: discontinuity produced by composing accord to the logic of the absurd
  • Excess: as a method of departing from or testing the bounds of “reality”
the babysitter fragments
“The Babysitter” fragments

“a scream” a fight “Stop it!”

“Decides to take a quick bath” a golf club

a pair of underpants “are you being a good girl?”

“Dolly!” “Where’s Harry?” “peeping in”

“Hey! What’s going on here?” “Harry?”

“I’m just wrapped in a towel”

“I’ll spank!” “Something about a babysitter…”

a ringing telephone

“Maybe you better get in the tub too”

“They’re all dead”