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Relating Ethnicity and Culture to Healthcare Marketing. August 8, 2003. Pamela L. Schneider Senior VP, Client Services Director Rick Johnson & Company, Inc. Our Agency Has a Plethora of Healthcare Experience. Integrated Health Systems Hospitals Managed Care Physician Specialty Groups

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slide3

Our Agency Has a Plethora of Healthcare Experience

  • Integrated Health Systems
  • Hospitals
  • Managed Care
  • Physician Specialty Groups
  • Clinics and Solo Practitioners
  • Recruitment and Retention
  • Community Healthcare Leadership
  • The list goes on…
slide5

Let’s Begin Today by

Discussing Some Statistics

slide6

Percent of Persons Who Are American Indian and Alaskan Native by County in New Mexico

36.9% to 74.7% Includes: San Juan, McKinley and Cibola Counties

10.9 – 16.3% Includes: Rio Arriba, Sandoval and Socorro Counties

Source: United States Census Bureau Data: www.census.gov

NOTE: Bernalillo County – 13.5% of NM NA pop. or 23,623

slide7

Percent of Persons who are Hispanic or Latino by County in New Mexico

72.9 – 81.6% Includes: Rio Arriba, Mora, San Miguel and Gaudalupe Counties

44.9 – 63.4% Includes: Taos, Colfax, Harding, Santa Fe, Valencia and Socorro as well as Grant, Hidalgo, Luna and Dona Ana Counties

Source: United States Census Bureau Data: www.census.gov

Note: Bernalillo County is 30.4% of NM Pop. or 236,285

slide8

Percent of Persons who are Anglo in New Mexico by County

Source: United States Census Bureau Data: www.census.gov

slide9

U.S. Census Data on Nativity and Language Proficiency in New Mexico

Source: United States Census Bureau Data: www.census.gov

slide10

U.S. Census Data on Nativity and Language Proficiency in New Mexico

Source: United States Census Bureau Data: www.census.gov

slide12

10 LEADING CAUSES OF DEATH IN THE AMERICAN INDIAN

Source: The Center for Disease Control Website: www.webapp.cdc.gov

slide13

10 LEADING CAUSES OF DEATH IN THE HISPANIC POPULATION

Source: The Center for Disease Control Website: www.webapp.cdc.gov

slide14

Our DMA is One of the Top 15 Hispanic Markets in the Country

Market%/TV HouseholdsHispanic Rank

Los Angeles 30% (1,585,390) 1

New York 15% (1,100,030) 2

Miami-Ft. Lauderdale 37% (550,190) 3

Houston 22% (399,220) 4

Chicago 12% (384,140) 5

Dallas-Ft. Worth 15% (324,120) 6

San Antonio 44% (317,810) 7

San Francisco – Oak- SJ 13% (317,200) 8

Phoenix 16% (246,160) 9

Harl-Wslco-Brns-Mca 81% (232,270) 10

Albuquerque-Santa Fe 33% (206,710)11

Source: 2003 Nielsen Universe Estimates

slide15

Approximately 38% of the DMA Population is Hispanic

Total DMA Population 1,597,000

Hispanic Percentage 38%

Hispanic Population 602,000

Non-Hispanic Percentage 62%

Non-Hispanic Population 995,000

Source: 2003 Nielsen Universe Estimates

slide16

Hispanics Growing Twice as Fast as Non-Hispanics

A Rapidly Growing Population

19902000% Change

Hispanic 579,224 785,386 32%

Non-Hispanic 935,845 1,053,660 13%

Source: 1990 and 2000 Census (New Mexico state population

slide17

More Than Four Out of Five Hispanic

Households Speak Spanish

Speak Spanish 82%

Speak English Only 18%

Source: 2003 Nielsen Universe Estimates

slide18

More Than Four Out of Five Hispanic

Households Speak Spanish

  • Conveying your message to your target audience is accomplished most effectively in theirlanguage of comfort.
  • The language of comfort is the language spoken at home.
  • Spanish-language dominant Hispanics think and feel in Spanish.

Source: 2003 Nielsen Universe Estimates

it s about reaching them with relevance
It’s About Reaching Them with Relevance
  • It’s necessary to connect with target consumers
    • Emotionally
    • Rationally
    • Intellectually
    • Culturally
  • To connect in these ways, you must know about their level of acculturation
acculturation not assimilation
Acculturation, Not Assimilation
  • Assimilation:
    • A group leaves culture and customs behind and adopts culture and customs of another group
  • Acculturation:
    • A group adopts or borrows customs and traits from another culture
acculturation is defined as
Acculturation is Defined as…
  • “Change resulting from contact between cultures”
  • “The process by which people adopt or borrow customs and traits from another culture”
  • “A merging of cultures as a result of prolonged contact”
  • “Mutual influence of different cultures in close contact”

Source: “Acculturation” Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2000

Strategy Research Corp.

Webster New World Dictionary, Third College Edition

slide24

Latino Acculturation Values (L.A.V.s.)™

UNACCULTURATED ACCULTURATED

Success:

Family/group

satisfaction

Success;

Personal

Achievement

Class

distinction/

authority

Obedience/

attached to traditions

Freedom/

open to change

Equality

Individualism

Collectivism

Avoidance

of direct

confrontation

Assertiveness/

aggressiveness

Cooperation/

respect

Competition

Control

over destiny

Fatalism

slide25

Latino Acculturation Stratification

UNACCULTURATED

ACCULTURATED

CROSSCULTURER

CULTURAL

LOYALIST

CULTURAL

EMBRACER

CULTURALINTEGRATORS

(TM)

  • U.S. Born
  • 2nd, 3rd Generation
  • English
  • Preferred
  • Latino Proud
  • Retro-acculturation
  • Influential
  • Foreign Born
  • Resident
  • Spanish
  • Preferred
  • Professional
  • Aspirational
  • Foreign Born
  • Recent arrival
  • Spanish
  • dependent
  • Traditional values
  • U.S. Born
  • First generation
  • Bilingual &
  • Bicultural
  • Professional
  • Fashion-forward
  • In touch with roots
albuquerque is highly acculturated market
Albuquerque is Highly Acculturated Market
  • Top 3 Most Acculturated Markets in U.S.:
    • San Antonio
    • Albuquerque
    • San Francisco
acculturation among ha 18 albuquerque
Acculturation Among HA 18+ - Albuquerque

Source: Strategy Research Corp.

Source: Strategic Research Corp. 2002

factors influencing acculturation
Factors Influencing Acculturation
  • Employment
  • Length of Residency in U.S.
  • Language Use/Preference (home and work)
  • Birthplace of Parents
  • Education
  • Generation U.S. Born (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc)
  • Media Preferences (Spanish or English)
  • Values and Attitudes
slide30

Research Shows…

  • Advertising to Hispanics in English is not as effective as speaking to them in Spanish
  • Spanishlanguagecommercials have better ad recall. (61%)
  • Hispanics have better comprehension of Spanish-language commercials (57%).
  • Spanish commercials are 4.5% times more influential in making purchases decisions.

Source: Roslow Research Group Inc., Spanish vs English Advertising Effectiveness Among Hispanics 2000

slide31

Ethnicity is defined as:rel: of, relating to, or originating from the traits shared by members of a group as a product of their common heredity and cultural tradition(s)

slide32

Culture is defined as syn:breeding, cultivation, polish, refinementrel: development, education, learning; enlightenment; refinement, breeding, erudition, manners, class

slide34

“Hispanic”

  • The term “Hispanic” was created by the U.S. Census Bureau in 1970 as an ethnic category for persons who identify themselves as being of Spanish origin.
  • “Hispanic” denotes neither race nor color, and a Hispanic may be White, Black or American Indian
  • Many members of the younger Hispanic population demographic now prefer the term “Latino”.
slide35

“Hispanic”

  • The classification “Hispanic” includes people of many different origins and cultures.
  • Although there is a unifying thread of language and some cultural similarities inherited from the Spanish settlers – There is also a tremendous variety within the Hispanic community
slide37

Show respeto –

  • People from many Hispanic cultures offer (and expect to receive) deference on the basis of age, sex and status.
  • Patients will naturally offer respeto to the health provider, an authority figure with high social, educational, and economic status.
  • In return, patients rightfully expect to be treated with respect.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide38

The Healthcare Provider Shows respeto by:

  • Addressing Adults by title and family name (Mr./Señor, Mrs./Señora Y, or Madam/Doña)
  • Shaking hands at the beginning of each meeting.
  • Using usted rather than the informal tu for “you”, when speaking Spanish.
  • Making eye contact, without necessarily expecting reciprocation, since some (especially rural) patients may consider it disrespectful to look the health provider, an authority figure, in the eye.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide39

The Healthcare Provider Shows respeto by:

  • Speaking directly to the patient, even when speaking through an interpreter.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide40

Show personalismo.

  • Patients from many Hispanic cultures expect to establish a personal, one-on-one relationship – not to be confused with an informal relationship – with the health provider.
  • Although establishing a relationship based onpersonalismomay seem time-consuming, it can actually save time and prevent negative outcomes.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide41

The Healthcare Provider Shows personalismo by:

  • Treating patients in a warm and friendly – but not unduly informal – manner.
  • Showing genuine interest in and concern for patients by asking them about themselves and their family.
  • Sitting close, leaning forward and using gestures when speaking with the patient.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide42

Involve the Family in Decision Making and Care.

  • Families are a source of emotional and physical support and are expected to participate in important medical decisions.
  • The definition of “la familia” is much broader in most Hispanic cultures than in Anglo cultures
  • La familia may show loyalty and support by gathering at the hospital.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide43

Accept a different sense of time.

  • Many people from Hispanic cultures have what might be called a “global” or “indefinite” sense of time – rather than an exact sense of day and hour – in making and keeping appointments.
  • Similarly in presenting a complaint, they may not be able to attach a specific calendar date to the onset or conclusion of a medical complaint or an event.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide44

Accept a different sense of time.

  • They may instead be able to link the event to a season, a phase of the moon, or a particular occurrence, such as a holiday or celebration.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide45

Take pains to establish understanding and agreement.

  • Many patients’ sense of respect for authority may cause them to avoid conflict or confrontation with the health provider by saying too readily that they understand how to take a medication or will follow a treatment plan.
  • The health provider must ensure that understanding is achieved and must try to gain real acceptance of the treatment plan and a commitment to follow it.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide46

Respect the spiritual side of physical complaints.

  • Many Hispanic patients complain that health practitioners, by discounting supernatural and psychological causes of complaints, offer only a fragmentary approach to care.
  • To these patients, this amounts to treating the symptoms, not the disease itself.
  • Practitioners are advised to ask their patients what they believe to be the cause of a complaint and to refrain from ridiculing or discounting the patient’s belief in supernatural or psychological causes.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide47

Potential Culture-Related Health Concerns Among Hispanic Populations

Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page

slide48

Persons from some Hispanic cultures may have tendency toward certain health concerns because of cultural factors.

  • Specific concerns include:
  • High incidence of teenage pregnancy
  • Low incidence of breast feeding
  • Where breast feeding is practiced, a tendency to do so for a short period and to introduce solid foods earlier than recommended
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide49

Specific concerns include:

  • Very low intake of vitamin A.
  • Alcohol abuse, especially by young Mexican males (abetted by cultural taboos against female disclosure of alcohol use).
  • Drug use at levels higher than among non-Hispanic Whites.
  • A high prevalence of undetected non-insulin- dependent diabetes
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide50

Specific concerns include:

  • A high incidence of tuberculosis (recommend aggressive screening
  • A high risk for mental health problems such as depression, anxiety, and substance abuse.
  • Dietary concerns due to:
    • High consumption of fats (often lard, especially for lower income people) and fried foods
    • A traditional diet high in carbohydrates from beans and rice or corn tortillas
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide51

Specific concerns include:

  • Dietary concerns due to:
    • Low intake of green or leafy vegetables and/or milk and eggs, especially in conjunction with increased consumption of meat and fast foods as acculturation occurs.
  • Little tradition for “recreational” physical exercise outside the context of field or other physical labor.
  • Excessive reliance on Azarcon which is about 90 percent lead, as a home remedy for gastrointestinal/intestinal complaints.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide52

Specific concerns include:

  • Sharing with family and friends, of hypodermic needles and syringes, which in Mexico are often used to administer vitamins, medications, and contraceptives.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide53

Folk Beliefs of Some Hispanics About Health and Illness That Can Affect Care and Treatment

  • Good health is a matter of luck that can easily change. Sick persons may be the innocent victims of “fate,” with little responsibility for taking action to regain health.
  • Illness may be the result of negative forces in the environment or a punishment for transgressions.
  • Balance and harmony are important to health and well-being. Illness may be the result of an imbalance.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide54

Folk Beliefs of Some Hispanics About Health and Illness That Can Affect Care and Treatment

  • The natural and supernatural worlds are not clearly distinguishable, and body and soul are inseparable. Telling a patient that an illness is all in the mind is meaningless because there is little or no distinction between somatic and psychosomatic illness.
  • Cure requires family participation and support. The family’s role is to indulge the patient, provide unconditional love and support, and participate in health care decision making.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide55

Folk Beliefs of Some Hispanics About Health and Illness That Can Affect Care and Treatment

  • While education and training may be somewhat important, what truly matters is the caregiver’s “gift” or “calling” for curing illness.
  • Moaning, far from being a sign of low tolerance to pain, is a way to reduce pain and to share it with interested others.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide56

Folk Beliefs of Some Hispanics About Health and Illness That Can Affect Care and Treatment

  • Diseases may be divided into Anglo and traditional diseases and may be either natural or unnatural.
  • Many people mix and match “modern” medicine and traditional care, consulting modern health providers for Anglo and natural diseases, and folk healers for traditional and unnatural diseases.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page
slide58

Culture-Sensitive Healthcare: American Indian

  • The term “American Indian” refers to members of Indian Tribal nations who live in the United States.
  • “Native American,” a term that has become unpopular among American Indian groups, refers to American Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts as one racial ethnic group.
  • Fact: The Native American group as a whole is expected to reach 4.3 million by 2050.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide59

Culture-Sensitive Healthcare: American Indian

  • The majority live in Oklahoma, California, Arizona and New Mexico.
  • Poverty is higher than in the rest of the population and continues to increase.
  • In 1979, 27% of the American Indian population lived below the poverty line; by 1989 this figure had grown to 31%, by 1999 this figure had grown again to 33%.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide60

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Make the Patient Welcome.First meetings are important.
    • Extend a warm greeting and smile.
    • Shake hands, introduce yourself, and allow the patient to do the same (thereby showing respect to his or her ancestors)
    • Thank the patient for having chosen your health facility.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide61

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • A western style handshake is appropriate and appreciated, don’t be surprised if it is returned by an unusually weak or strong one.
  • The traditional Navajo greeting is not to shake hands, but to extend the hand and gently touch the other person’s hand.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide62

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Use Eye Contact Judiciously.
  • Prolonged eye contact is considered a sign of disrespect and should be avoided.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide63

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Take Your Time.
  • It is important to spend time with the patient and to avoid appearing hurried or nervous.
  • Patients often travel great distances at great financial hardship to see a physician; if the physician spends only five or ten minutes with them, the message is clear and negative.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide64

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Speak Plainly.
  • Avoid medical or other terms that may not be understood, but at the same time, don’t talk down to the patient or appear to treat him or her as a child.
  • A soft concerned voice will do much to make the patient feel at ease.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide65

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Respect Silence.
  • Be concise and give the patient time to reflect on what you are saying.
  • Don’t try to fill up the time.
  • American Indians are taught the value of silence and may also need time to mentally translate what they hear into their own language.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide66

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Understand Tribal Diagnosis.
  • The patient may have come to you following diagnosis by a tribal diagnostician.
  • Due to this, the patient may be unfamiliar with the technique of identifying the specific location of pain.
  • Instead of asking the patient, “Where is the pain?”, ask the patient to point to the most intense area of pain.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide67

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Accommodate Tribal Healing.
  • Patients may wish to perform certain tribal healing ceremonies, even in the hospital.
  • Try to accommodate these healings as a way to improve both the patient’s and the family’s confidence in the care.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide68

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Show Special Respect to the Elderly.
  • Great respect is given to the elderly, in spite of taboos connected with death.
  • Caregivers gain approval by treating the elderly with kindness and respect and not appearing to criticize or scold them.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide69

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Think Carefully About Family Care.
  • Poverty, distance from the medical facility, and taboos against dying in the home may make it impractical to release to the family a patient needing long-term or terminal care.
  • Discuss options with the family and try to ascertain attitudes about home care before releasing a person into the family care.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide70

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Involve the Extended Family.
  • Extended family plays an important role in healthcare decision making.
  • Often many family members will appear with a patient who is to be admitted for a hospital stay.
  • Include family members when decisions regarding treatment options are needed.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide71

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Involve the Extended Family.
  • Very often, a patient will postpone surgery because the consent of the family leader, often the eldest female must be obtained first.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide72

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Accept a Different Sense of Time.
  • Most American Indians are present-oriented and take a casual approach to clocks and time, which is viewed as a continuum with no beginning and no end.
  • Poses difficulties with regulation of medication.
  • Watch telling the patient to take medications with meals, as the patient may have three meals today, two meals tomorrow and four the meals the day after that.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide73

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Accept a Different Sense of Time.
  • Many Indians are task-conscious rather than time- conscious, paying more attention to finishing task than to a clock or to an appointment schedule.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide74

Keys to a Good Professional Relationship with American Indian Patients

  • Give and Expect Generosity.
  • Indian culture discourages competitive behavior and encourages giving, sharing, and cooperation.
  • Generosity and doing things for others are regarded highly.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide75

Potential Culture-Related Health Concerns Among American Indians

  • Average life expectancy of 71.1 years –lower than all other races in the United States.
  • Many health problems and the high incidence of accidents and suicides.
  • The Infant death rate is high, a fact attributed to a high incidence of diarrhea and a harsh physical environment.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide76

Potential Culture-Related Health Concerns Among American Indians

  • Women may choose not to seek prenatal care, because pregnancy and birth are considered normal processes and health facilities are associated with illness and disease.
  • Pregnant Navajo women are forbidden to attend traditional healing ceremonies to avoid contact with illness or disease.
  • Hold your maternal and child care clinics in a location separate from other clinical services.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide77

Potential Culture-Related Health Concerns Among American Indians

  • A high incidence of non-insulin-dependent (Type II) diabetes – increased dramatically in New Mexico.
  • American Indians are genetically predisposed to the disease – triggered by a radical change in eating habits and increase in obesity among this population.
  • Myocardial infarction incidence is higher among Navajo men and a gradual increase among Navajo women.
  • Alcoholism among this population is very high.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide78

Potential Culture-Related Health Concerns Among American Indians

  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is also fairly high among this population.
  • Navajo children have low length-for-age and high weight-for-length measures because of suboptimal nutrition.
  • Of the 10 leading causes of death among American Indians, 5 are related to diet.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide79

Religious and Spiritual Beliefs That Can Affect Care and Treatment

  • Tribes share a number of fundamental health, illness, and illness prevention beliefs.
  • Life comes from the Great Spirit (or Supreme Creator) and all healing begins with him.
  • Man is a threefold being made up of body, mind and spirit.
  • Health or wellness is due to a preservation of harmony among the body, heart, mind and soul.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide80

Religious and Spiritual Beliefs That Can Affect Care and Treatment

  • Tribes share a number of fundamental health, illness, and illness prevention beliefs.
  • Plants and animals, as well as humans, are part of the spirit world that exists alongside, and is intermingled with, the physical world.
  • Death is not an enemy but a natural phenomenon of life
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide81

Navajo Application of These Beliefs

  • Navajo society is matriarchal - Women hold a higher position than men
  • Focus of Navajo traditional religion is on maintaining a harmonious relationship with all living things.
  • Illness is thought to result from improper thought and behavior affecting oneself as well as the external, natural world of plants, animals, and the environment.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide82

Navajo Application of These Beliefs

  • Illness also is attributed to an improper use of ceremonies.
  • As a rule, Navajo may not seek medical care for a number of discomforts and acute illnesses for which a non-Navajo would seek relief.
  • Illness, like death, is simply viewed and accepted as a natural part of life.
  • Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002
slide83

Marketing and Advertising to Hispanic and Native American Populations

Be culturally sensitive and aware

Spanish language spots (radio or television should be produced specifically for the market and not a lift of the English spot)

Native Americans can be spoken to in their own language on radio (much tougher – there are many different dialects within the state)

Source: Virginia Tech’s Office of Multicultural Affairs Home Page – Updated 2002

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