User interface design
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hapter 90 - User Interface Design - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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User Interface Design The Golden Rules Place the user in control Reduce the user’s memory load Make the interface consistence Place the User in Control Define interaction modes in a way that does not force a user into unnecessary or undesired actions Provide flexible interaction

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The Golden Rules

  • Place the user in control

  • Reduce the user’s memory load

  • Make the interface consistence


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Place the User in Control

  • Define interaction modes in a way that does not force a user into unnecessary or undesired actions

  • Provide flexible interaction

  • Allow user interaction to be interruptible and undoable

  • Streamline interaction as skill levels advance and allow the interaction to be customized

  • Hide technical internals from the causal user

  • Design for direct interaction with objects that appear on the screen


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Reduce the User’s memory load

  • Reduce demand on short term memory

  • Establish meaningful defaults

  • Define shortcuts that are intuitive

  • The visual layout of the interface should be based on a real world metaphor

  • Disclose information in a progressive fashion


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Make the Interface Consistent

  • Things that look difference should act different. Things that look the same should act the same

  • Allow the user to put the current task into a meaningful context

  • Maintain consistency across a family of applications

  • If past interactive models have created user expectations, do not make changes unless there is a compelling reason to do so


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Usability

  • In an insightful paper on usability, Larry Constantine asks a question that has significant bearing on the Subject. “What do users want, anyway?”

  • He answers this way: “What users really want are good tools. All software systems, from OS and languages to data entry and decision support applications, are just tools.

  • End users want from the tools we engineer for them much the same as we expect from the tools we use. They want systems that are easy to learn and that help them do their work.

  • They want sw that doesn’t slow them down, that doesn’t trick or confuse them, that doesn’t not make it easer to make mistakes or harder to finish the job.


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  • A formal definition of usability is somewhat illusive. Donohue and his colleagues define it in the following manner: “Usability is a measure of how well a computer system . . . Facilitates learning; help learners remember what they have learned, reduce the likelihood of errors; enable them to be efficient, and makes them satisfied with the system.


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Is the system usable without continual help or instruction? within a system you are building is to conduct usability assessment or testing. Watch users interact with the system and answer the following questions

Do the rules of interaction help a knowledgeable user to work efficiently?

Do interaction mechanisms become more flexible as users become more knowledgeable?

Has the system been tuned to the physical and social environment in which it will be used.

Is the user aware of the state of the system? Does the user know where she is at all times?

Is the interface structured in a logical and consistent manner?

Are the interaction mechanisms, icons and procedures consistent across the interface?


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  • If each of these questions is answered yes, it is likely that usability has been achieved.

  • Among the many measurable benefits derived from a usable system are increased sales and customer satisfaction, competitive advantage, better reviews in the media, better word of mouth, reduced support costs, improved end user productivity, reduced training costs, reduced documentation cost, reduced likelihood of litigation from unhappy customers.


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User Interface Deign that usability has been achieved.


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