aging in place
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Aging in Place:

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 28

Aging in Place: - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 268 Views
  • Uploaded on

Aging in Place:. Exploring ‘place’ to design better products and services. Alice Ro Lillian Shieh 24 October 2006. NEST’s approach to understanding an issue. Emerging technologies, materials, & markets Home and other sectors. Social & cultural context

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Aging in Place:' - Mia_John


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
aging in place

Aging in Place:

Exploring ‘place’

to design better products and services

Alice Ro

Lillian Shieh

24 October 2006

slide2

NEST’s approach to understanding an issue

Emerging technologies, materials, & markets

Home and other sectors

Social & cultural context

Definitions of home, how it’s changing

Context of the home

Physical spaces and artifacts

People

People’s behaviors, emotions, motivations, perceptions, and values in and around the home

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

our work with baby boomers and aging
Our work with baby boomers and aging

NEST is currently doing long-term research about baby boomer healthcare trends and needs

Why boomers?

  • they have a different view of aging
  • more information is available to them, particularly through the internet
  • they are more “proactive” towards healthcare
  • escalating costs have shifted more healthcare tasks to the patient

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

our work with baby boomers and aging4
Our work with baby boomers and aging

Younger female baby boomers are an area of particular interest:

  • The number of aging people who are single is increasing dramatically, and of those, the majority are women
  • Women are often the health managers for their families
  • This “sandwich” generation cares for kids at home AND aged parents

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

what does aging in place mean today
What does “aging in place” mean today?

Remaining in one’s home as one ages?

This presentation explores the experience of aging through the lens of “place.”

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

case study sarah moves house
Case study: Sarah moves house

Moving house highlights the process of transforming “space” into “place”

We worked with Sarah, one of the women in our study, to learn about her experience of moving and place.

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

meet sarah
Meet Sarah
  • 54 year-old baby boomer
  • Vital career as a scientist
  • Started several successful companies
  • Avid reader
  • Has a lot of friends
  • Active in community
  • Recently lost her father
  • Health concerns are memory loss, overall fitness, and back pain

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

case study sarah moves house8
Case study: Sarah moves house

Separating from husband of 30 years

Moving from Brooklyn brownstone where she has lived for 23 years

Youngest of her 3 sons will live with her part-time

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

where to live
Where to live?

The family farm in Nebraska?

  • Sarah loves the farm, but it’s far for friends to visit

A full-service apartment building in Manhattan?

  • Life would be easier, but could be disruptive to her youngest son, who is in his last year of high school

Final decision:

  • Sarah chose a home in the same neighborhood, with a one-year lease

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

criteria for a home
Criteria for a home
  • Spacious
  • Attractive to her sons
  • Able to accommodate house guests
  • Space for office
  • Places for exercise machines (treadmill and rowing machine)
  • Open plan, “so people don’t feel cut off from each other”

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

arranging a home
Arranging a home
  • Resulting features:
    • The dining room is turned into a family room
    • Part of the living room is turned into a dining area
    • Multiple sleeping areas for house guests
    • Exercise machine in family room with a sightline to the TV

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

choosing what to bring from her old place
Choosing what to bring from her old place . . .

Sarah wanted to…

  • Make a fresh start
  • Bring things that she loved
  • Keep items that embody family history
  • Reduce overall possessions so her sons wouldn’t be overwhelmed after her death

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

and what to leave behind
. . . and what to leave behind

Sarah didn’t want to. . .

  • “Destroy that entity” (her old house) by taking key objects or too much stuff
  • Sarah couldn’t finish sorting her things in time for the move, so she brought boxes of unsorted stuff to her new house with the intent of continuing to sort it

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

choosing what to acquire
Choosing what to acquire

Furniture and design offer a contrast with Sarah’s previous Victorian-style home

  • Paring her belongings frees Sarah from burdens that her old stuff represented
  • A minimalist whiteboard for posting photos of family and friends
  • Comfortable lounge chairs for reading
  • Things that would make her sons want to spend time at her place: e.g., flat screen TVs
  • Furnishings to help her stay organized

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

creating place what we learned
Creating “place:” what we learned

Sarah successfully created a sense of “place” by. . .

  • Carving out nooks to create space for intimate conversations while preserving a feeling of openness
  • Designing spaces for different types of entertaining to encourage friends and family to visit
  • Bringing key artifacts from her old home, especially those reflecting Sarah’s family history and her interest in science
  • Designating a poetry corner that enables her to enjoy a frivolous activity and focus on herself
  • Acknowledging her changing stage in life in the look of the new home

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

creating place physical space
Creating “place:” physical space

self

residence

artifacts

neighborhood

municipality

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

creating place social space
Creating “place:” social space

self

nuclear family

extended family

friends

work

community services

community acquaintances

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

creating place home
Creating “place:” home

self

artifacts

neighborhood

municipality

Home is at the intersection of one’s physical place and social place

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

why is this important
Why is this important?

Although this deconstruction of Sarah’s experience is deceptively simple, the end result is a set of principles for designing new products - for Sarah and many others with similar experiences and needs

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

key design principles
Key design principles
  • Choosing and creating spaces to enhance social connection
  • Push v. pull: surfacing significant artifacts
    • For personalizing space and representing the self
    • For maximizing ease
  • Culling treasures to imbue possessions with value for the next generation
  • Meeting change by looking forward

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

creating place through social connection
Creating “place” through social connection

Space design facilitates connection by offering Sarah different ways to engage with friends and family:

  • Small nooks and hideaways enable cozy escape or intimate gatherings
  • Re-purposing rooms enhances the feeling of connectedness throughout house
  • Easily configurable furniture yields medium and large open spaces that enable entertaining
  • Desks strategically placed with view of televisions encourage sons to hang out or do homework

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

creating place through social connection22
Creating “place” through social connection

Even seemingly minor relationships can be important to one’s sense of community, but social networks aren’t always portable, despite recent advances in electronic communications

Homes of older people should minimize social disruption as much as possible.

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

push v pull surfacing significant artifacts
Push v. pull: surfacing significant artifacts

Furnishings and services can eliminate the problem of “out of sight, out of mind.” Belongings and information that are more visible decrease hassles and things to remember...

Existing products and services:

  • Unified message dashboards don’t require people to remember to check messages on multiple devices
  • Calendars that actively remind you
  • Caller ID with photos
  • Systems like elfa and California Closets
  • Delivery: Fresh Direct, laundry, etc.
  • Catalog and internet interfaces designed for easy readability and navigability

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

culling treasures
Culling treasures

Aging people often want to maintain emotional connections with a lifetime of possessions, yet they also want to be free of the responsibilities that come with possessions. Downsizing after kids go to college is a common phenomenon.

Existing products and services:

  • Organization specialists
  • Closet and storage systems that display and help celebrate one’s history and belongings
  • Physical scrapbooks, journals, frames, and displays
  • Super-easy digital albums

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

meeting change by looking forward
Meeting change by looking forward

Products and services aimed at a general market don’t stigmatize older users. In particular, people more readily adopt products that connote luxury and status, and not decline

Existing products and services:

  • Cruise ship living with all ages
  • Full-service buildings with doormen who can carry packages, supers who can fix things, etc.
  • Spa bathrooms with temperature memory, etc.
  • Cars with night mirrors, cameras on back or cars, auto parallel parking

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

balancing change with continuity
Balancing change with continuity

Sarah’s choices and decisions were marked by looking forward and embracing change…and desiring continuity and a sense of history

Successful designs for baby boomers depend on a sensitive balance between conflicting desires for change and continuity

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

questions
Questions?

Exploring “place” to design better products and services

ad