Jenni Perkins

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Jenni Perkins. Overview. Overview of key components (do you know your areas of focus/priorities and pathways?)What about core principles?Approach to implementation (informing, engaging, implementing, charting progress). What is Count Me In: Disability Future Directions? . A long term plan (15-20 years) for disability in Western AustraliaA guide for all Western Australians when responding to people with disabilities

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Jenni Perkins

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2. Jenni Perkins

3. Overview Overview of key components (do you know your areas of focus/priorities and pathways?) What about core principles? Approach to implementation (informing, engaging, implementing, charting progress)

4. What is Count Me In: Disability Future Directions? A long term plan (15-20 years) for disability in Western Australia A guide for all Western Australians when responding to people with disabilities – politicians, disability organisations, mainstream agencies, businesses and communities DFD was a major recommendation from the Disability Sector Health Check report in 2007DFD was a major recommendation from the Disability Sector Health Check report in 2007

5. How was Disability Future Directions developed? Extensive consultation with over 300 stakeholders Preparation of 10 monograph papers on future economic, environmental and social trends Several planning forums to develop a framework and strategies for the future Guided by a reference group Note that a summary of the three stages used to develop Disability Future Directions and a copy of each monograph is included under Count Me In: Disability Future Directions on the Commission’s website - www.disability.wa.gov.au A reference group was chaired by the Commission’s Director General and included people with disabilities, family members, and representatives from local government, university, research, policy, non government organisations and the Disability Services Commission. Planning forums and consultations included many stakeholders including people with a range of disabilities, families, carers people from Aboriginal and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse backgrounds representatives from disability organisations, local, state and Commonwealth government agencies, community groups and academic institutions Note that a summary of the three stages used to develop Disability Future Directions and a copy of each monograph is included under Count Me In: Disability Future Directions on the Commission’s website - www.disability.wa.gov.au A reference group was chaired by the Commission’s Director General and included people with disabilities, family members, and representatives from local government, university, research, policy, non government organisations and the Disability Services Commission. Planning forums and consultations included many stakeholders including people with a range of disabilities, families, carers people from Aboriginal and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse backgrounds representatives from disability organisations, local, state and Commonwealth government agencies, community groups and academic institutions

6. 2009 - one in five people have a disability 2025 – one in four people will have a disability mainly due to population ageing 2025 - one in three people will be affected by disability either as a person with disability, a family member or carer Approximately 5% of people with a disability have a significant disability where they are limited in daily activities of communication, mobility and self-care. These people are eligible for funded or provided services from the Disability Services Commission2009 - one in five people have a disability 2025 – one in four people will have a disability mainly due to population ageing 2025 - one in three people will be affected by disability either as a person with disability, a family member or carer Approximately 5% of people with a disability have a significant disability where they are limited in daily activities of communication, mobility and self-care. These people are eligible for funded or provided services from the Disability Services Commission

7. Vision All people live in welcoming communities that facilitate citizenship, friendship, mutual support and a fair go for everyone

8. Three areas of focus = personalised supports and services; participation and contribution in all aspects of life; economic and community foundationsThree areas of focus = personalised supports and services; participation and contribution in all aspects of life; economic and community foundations

9. The three areas of focus are supported by 13 priorities and 80 pathways or strategies. Refer to page 7, Disability Future Directions document. The green ‘Participation’ square has five priority areas. The red ‘Economic and Community Foundations’ square has three priority areas. The orange square, ‘Personalised supports and services’, has five priority areas and is the main responsibility of services funded and provided by the Commission and of unfunded disability organisations, for example the Downs Syndrome Association. ‘Participation and Contribution in all aspects of life’ and ‘Economic and Community Foundations’ are the province of mainstream government and community supports and services. All people with disabilities access these services together with the general population. The other two-thirds are primarily the business of mainstream government agencies, local government, businesses and communities. These supports and services have progressively become more welcoming and accessible to people with disabilities. The Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) framework has been a primary mechanism to achieve this. A number of disability focussed health and allied health services once run by the Commission have been integrated into mainstream. Many disability services work in conjunction with mainstream and community services.The three areas of focus are supported by 13 priorities and 80 pathways or strategies. Refer to page 7, Disability Future Directions document. The green ‘Participation’ square has five priority areas. The red ‘Economic and Community Foundations’ square has three priority areas. The orange square, ‘Personalised supports and services’, has five priority areas and is the main responsibility of services funded and provided by the Commission and of unfunded disability organisations, for example the Downs Syndrome Association. ‘Participation and Contribution in all aspects of life’ and ‘Economic and Community Foundations’ are the province of mainstream government and community supports and services. All people with disabilities access these services together with the general population. The other two-thirds are primarily the business of mainstream government agencies, local government, businesses and communities. These supports and services have progressively become more welcoming and accessible to people with disabilities. The Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) framework has been a primary mechanism to achieve this. A number of disability focussed health and allied health services once run by the Commission have been integrated into mainstream. Many disability services work in conjunction with mainstream and community services.

10. Core principles Nothing about us without us Commitment to human rights/vision Ongoing conversations with all – intentional listening, innovative planning, stakeholders good will Reflective process – good measures of progress, detecting emerging needs

11. Implementation challenge Progressing from a set of aspirations to a series of concrete actions Keeping it off the shelf

12. Implementation approach Informing people Launch/dissemination; DG/ sector forum; Ambassadors; parliamentarian packs; new media; ABC radio Engaging people Nothing about us without us; ongoing conversations; reflective process; responding Implement pathways Runs on the board; strategic plan; short,medium, long term; existing, new and emerging pathways Charting progress Tracking and reporting progress Informing – launch by Premier; board chairs/sector forum; engagement with DG’s; parliamentarian packs; utilising new media; cadetship with ABC radio Engaging people – ongoing conversations; reflective process; engaging and responding Implement pathways – balance between opportunistic/strategic = ie where are the doors already open/partly open – how do we open the doors that are closed? Charting progress Informing – launch by Premier; board chairs/sector forum; engagement with DG’s; parliamentarian packs; utilising new media; cadetship with ABC radio Engaging people – ongoing conversations; reflective process; engaging and responding Implement pathways – balance between opportunistic/strategic = ie where are the doors already open/partly open – how do we open the doors that are closed? Charting progress

13. Advisory Group Established 15 member advisory group to advise over next 12 months on Communication/engagement strategies Broad implementation priorities Approach to charting progress DFD Implementation Advisory Group (joint chair) Samantha Jenkinson - Ministerial Advisory Council on Disability and adult with acquired disability (joint chair) Ron Chalmers - Director General Rebecca Brown - Dept Premier and Cabinet Robert Campbell - Director, Dept of Planning Anne Banks-McAllister- CEO Local Govt (Peppermint Grove) Trish Harris- Emeritus Prof Social Science, Murdoch University Joan McKenna-Kerr - Chair National Disability Services and CEO Austism Association of WA Paula Dyke - Director, Wize Therapy Leighton Jay – Parent, Curtin School of Business and CEO Perth Home Care Services Ullia Gangandi – Parent, Medical practitioner and CaLD representative Imran Ariff - Young man with CP and from CaLD background. Rhonda Murphy - Member of WA Aboriginal Advisory Council, Aboriginal, part-time Fitzroy Crossing resident Bruce Langoulant - Chairman, Commission Board, parent. Jenni Perkins - Director Policy and Strategy Kerry Stopher - Manager Disability Future Directions, Executive Support DFD Implementation Advisory Group (joint chair) Samantha Jenkinson - Ministerial Advisory Council on Disability and adult with acquired disability (joint chair) Ron Chalmers - Director General Rebecca Brown - Dept Premier and Cabinet Robert Campbell - Director, Dept of Planning Anne Banks-McAllister- CEO Local Govt (Peppermint Grove) Trish Harris- Emeritus Prof Social Science, Murdoch University Joan McKenna-Kerr - Chair National Disability Services and CEO Austism Association of WA Paula Dyke - Director, Wize Therapy Leighton Jay – Parent, Curtin School of Business and CEO Perth Home Care Services Ullia Gangandi – Parent, Medical practitioner and CaLD representative Imran Ariff - Young man with CP and from CaLD background. Rhonda Murphy - Member of WA Aboriginal Advisory Council, Aboriginal, part-time Fitzroy Crossing resident Bruce Langoulant - Chairman, Commission Board, parent. Jenni Perkins - Director Policy and Strategy Kerry Stopher - Manager Disability Future Directions, Executive Support

14. Ron Chalmers

15. State Government Commitment Premier launched document on International Day of People with Disabilities (3 December 2009) Premier and Minister addressed a forum of Directors General in February 2010. Parliamentarians to receive Disability Future Directions info packs tailored to their electorate. Minister is making a parliamentary address in March 2010

16. Links to other initiatives Recommendations from the State Government’s Economic Audit Committee report United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (covered in next section) National Disability Strategy

17. Economic Audit Committee Focus on citizens – transferring greater control and decision making to the people who access services Strengthening the role of the community sector Changing the relationship between government agencies and community sector organisations Greater across government collaboration

18. National Disability Strategy States, Territories and Commonwealth are developing a coordinated approach to social, economic and community inclusion – to be completed in mid 2010 Informed by national consultations – reported in the ‘Shut Out’ report Six key areas of focus which align well with Disability Future Directions Western Australia provides strong input based on Disability Future Directions

19. Questions Identify opportunities for the disability sector that will help progress Disability Future Directions in each of the three areas of focus. In what ways can disability sector organisations strengthen the involvement of people with disabilities, families and carers in all levels of decision-making? How will this important whole of community agenda influence the way you do business in your organisation? How can the Commission be of most help?

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