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Joint Canada/U.S. Health Survey. Catherine Simile, National Center for Health Statistics Patrice Mathieu, Statistics Canada Ed Rama, Statistics Canada NCHS 2002 Data Users Conference July 15-17, 2002 Washington, DC. Sample Parameters.

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Joint canada u s health survey l.jpg
Joint Canada/U.S. Health Survey

Catherine Simile, National Center for Health Statistics Patrice Mathieu, Statistics Canada

Ed Rama, Statistics Canada

NCHS 2002 Data Users Conference

July 15-17, 2002

Washington, DC


Sample parameters l.jpg
Sample Parameters

  • Target Population: Household residents aged 18 and older in Canada and in United States

  • Produce reliable estimates at the national level for 6 domains :

    • 3 age groups (18-44, 45-64, 65 and older)

    • by gender (F, M)


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Sample Design

  • Sample size:

    • about 5,000 respondents in the U.S.

    • about 3,500 respondents in Canada

  • Random digit dialing (RDD) method used:

    • Telephone numbers are randomly selected

    • 1 respondent per household (18 and older)

      is then selected


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    Sample Design

    • Why use the RDD method?

      • The most similar method existing in both countries

      • Simple method

      • Less expensive

    • Limitations with RDD:

      • Some households don’t have telephone

        • 4% - 5% in the U.S. , less than 2% in Canada

  • The age and sex of the household members are unknown beforehand


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    Sample Design

    • Selection process:

      • List all the household members

      • When 65 and older are presentrandomly select the respondent among the 65 and older only

      • When no 65 and older randomly select the respondent among all the members


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    Sample Design

    • Why increasing the probabilities of selection for the 65 and older ?

      The group “65 and older” is less common in the population (in about 13% of the households)

      Not enough “65 and older” in the sample


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    Sample Design

    • Sample Composition - Canada (similar in the U.S.)


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    Data Collection

    • Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI)

    • All interviews conducted from Statistics Canada regional offices (Toronto, Vancouver, Edmonton and Montreal)

    • Interviews in 3 languages (Eng., Spanish, French)

    • 20 minutes interviews

    • Collection period: November 2002 to March 2003

    • Targeted response rate: 75%

    • No proxy interviews


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    Data Release

    • Public Use File to be released in the fall of 2003.

      (No Master file, for confidentiality reasons)

    • A users manual and initial publication outlining major findings of the survey will be released

    • Information about the survey and the data will be made available on the NCHS and STC websites.


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    Weighting & Estimation

    • Estimation relates sample back to population

    • Must use weights in calculation of estimates to correctly draw conclusions about pop’n of interest

    • Sampling weight is related to the probability of selecting a unit in the sample

    • Respondents selected with unequal probabilities therefore have varying weights


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    Weighting & Estimation

    • Same method for both countries, but applied separately for each

    • Basic weight: inverse of the probability of selecting the telephone line

    • Some weight adjustments:

      • households with more than one phone line

      • non-response (household and respondent levels)

      • etc…

  • Post-stratify to 2002 population estimates based on last Census counts


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    Effect of Weighting

    • Comparison of males and females who reported being in excellent or very good health:

      • Weighted difference: 65.3–61.6 = 3.7%

      • Unweighted difference: 62.6–60.8 = 1.8%

        Source: National Population Health Survey, Statistics Canada


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    Sampling Error

    • Measure of precision, reliability of the estimates

      • Variance (standard deviation)

      • Coefficient of variation

        • Standard deviation of estimate x 100% / estimate itself

      • Example:

        • 24% of population are daily smokers, std dev. = 0.003

        • CV=0.003/0.24 x 100%=1.25%


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    Sampling Variability Guidelines

    Type of estimate CV Guidelines

    Acceptable 0.0-16.5 General unrestricted release

    Marginal 16.6-33.3 General unrestricted release but with warning cautioning users of the high sampling variablitity.

    Unacceptable > 33.3 No release.


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    CV Look-up Tables—Example

    • National Population Health Survey ‑ 1996/1997

    • Approximate Sampling Variability Tables for Ontario Health Area:OTTAWA CARLETON ‑ Selected members

    • NUMERATOR OF ESTIMATED PERCENTAGE

    • PERCENTAGE

    • ('000) 0.1% 1.0% 2.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0% 40.0% 50.0% 70.0% 90.0%

    • 1 ******** 48.6 48.4 47.6 46.4 45.0 43.7 42.3 40.9 39.4 37.8 34.5 26.8 15.5

    • 2 ******** 34.4 34.2 33.7 32.8 31.9 30.9 29.9 28.9 27.9 26.8 24.4 18.9 10.9

    • 3 ******** 28.1 27.9 27.5 26.8 26.0 25.2 24.4 23.6 22.7 21.9 19.9 15.5 8.9

    • 4 ******** 24.3 24.2 23.8 23.2 22.5 21.9 21.2 20.4 19.7 18.9 17.3 13.4 7.7

    • 5 ******** 21.7 21.6 21.3 20.7 20.1 19.5 18.9 18.3 17.6 16.9 15.5 12.0 6.9

    • 6 ******** 19.8 19.7 19.4 18.9 18.4 17.8 17.3 16.7 16.1 15.5 14.1 10.9 6.3

    • 7 ******** 18.4 18.3 18.0 17.5 17.0 16.5 16.0 15.5 14.9 14.3 13.1 10.1 5.8

    • 8 **************** 17.1 16.8 16.4 15.9 15.5 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.4 12.2 9.5 5.5

    • 9 **************** 16.1 15.9 15.5 15.0 14.6 14.1 13.6 13.1 12.6 11.5 8.9 5.2

    • 10 **************** 15.3 15.1 14.7 14.2 13.8 13.4 12.9 12.5 12.0 10.9 8.5 4.9

    • ...

    • ...

    • 300 **************************************************************************************** 2.0 1.5 0.9

    • 350 **************************************************************************************** 1.8 1.4 0.8

    • 400 ************************************************************************************************ 1.3 0.8

    • 450 ************************************************************************************************ 1.3 0.7

    • 500 ************************************************************************************************ 1.2 0.7

    • NOTE: FOR CORRECT USAGE OF THESE TABLES PLEASE REFER TO MICRODATA DOCUMENTATION


    Cv look up tables l.jpg
    CV Look-up Tables

    • Appoximate

    • Can only use for categorical variables, and for estimations of totals and proportions

    • Provided with PUF

    • Easy to use

    • The CVs in the table take into account the design effect and the weights adjustments


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