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Voodoo. By: Emily, Mallory, and Elizabeth. Background. Began in Haiti in 1724 Brought to the US in 1804 by the Cuban plantation owner’s slaves Mixed with certain aspects of Catholicism Voodoo comes from African roots meaning spirit Practiced by more than 80 million people today. Beliefs.

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voodoo

Voodoo

By: Emily, Mallory, and Elizabeth

background
Background
  • Began in Haiti in 1724
  • Brought to the US in 1804 by the Cuban plantation owner’s slaves
  • Mixed with certain aspects of Catholicism
  • Voodoo comes from African roots meaning spirit
  • Practiced by more than 80 million people today
beliefs
Beliefs
  • Belief in one god: Bondye
  • The central aspect is healing people from illness with herbs and faith healing (help from the spirits)
  • Belief in 3 types of spirits
    • The Dead
    • The Twins (contradicting forces…good vs. evil)
    • Loa (forces of the universe)
  • Spirits aren’t entirely evil or entirely good.
  • Human Being Consists of two parts
    • Ti-Bon-Age (little good angel)
    • Gro-Bon-Age (Big good angel)
priests and priestesses
Priests and Priestesses
  • Male (houngans) or female (mambos)
  • Purposes include: healing rituals, ceremonies to pacify the spirits, telling fortunes, reading dreams, casting spells and making potions.
the loa
The Loa
  • The spirits that are to be served to
  • In control of people’s fate
  • Appeased with ceremonies and sacrifices
  • Intertwined with Catholic saints
  • Represent aspects of the universe
examples of loa
Examples of Loa

Some of the central Loa

  • Legba. An old man who is the gatekeeper between the two worlds, world of earth and the world of the Invisibles. He is the origin of life.
  • Kalfu is the spirit of the night, the origins of darkness. The moon is his symbol. He can be placated, but is a dangerous Loa.
  • Papa Ghede. Loa of death and resurrection. A total clown. Very erotic and comic. He is the lord of eroticism.
  • Dumballah. The father figure. He is the good snake. The source of peace and tranquillity. He is much loved and sought after. His wife Aida-wedo attends him.
  • Agwe. The sovereign of the seas. Especially honored, as one might well expect, by people who live near the sea.
  • Ogoun. The warrior. Today, too, the force of politics. Violent.
  • Erzulie. The earth mother. Spirit of the goddess of love. The muse of beauty. She can read the future in dreams. A much loved Loa.
ceremonies
Ceremonies
  • Priests and Priestesses perform these Voodoo ceremonies
  • Drums and dancing call the spirits
  • Offerings and animal sacrificings are for the spirit
  • A person has to be possessed by a Loa

(Touching the person while being possessed is said to cause death)

ceremonies cont
Ceremonies cont.
  • Parish is the Priests geographical location
  • Temple or Hounfort
  • Peristyle is a location for public voodoo rituals
  • An alter contains items that the spirit take value for…candles and food to sacred rocks and bells
works cited
Works Cited
  • All about the Occult. Voodoo Religion Rituals and Beliefs. 23 Nov. 2008. <http://www.allabouttheoccult.org/voodoo-religion.htm>.
  • Krause, Cheri. Voodooism in Haiti. 23 Nov. 2008. <http://www.goshen.edu/bio/Biol410/bsspapers96/KRAUSECheri.html>.
  • The Drumbeat of Hope and Faith: The Role of Vodou (Voodoo) in Haitian Culture. Discovery Channel School. 1997.Discovery Education. 23 Nov. 2008. <http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com/>.
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