Pol 168 chican@ latin@ politics
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POL 168 Chican@/Latin@ Politics. Professor Brad Jones Dept. of Political Science UC-Davis Winter 2008. Latino Participation. What is political participation? The different flavors? Barriers to participation? Costs associated with participation

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POL 168 Chican@/Latin@ Politics

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POL 168Chican@/Latin@ Politics

Professor Brad Jones

Dept. of Political Science

UC-Davis

Winter 2008


Latino Participation

  • What is political participation?

    • The different flavors?

  • Barriers to participation?

    • Costs associated with participation

    • For Latino/a community, language may be an issue.

  • General findings:

    • On most indicators of participation, Latinos tend to exhibit lower rates compared to Anglos

    • Reasons?


Some Data

  • Pew 2004 National Survey of Latinos: Politics and Civic Participation

  • National survey of Latino/a individuals

  • Let’s turn to some simple analysis and see what we learn.


Interest in Politics

  • Interest in politics does a good job of predicting subsequent participation.

  • Contrast Latina vs. Latino

  • Question asks about attention paid to politics.


Attention: Males slightly more attentive than females in survey (p=.07, two-tail).


Attention: US-born more attentive than non US-born in survey (p=.00, two-tail).


Other Results

  • Mexican Origin slightly less attentive compared to non-Mexican origin.

  • Cuban Origin significantly more attentive to politics compared to non-Cubano

  • No significant differences in attentiveness for Central or South American descent.

  • Comparisons to Anglo population?


Party Affiliation

  • Why care about party affiliation?

    • Closed primaries

    • Dominance of two-party system (like it or not)

  • Concerns about “monolithic” vote.

    • Is it fair to characterize Latino/as as a singular group?

  • Let’s consider some data.


Identification: All Respondents


Identification: By Gender


Identification: By Birthplace


Identification by Origin: Mexican

  • Mexican Origin

    • About 14 percent identify REPUBLICAN

    • About 35 percent identify DEMOCRAT

    • About 26 percent identify INDEPENDENT

    • About 12 percent identify as “SOMETHING ELSE”

  • Take-away points?


Identification by Origin: Cuba

  • Cuban Origin

    • About 47 percent identify REPUBLICAN

    • About 19 percent identify DEMOCRAT

    • About 17 percent identify INDEPENDENT

    • About 6 percent identify as “SOMETHING ELSE”

  • Take-away points?


Identification by Origin: Puerto Rico

  • Puerto Rican Origin

    • About 16 percent identify REPUBLICAN

    • About 44 percent identify DEMOCRAT

    • About 17 percent identify INDEPENDENT

    • About 12 percent identify as “SOMETHING ELSE”

  • Take-away Points?


Identification: Central American

  • Central American Origin

    • 14 percent REPUBLICAN

    • 32 percent DEMOCRAT

    • 31 percent INDEPENDENT

    • 6 percent SOMETHING ELSE

    • “Leaners” 47 percent DEM


Identification: South American

  • South American Origin

    • 17 percent REPUBLICAN

    • 36 percent DEMOCRAT

    • 28 percent INDEPENDENT

    • 10 percent SOMETHING ELSE

    • “Leaners” 47 percent DEM


Implications of all of this?

  • Are Latino/as monolithic, in terms of partisanship?

  • What do these sliver of data suggest for the future? (If anything)

  • Other interesting features of these data…

  • “Descriptive Representation”

    • To what extent are Latino/as represented by a Latino/a?

    • Does it matter?


Descriptive Representation

  • “Latinos are more likely to vote if there are Latinos on the ballot.” (Agree/Disagree)


Descriptive Representation

  • “Latino Voters are more likely to vote for a Latino candidate instead of a non-Latino running for the same office if they have the same qualifications.” (Agree/Disagree)


Other Results

  • 56 percent of respondents agree with the statement: “Latino voters will usually pick a Latino candidate even if there is a better qualified non-Latino running…”.

  • 37 percent of respondents agree with the statement: “I am more likely to vote if there are Latinos on the ballot.” (i.e. most disagree)

  • Implications of this?


Side-trip to Immigration

  • You didn’t think I could keep away from it…

  • 65 percent say undocumented migrants “help the economy by providing low-cost labor.”

  • 61 percent of Republican Latinos agree.

  • 56 percent of US-born Latinos agree.

  • 78 percent of Mexican origin agree

  • 56 percent of Cuban origin agree

  • 41 percent of Puerto Rican origin agree

  • 69 percent of Central American origin agree

  • 61 percent of South American origin agree


Immigration

  • 54 percent support guest worker program with provision migrants must return to their home country.

  • 67 percent of Republican Latinos agree.

  • 51 percent of US-born Latinos agree.

  • 57 percent of Mexican origin agree

  • 64 percent of Cuban origin agree

  • 42 percent of Puerto Rican origin agree

  • 43 percent of Central American origin agree

  • 50 percent of South American origin agree


Immigration

  • 87 percent support “path-to-citizenship.”

  • 85 percent of Republican Latinos agree.

  • 80 percent of US-born Latinos agree.

  • 90 percent of Mexican origin agree

  • 91 percent of Cuban origin agree

  • 79 percent of Puerto Rican origin agree

  • 90 percent of Central American origin agree

  • 90 percent of South American origin agree


Immigration

  • 57 say immigrants “have to speak English to say they are part of American society.”

  • 65 percent of Republican Latinos agree.

  • 53 percent of US-born Latinos agree.

  • 54 percent of Mexican origin agree

  • 65 percent of Cuban origin agree

  • 54 percent of Puerto Rican origin agree

  • 54 percent of Central American origin agree

  • 71 percent of South American origin agree


Immigration

  • 82 percent say immigrants “have to believe in the US Constitution to say they are part of American society.”

  • 91 percent of Republican Latinos agree.

  • 81 percent of US-born Latinos agree.

  • 80 percent of Mexican origin agree

  • 91 percent of Cuban origin agree

  • 78 percent of Puerto Rican origin agree

  • 81 percent of Central American origin agree

  • 84 percent of South American origin agree


Immigration

  • 55 percent say immigrants “have to become a US citizen to say they are part of American society.”

  • 64 percent of Republican Latinos agree.

  • 57 percent of US-born Latinos agree.

  • 51 percent of Mexican origin agree

  • 63 percent of Cuban origin agree

  • 63 percent of Puerto Rican origin agree

  • 52 percent of Central American origin agree

  • 47 percent of South American origin agree


Immigration

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Lb3oFzCj_0


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