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GSM-on-the-Net and FMC issues. Lill Kristiansen based partly on paper from Ericsson review 1998 http://www.item.ntnu.no/~lillk/docs/gsm-on-the-net-1998046.pdf and partly on own work at Ericsson 1998-2001,. Background. from the paper:

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gsm on the net and fmc issues

GSM-on-the-Netand FMC issues

Lill Kristiansen

based partly on paper from Ericsson review 1998 http://www.item.ntnu.no/~lillk/docs/gsm-on-the-net-1998046.pdf

and partly on own work at Ericsson 1998-2001,

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

background
Background
  • from the paper:
  • The handling and sharing of information is of vital importance to the business world.
  • To this end, many companies have installed a local area network (LAN) to make in-house networking and communication more efficient.
  • Internet/intranet, e-mail and databases are a few examples of applications and entities accessible from a LAN.

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

why in 1998
Why? in 1998
  • IP-telephone was emerging (mostly on PCs)
    • VoIP but also shared applic. &video
  • Ericsson: strong position in public GSM
    • wanted the GSM-UMTS-track to continue
    • GSM-on-the-net was targeted towards the enterprise market
    • ’intergration/convergence with databases (address books, customer relations etc.)

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

evolution of ip telephony to multimedia players market
Evolution of IP Telephony to MultimediaPlayers, market

Mobility/Wireless Integration

Next Generation

Converged Networks

Integrated Services

Data/Voice Integration

/Multimedia

Basic Voice

Low-cost telephony

/Mobile

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

former technology for enterprises
Former technology for enterprises
  • In DECT, all user services reside in the PBX, while all wireless-related services (for example, roaming and handover) are handled by a mobility server.
  • In the case of GSM, new features are introduced in the macro network in order to support typical office services. (proffnett etc.)
    • For example, home zones make it possible to distinguish between external calls and calls made in the office; virtual private networks (VPN) support private numbering plans.

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

future proof
”Future proof”
  • The PBX market is changing rapidly, however, and sooner or later today’s solutions, which are based on proprietary hardware and a circuit-switched environment, will be replaced by PBXs operating according to the Internet protocol (IP).
  • Clearly, therefore, a sustainable, long-term solution for GSM in the office will have to be based on IP. (“future proof”)

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

user and terminal mobility
user and terminal mobility
  • Terminal mobility
    • A terminal can be moved around geographicallywithout losing contact with the system.
  • User mobility
    • A user can opt to access GSM on the Net indifferent ways.
    • Regardless of whether a phone or a PC is chosen as a means of access, the system will keep track of the user and the terminal’s capabilities.
      • (Registration via PC is not by using the SIM-card)

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

fmc several generations
FMC several generations
  • Steinara pketches a solution to add a SIMcard reader to add fixed phones to integrate with GSM
    • This will make fixed voice an ’access technology’ into GSM
    • GSM will be the core system
    • we can call this ”2G FMC”
  • No so in GSM-on-the-Net! There a new generation of services ”3+G” (3G-All-IP) is the new core ”3+G FMC”
    • ’access antagonistic system’
    • Core system is future proof IP allowing for MMoIP / XoIP (anything over IP),
      • today partly called VVoIP
    • PSTN, GSM, LAN are all access technologies
      • each with some restrictions
      • GSM: good mobility but not VVoIP
      • PC: XoIP and good UI, but only nomadic mobility (unless WLAN with handover support is added as well)
      • Issue: session handover, in particular from IP to the GSM-part
  • If GSM-on-the-Net is deployed publicly: Then it is IMS (and 2G GSM may play a smaller part in the system over time)

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

gsm on the net one user several phones
GSM on the Net: one user, several phones

From Ericsson Review No 04, 1998 http://www.ericsson.se/review/pdf/1998046.pdf

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

service architecture
A user’s service profile is stored in the service node, not in each type of access. (“access antagonistic”)

This means that all specified services are available to users, no matter what type of terminal they use to access the system.

Keeping track of terminal capabilities that may limit this.

” However, the man-machine interface or limitations in bandwidth in the chosen access may reduce or inhibit the use of some services.”

”Service architecture”

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

system topology next generation networks
System topology - Next generation networks
  • Today
    • Separate Networks
    • Separate Users
    • Separate Services
  • Tomorrow
    • Separate Accesses
    • Same Core network
    • Same User on different accesses
    • Same Services

Separate Services

PLMN

Data/IP Networks

PSTN/ISDN

CATV

Separate users

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

system topology next generation networks12
System topology - Next generation networks
  • Today
    • Separate Networks
    • Separate Users
    • Separate Services
  • Tomorrow
    • Separate Accesses
    • Same Core network
    • Same User on different accesses
    • Same Services

Servers

Content

Content

Communication Control

Access Gateways

Access Gateways

Backbone Network

Access

Access

Access

Users

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

virtual home environment input to etsi tiphon

Services

User/subscriber

database

Home GK

Virtual Home Environment (input to ETSI Tiphon)
  • The user may log on from anywhere
  • Visited GK control his own resource
  • The visited GK contact home GK and routes the call (but not necessarily the media) via the home GK

I/f

Registration via visiting GK to home GK

Visited GK

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

benitif box selling arguments
For the operator, GSM on the Net offers:

increased GSM traffic—new subscribers and lower churn

Furthermore, the business user’s behavior pattern, in terms of calling frequency and call duration, will transfer to global use as well;

profit margins—if supplied by the operator, system equipment (servers and phones) will boost profit margins through increased product sales and more service agreements;

new services—the provision of convergence services will generate more revenue.

Examples include service packages, which can be tailored to suit individual organizations and vertical market applications.

For the user [enterprise mainly, end-users partly], GSM on the Net offers:

freedom at work—the same “look and feel” wherever the system is accessed (whether the user is in the office, at a subsidiary, at home, or traveling);

convenience—having GSM integrated into the office gives the convenience of one phone and one number. The same phone is used, regardless of user whereabouts, within or outside of the office;

cost-effectiveness—implementation costs are low because existing PCs and LANs are used. Similarly, operation costs are low thanks to low-tariff, local traffic (through local switching); differentiated user authorization available resources for administration (for example, the IT support team); adaptability—the system is a smoothly fitting part of the existing network environment (and applications) and can easily be expanded and improved with respect to capacity, functional content, and quality;

scalability—flexible service and application design (server applications), easy-to-add base stations and handsets.

Benitif box (selling arguments)

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

more on business
More on business
  • GSM radio frequency is licenced
  • GSM operator stay in the value chain
  • Later:
    • Ratate this business chain with e.g. OBAN

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

deployment
Deployment
  • How to make ”boxes” out of the logical architecture
    • taking scalability and more into account

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

small and medium size company solution
Small and medium-size company solution

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

large company solution
Large-company solution

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

ps postscript
”PS: postscript”
  • Many press releases around 98-2000 about the system (trials around the world).
    • No press release to close down the system (such press releases normally are not produced)
  • Architecture went into IMS
  • A research paper from 2002 (by Ericsson people):
    • Sharareh, A., Matteo, G., and Gianluca, T. 2002. Quantitative analysys for telecom/datacom software architecture. In Proceedings of the 3rd international Workshop on Software and Performance (Rome, Italy, July 24 - 26, 2002). WOSP \'02. ACM Press, New York, NY, 219-226. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/584369.584401

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

pps enterprise solution in ericsson today
PPS (enterprise solution in Ericsson today )
  • Communication solutions
  • Solutions for your communication, includes IP PBX, Converged PBX systems and Branch Office solutions
  • Mobility solutions
  • As markets and businesses become more global, and the popularity of flexible working grows, there is a clear trend for enterprise workforces to become more mobile.We are in a unique position to meet the needs you have as a mobile workforce, whether you are on the road or at the office, working from home or at another company’s premises.
  • Terminals
  • We have all the terminals and telephones you\'ll need to have a complete communication solution.
  • Enterprise services
  • Advice, Managed services and System integration solutions
  • Customer care
  • Find out about the state-of-the art multimedia IP contact center Solidus eCare.
  • Infrastructure and Access
  • Find out what Ericsson can offer in terms of infrastructure and access solutions.
  • (from http://www.ericsson.com/solutions/enterprise/products/by_solution.shtml Oct. 2007)

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

ppps ericssons views on enterprise terminals today
PPPS (Ericssons views on enterprise terminals today)
  • IP telephones
  • The Dialog 4000 IP range are fully-featured IP telephones that harnesses the combined power of your existing data network and your Ericsson PBX. The IP telephones are compatible with MX-ONE Telephony System, BusinessPhone and MDEvolution.
  • IP Softphone for large enterprises
  • Ericsson Communication Client, the IP softphone for large enterprises, you can make and receive calls directly from your PC just as easily as from your office phone.
  • IP Soft phone for small and medium enterprises
  • Ericsson BackStage, the IP Soft phone for small and medium enterprises.
  • Business Cordless telephones
  • All our phones are equipped with business-class functions like a comfortable menu interface, easy-to-read display, quick access volume keys, extensive phonebook, calling line identity and message waiting indication. The Cordless telephones are compatible with MX-ONE Telephony System, BusinessPhone and MDevolution.
  • Digital system telephones
  • To bring out the best in your Ericsson business communication system, you need the Dialog 4000 series. The Digital system telephones are compatible with MX-ONE Telephony System, BusinessPhone and MDEvolution.
  • Fixed Wireless terminals
  • Ericsson Fixed Wireless Terminals are the ideal solution for providing voice, fax and high-speed data connectivity for residential, Small Office/Home Office and small enterprises.
  • Analog telephones
  • Ericsson\'s analog telephone serie Dialog 4000 is specifically built to be compatible with any analog extension of an Ericsson or other PBX.
  • ISDN telephones
  • The Dialog 3310 is a fully featured digital phone for both business and home users.
  • Accessories
  • Find the right accessories to your Ericsson Enterprise telephone.
  • Mobile phones
  • Find mobile telephones at the Sony Ericsson website
  • (from: http://www.ericsson.com/solutions/enterprise/products/dir_telephones.shtml Oct 2007)

GSM-on-the-Net viewed in 1998 and in 2007

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