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Incident Command System (ICS) - Review -. Steve Prziborowski. Incident Command System Definition. An Incident Management System using: a common organizational structure assigned incident resources stated objectives. Elements of an effective Incident Management System.

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Incident command system ics review l.jpg

Incident Command System(ICS)- Review -

Steve Prziborowski


Incident command system definition l.jpg

Incident Command SystemDefinition

  • An Incident Management System using:

    • a common organizational structure

    • assigned incident resources

    • stated objectives


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Elements of an effective Incident Management System

  • Suitable for use regardless of jurisdiction or agency involved

  • The organizational structure must be able to adapt to an incident regardless of how complicated

  • Expandable in a logical manner from initial response to a major emergency so as not to have one plan for "everyday" use and a separate plan for "the big one”

  • Basic common elements in organization, terminology, and procedures


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The Incident Command System (ICS) as a Management Tool

  • Ensures Unity of Command in that each individual participating in the operation only reports to one supervisor.

  • Provides a standard set of terms for communicating designation of resources and facilities. Plain English is used rather than 10-codes.

  • Lines of authority provide for lines of communication. This means that the right people receive the proper messages because all communications follow the chain.

  • Provides for Span of Controlwhich is the number of subordinates one supervisor can manage effectively

    (3-7 with 5 preferred).


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ICS as a Management Tool(cont.)

  • Has all-risk design. Confusion is reduced by the fact that the same methods are used regardless of the type of situation and agencies involved.

  • Provides for safety of personnel. All persons are accounted for and efforts are coordinated in a manner which provides for the safety of all persons.

  • Provides for modular expansion. As either the incident enlarges or additional resources become available, span of control continues to meet the needs.

  • Improved resource utilization. With a clear organizational structure, each resource can concentrate on its assignment and eliminate duplication of effort.


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ICS should be used for all incidents…not just the “big ones”.

  • Why?


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Span of Control range isthree to seven


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OPTIMUM SPAN OF CONTROL IS ONE TO FIVE


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Branch

  • That organizational level having functional or geographic responsibility for major segments of incident operations (such as Air Ops, Service or Support).

  • The Branch level that is organizationally between Sections and Divisions/ Sectors/Groups (>5).


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THERE ARE TWO TYPES OF BRANCHES

BRANCHESMAINTAIN SPAN OF CONTROL

Geographic

Branches


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BRANCHES (continued)

LOGISTICS SECTION CHIEF

SERVICE BRANCH

SUPPORT BRANCH

Ground Support Unit

Communications Unit

Functional

Branches

Facilities Unit

Medical Unit

Supply Unit

Food Unit


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7

A

6

5

C

4

B

3

2

1

DIVISIONSWill always divide an Incident geographically

STRUCTURE

INCIDENT

HAZMAT OR WILDFIRE

INCIDENT


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7

6

5

4

3

2

1

GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS:

OUTER

INNER

PERIMETER

PERIMETER


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GROUPS

  • POOL SPECIALIZED RESOURCE TEAMS

    or

  • ESTABLISH FUNCTIONAL AREAS OF OPERATION


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FUNCTIONAL GROUPS:


E x p a n d a b l e l.jpg

E-x-p-a-n-d-a-b-l-e


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In ICS, common terminology is applied to:

  • Organizational elements:

    • Sections, Units, Divisions, etc.

  • Position Titles:

    • Officers, Chiefs, Leaders, Managers

  • Resources:

    • Engine, Truck, Tanker, Crew, Dozer

  • Facilities:

    • Base, Helispot, Camp, ICP, Helibase


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    ICS Integrated Communications

    COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

    FREQUENCY AND RESOURCE USE PLANNING

    INFORMATION TRANSFER PROCEDURES


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    “Clear Text“

    • The use of plain English in radio communications transmissions.

    • No Ten Codes, or agency specific codes are used when using clear text.


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    TWO WAYS TO ORGANIZE INCIDENT COMMAND

    A

    B

    A

    C

    SINGLE

    COMMAND

    UNIFIED COMMAND


    Managing an incident using unified command l.jpg

    A

    C

    B

    MANAGING AN INCIDENT USING UNIFIED COMMAND

    UNIFIED COMMAND

    A

    B

    C

    OBJECTIVES AND

    STRATEGY INCIDENT

    ACTION PLAN

    OPERATIONS

    SECTION CHIEF

    HAZMAT

    INCIDENT

    DIV. A

    DIV. B

    DIV. C


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    Under Unified Commandthere will always be:

    • A single, coordinated IAP

    • One Ops Section Chief

    • One Incident Command Post

    • A Unified Ordering Point


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    Reasons to Transfer Command

    • More qualified person assumes command.

    • A jurisdiction or agency change in command legally required or makes good management sense

    • Normal turnover of personnel on long or extended incidents.


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    Upon arrival at the Incident a Higher Ranking Officer shall:

    1. ASSUME COMMAND or

    2. MAINTAIN COMMAND or

    3. REASSIGN COMMAND to a third party or

    4. FILL ANOTHER ICS POSITION


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    What have we got

    What do we need

    Basically the who, when, where, what, why

    Incidents current status & prognosis?

    The plan of action?

    Current strategy/tactics

    Any resources at scene, enroute and / or ordered?

    Current ICS structure

    Any related issues or concerns?

    Basically the info from the ICS 201 Form

    TRANSFER OF COMMAND BRIEFING


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    INCIDENT

    COMMANDER

    INFORMATION

    LIAISON

    SAFETY

    COMMAND

    STAFF

    PLANNING

    FINANCE

    OPERATIONS

    LOGISTICS

    THE COMMAND STAFF:

    7-12


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    Incident Commander“IC”


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    Incident CommanderResponsibilities

    • The individual responsible for the management of all incident operations.

      • Establishes a command organization.

      • Assesses situation, determines scope of incident, and prioritizes the problem.

      • Evaluates overall strategy on a continual basis.

      • Directs activities and maintains communications with Command Staff, Plans, Logistics, and Operations.


    Incident commander major responsibilities and duties l.jpg

    INCIDENT COMMANDER MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES

    • Keep agency administrator informed of incident status

    • Approve the use of students, volunteers, and auxiliary personnel

    • Authorize release of information to the news media

    • Order the demobilization of the incident


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    IC - ESTABLISHES THE IMMEDIATE PRIORITIES

    FIRST PRIORITY IS INCIDENT SAFETY

    • People involved in incident

    • Responders

    • Other emergency workers

    • Bystanders


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    IC - ESTABLISHES THE IMMEDIATE PRIORITIES

    SECOND PRIORITY IS INCIDENT STABILIZATION

    • Protect the public

    • Sufficient kinds of resources?

    • Sufficient sized organization?


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    Command Staff

    • They report directly to the Incident Commander

    INFORMATION

    OFFICER

    SAFETY

    OFFICER

    LIAISON

    OFFICER


    Safety officer l.jpg

    Safety Officer


    Safety officer responsibilities l.jpg

    Safety OfficerResponsibilities

    • A Command Staff member responsible for monitoring and assessing safety hazards, unsafe situations, and developing measures for ensuring personnel safety.

      • Identify existing and potential hazards

      • Keep all personnel informed of existing and potential hazards

      • Correct unsafe acts or conditions and exercise emergency authority to prevent unsafe acts when immediate action is needed

      • Investigate accidents within the incident area


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    Liaison Officer

    • Several agencies will be sending personnel

    • IC can no longer provide sufficient time for all representatives

    • Two or more jurisdictions may be involved


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    Agency Representative

    • An individual assigned from an assisting or cooperating agency who has been delegated full authority to make decisions on all matters affecting that agency’s participation.

    • Agency Representatives report to the Liaison Officer.


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    Information Officer

    • Responsible for interface with the media or other appropriate agencies requiring information directly from the scene.

    • Member of the Command Staff.


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    THE GENERAL STAFF:

    INCIDENT

    COMMANDER

    PLANNING

    FINANCE

    OPERATIONS

    LOGISTICS

    GENERAL STAFF POSITIONS

    07-17


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    Operations Chief


    Operations chief responsibilities l.jpg

    Operations ChiefResponsibilities

    • Responsible for all tactical operations at the incident.

      • Supervises emergency operations

      • Establishes communication procedures with IC and subordinates

      • Determines need for immediate and anticipated resources

      • Requests periodic progress reports from Division/Group Supervisors


    Ics resource status conditions l.jpg

    “AVAILABLE”

    (Within 3 Minutes)

    ICS RESOURCE STATUS CONDITIONS

    “OUT OF SERVICE”

    (usually mechanical reasons)

    “ASSIGNED”

    (or “Committed”)


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    PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY MAINTAINED THROUGH THE USE OF:

    CHECK-IN FORM

    RESOURCE STATUS

    KEEPING SYSTEM

    UNITY OF COMMAND


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    DIVISION A

    DIVISION C

    UNIT LOG

    UNIT LOG

    DIVISION B

    UNIT LOG

    UNIT LOG

    PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITYIS ALSO MAINTAINED THROUGH :

    DIVISION / GROUP

    ASSIGNMENT

    LISTS

    UNIT LOGS


    Technical specialists l.jpg

    Technical Specialists

    • Personnel with special skills who are activated only when needed. Technical Specialists may be needed in the areas of fire behavior, water resources, environmental concerns, resource use, or training.

    • Technical Specialists report initially to the Planning Section but may be assigned anywhere within the ICS organizational structure as needed.


    Incident action plan or iap l.jpg

    “ Incident Action Plan “or IAP

    • The strategic goals, tactical objectives, and support requirements for the incident.

    • All incidents require some form of an Action Plan!

    • For simple incidents the Action Plan is not usually in written form.

    • Large or complex incidents will require that the Action Plan be documented in writing.


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    The IAP


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    COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS THAT MAY BE REQUIRED

    • Command Net

    • Tactical Nets

    • Support Net

    • Ground-to-air

    • Air-to-air

    02-17


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    INCIDENT

    COMMAND

    POST

    • Location where primary command functions are performed

    • Only one per incident

    • May be located with other facilities (plans, base)

    • Normally not relocated

    • The communications center is often located with the ICP

    • The incident commander will be at the ICP


    Response guidelines l.jpg

    RESPONSE GUIDELINES:

    • Assemble or update a travel kit

    • Prepare personal items you will need

    • Review your emergency assignment

    • Know to whom you will report and what your responsibility will be

    • Ensure that family members know your destination and how to contact you

    06-03.1


    Information needed prior to departure for incident assignment l.jpg

    INFORMATION NEEDED PRIOR TO DEPARTURE FOR INCIDENT ASSIGNMENT

    • Incident type and name or designation

    • Incident check-in location & time

    • Travel instructions

    • Communications instructions

    • Resource order number & request number

    • Your unit’s radio designation

    06-04


    Incident check in locations l.jpg

    INCIDENT CHECK-IN LOCATIONS

    • Incident Command Post: - Resources Unit

    • Base Or Camp(s)

    • Staging Areas

    • Helibase

    06-06.1


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    DIVISION / GROUP SUPERVISOR OR OPERATIONS SECTION CHIEF OR INCIDENT COMMANDER

    FOR DIRECT TACTICAL ASSIGNMENTS REPORT TO YOUR:

    However, at the end of first operational period, ensure that you have checked in at the

    Appropriate check-in location!

    06-06


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    RESOURCE STATUS KEEPING SYSTEMS

    CREWSOH A/C

    T-Cards

    E 2466

    Incinet & ROSS


    Resource management in i c s l.jpg

    RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN I.C.S.

    STRIKE TEAM

    Combination of same

    Kind and type

    TASK FORCES

    Combination of

    Single resources


    Kinds of resources l.jpg

    KINDSOF RESOURCES:

    Overhead

    Crews

    Equipment

    Aircraft


    Types of engines l.jpg

    TYPESOF ENGINES:

    TYPE1

    TYPE 3

    Pass around the FOG...


    Advantages to resource typing l.jpg

    ADVANTAGES TO RESOURCE TYPING

    • Helps plan for resource needs

    • In ordering resources

    • In monitoring effectiveness of resource use


    Ways of ordering resources l.jpg

    WAYS OF ORDERING RESOURCES

    • AS ASINGLE RESOURCE (1-onion)

    • AS ATASK FORCE (various veggies)

    • AS A STRIKE TEAM (5 lbs of onions)


    Examples of a single resource l.jpg

    EXAMPLES OF A SINGLE RESOURCE


    Example of a mixed resources to form a task force l.jpg

    EXAMPLE OF A MIXED RESOURCESto form aTASK FORCE:


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    REQUIREMENTS TO BE ASTRIKE TEAM:

    • Samekind and type of resources

    • Must have a leader

    • Communications between resources and leader

    • Must have transportation (as required)

    • Operates within span of control limits (3-7)


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    SUMMARY CONSIDERATIONS

    • Correct / report harassment or discrimination

    • Do not use alcohol or drugs

    • Represent agency & self professionally

    06-12


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    Questions?


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    Contact Information

    • Steve Prziborowski

    • 408-205-9006 - cellular

    • [email protected]

    • www.code3firetraining.com website


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