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Chapter 11 The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training. After studying this chapter, you will be able to:. 1. Discuss the staffing function and describe the roles of the human resources staff and supervisors.

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Chapter 11 The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training


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After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

1.Discuss the staffing function and describe the roles of the human resources staff and supervisors.

2. Explain how the supervisor prepares to fill job openings and why job descriptions and job specifications are critical to this task.

3. Discuss the selection process and the use of directive and nondirective interviewing in the process.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

4. Describe how the supervisor should prepare for and conduct an effective selection interview.

5. Explain the hiring decision and the importance of documentation.

6. Identify the characteristics of an effective orientation program.

7. Explain approaches to training and the supervisor’s role in employee development.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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1

THE STAFFING FUNCTION

Management of human resources is the supervisor’s most important activity, and it depends upon staffing.

Managers and human resource departments must balance their authority.

Supervisors who follow human resources’ advice are still accountable for the outcomes of their decisions.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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THE STAFFING FUNCTION

Since supervisors depend on employees for results, they must make certain there are enough well-trained employees available to fill all positions.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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THE STAFFING FUNCTION

Determining the need for employees: Continually determine the department’s need for employees, both in number and job position.

Developing job descriptions and job specifications: Ask employees to write down the tasks they perform during a time period to help develop a job description. The supervisor should periodically evaluate, modify, or reassign each job description.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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HOW TO DEVELOP JOB DESCRIPTIONS

The following steps were developed for the preparation of a job description for the position of housekeeper in a hospital.

Step 1. Prepare a questionnaire to be sent to housekeeping employees and their supervisors, asking what they feel are the major functions and subfunctions that must be performed to do their job effectively.

Step 2. Have several higher-level managers who are interested in the housekeeping list what functions they feel should and should not be performed by housekeepers.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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HOW TO DEVELOP JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Step 3. Find out from others in the organization what they believe should be and should not be the functions of a housekeeper.

Step 4. Tabulate the results of the three sources given above.

Step 5. Reconcile the differences of the three viewpoints with the objectives of your organization, and prepare a detailed list of activities to be performed.

Step 6. Classify activities as major and minor activities.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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HOW TO DEVELOP JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Step 7. Determine what each housekeep needs to know, what qualifications are necessary to perform designated activities, and specifically why each activity is to be performed.

Step 8. Submit the results of Steps 5 to 7 to a committee of housekeepers and supervisors for discussion and recommendations. You may find that you have asked employees to do more than could reasonably be accomplished. Revise and finalize the job description and job specification.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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HOW TO DEVELOP JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Step 9. Periodically—at least annually—review and revise the job description, following the 8 steps listed, when you feel that changes in products, equipment, the economic climate, or service demands necessitate a change in the job to be performed.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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FILLING JOB OPENINGS

Determining how many to hire:

Before requesting additional help, make sure that existing employees are being utilized fully and that additional help is necessary and within the budget.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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FILLING JOB OPENINGS

Assistance in recruitment and selection:

The human resources department is usually asked to recruit qualified applicants for open positions. Once the applicants have been screened, they are referred to the supervisor with the open position.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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FILLING JOB OPENINGS

Supervisors interview and decide:

The departmental supervisor should have the most say in making the final decision for hiring a candidate for a job. Selection criteria and laws protecting various classes of people should all be considered in selecting the final candidate.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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2

THE SELECTION PROCESS

Selectionis the process of screening applicants to choose the best person for the job.

The employee selection interview is often the most important part of the process.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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GOALS OF THE INTERVIEW

GOALS OF THE APPLICANT

1. To obtain information about the job.

2. To obtain information about the organization.

3. To determine whether the job matches his or her needs.

4. To determine whether he or she wants it.

5. To communicate important information about himself/herself.

6. To favorably impress the employer (the interviewer).

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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GOALS OF THE INTERVIEW

GOALS OF THE EMPLOYER (THE INTERVIEWER)

7. To promote the organization

8. To attract the best possible applicant.

9. To gather information about the applicant.

10. To assess how well the applicant’s qualifications match the job requirements.

11. To determine whether the applicant will fit in with the organization and other employees.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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THE SELECTION PROCESS

Basic Approaches to Interviewing

Directive Interview—Interviewer guides the discussion with a predetermined outline and objectives in mind. The interviewer covers the same topics with each applicant, then expands on related areas.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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THE SELECTION PROCESS

Basic Approaches to Interviewing

Nondirective Interview—Encourages interviewee to talk freely and in depth. This approach leads to great flexibility, but is more difficult and time-consuming to conduct.

Supervisors may want to use a blend of both directive and nondirective techniques to obtain the most helpful information.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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PREPARING FOR AND CONDUCTING AN EFFECTIVE SELECTION INTERVIEW

The supervisor must know what can be and should not be asked during an interview.

• Be careful not to ask questions that may be discriminatory or in violation of laws and regulations.

• Asking questions not directly related to the applicant’s ability to perform the job, or asking some questions selectively, could be considered discriminatory and in violation of federal law.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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PREPARING FOR AND CONDUCTING AN EFFECTIVE SELECTION INTERVIEW

Consider the Influence of Equal Employment

  • Selection criteria should pass the “OUCH” test:

    • Objective

    • Uniform in Application

    • Consistent in Effect

    • Has Job Relatedness

When a criterion does not meet the consistency standard, the burden of proof is on the employer to demonstrate that it is job related.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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PREPARING FOR AND CONDUCTING AN EFFECTIVE SELECTION INTERVIEW

  • Review the applicants’ backgrounds

  • Check backgrounds adequately

  • Prepare key questions

  • Use a conducive physical setting

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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PREPARING FOR AND CONDUCTING AN EFFECTIVE SELECTION INTERVIEW

Conducting the Employee Selection Interview

Opening the interview:Make the applicant feel at ease by opening with informal conversation or social amenities, but avoid excessive informality. Move to the interview after a few minutes.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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PREPARING FOR AND CONDUCTING AN EFFECTIVE SELECTION INTERVIEW

Conducting the Employee Selection Interview

Explaining the job:Discuss details of the job, working conditions, wages, benefits, and other relevant factors. • A realistic organizational preview (ROP) includes sharing complete information about the organization. • A realistic job preview (RJP) informs applicants about the desirable as well as undesirable aspects of the job.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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PREPARING FOR AND CONDUCTING AN EFFECTIVE SELECTION INTERVIEW

Conducting the Employee Selection Interview

Questioning effectively:Do not repeat information already found on the application but rephrase to probe for further information. Some questions may not be directly job-related but are nevertheless appropriate, such as questions about a desired salary level.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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PREPARING FOR AND CONDUCTING AN EFFECTIVE SELECTION INTERVIEW

Conducting the Employee Selection Interview

Taking notes:It is important to have a written record of the interview, especially with a large number of applicants.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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PREPARING FOR AND CONDUCTING AN EFFECTIVE SELECTION INTERVIEW

Avoid pitfalls in interviewing and evaluation:The chief problem in employee selection is interpreting the applicant’s information. Control personal biases, avoid generalizations, and do not fall prey to the “halo” or “horns” effect.

Halo or horns effect—Basing an impression of an individual on partial information and using that limited impression as a primary influence in rating all other factors. favorably (halo effect) unfavorably (horns effect)

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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PREPARING FOR AND CONDUCTING AN EFFECTIVE SELECTION INTERVIEW

Close the interview:Will applicant be hired on the spot? Will the decision be deferred? Will the applicant be rejected? The interviewer should let the candidate know. The applicant should leave feeling he or she has been treated fairly.

Post-interview evaluation form: Some organizations ask supervisors and members of the interview team to complete an evaluation form after an interview. This increases the likelihood that the same selection criteria are applied to each applicant.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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5

THE HIRING DECISION AND THE IMPORTANCE OF DOCUMENTATION

The hiring decision can be challenging.

Use judgment and experience and consult with the human resources department when difficult hiring decisions arise.

In some organizations, employees take part in hiring decisions; however, the supervisor must careful to conform to EEO regulations and avoid nepotism.

Recently, organizations have asked supervisors to document their reasons for hiring to confirm that they are job-related and not discriminatory.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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AN EFFECTIVE ORIENTATION PROGRAM

Orientation is a process designed to help new employees become acquainted with the organi-zation and understand the expectations the organization has for them.

Use a checklist:This will ensure important items are not missed in new employees’ orientations.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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AN EFFECTIVE ORIENTATION PROGRAM

Discuss the organization:Discuss the depart-ment and the organization with the new employee on the first day. However, be careful not to overload the employee with too much information.

Be supportive:The attitudes and behavior of the supervisor are more important in orienting new employees than the actual techniques used.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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AN EFFECTIVE ORIENTATION PROGRAM

Being supportive

Setting the Stage:Prepare the workgroup for the new employee. Help employees understand their purpose in the workgroup. Employee’s behavior can be shaped positively in many ways. Mentoring is one.

Mentoring:Have a more experienced person provide guidance, coaching, or counseling to a less experienced person. Mentoring can smooth the transition of new employees into the organization.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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THE SUPERVISOR’S ROLE IN EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT

New employees require both general and specific training.

Most training at the departmental level takes the form of on-the-job training. The supervisor, or a well-qualified individual, should provide the training.

Many training programs for all employees are conducted outside of the immediate work area (called off-the-job training). In some cases, companies work with college representatives to develop campus-based programs.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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THE SUPERVISOR’S ROLE IN EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT

Assess the skills and potential of employees and provide opportunities for ongoing development of skills.

Training must be viewed as an ongoing process.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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7

THE SUPERVISOR’S ROLE IN EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT

Some questions to ask as part of an employee development program are:

1. Who needs training?

2. What are the purposes of the training?

3. How will the training be evaluated?

Supervisors also need training and career development in order to avoid obsolescence and status-quo thinking.

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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END

Chapter 12/The Supervisor and Employee Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, and Training

Hilgert & Leonard © 2001


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