The education indicators concerning completion l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 18

The education indicators concerning completion PowerPoint PPT Presentation


It reports the current final grade intake at primary level stemming from previous years of schooling and past education policies on entrance to primary education. ...

Download Presentation

The education indicators concerning completion

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


The education indicators concerning completion l.jpg

The education indicators concerning completion


Indicators l.jpg

Indicators

1. Graduation Rate

2. Completion Rate

3. Cycle Completion Rate

4. Appeared and Pass Rate

5. Survival Rate

6. Retention Rate,

7. Transition Rate


1 graduation rate l.jpg

1. Graduation Rate

  • Definition

    • Gross graduation ratio: Number of graduates regardless of age in a given level or programme expressed as a percentage of the population at the theoretical graduation age for that level or programme.

  • Method of calculation

    • Divide the number of graduates regardless of age in a given level or programme by the population at the theoretical graduation age for that level or programme, and multiply by 100.

  • Interpretation

    • This indicator measures the degree to which children have completed, or are expected to successfully complete, primary education.


2 completion rate l.jpg

2. Completion Rate

  • Definition

    • Primary completion rate: the number of students successfully completing (or graduating from) the last year of primary school in a given year, expressed as a percentage of the total number of children of official graduation age in the population.

  • Method of calculation

    • Primary completion rate: the total number of students successfully completing (or graduating from) the last year of primary school in a given year, divided by the total number of children of official graduation age in the population and multiply by 100.

  • Interpretation

    • Because it measures both education system coverage and student attainment, the primary completion rate is a more comprehensive indicator of human capital formation and school system quality and efficiency than either gross or net enrolment ratios, or the cohort survival rate.


Measuring primary completion four different indicators l.jpg

Measuring Primary Completion: Four different indicators

Enrolment-based completion indicators

a) Gross Intake Ratio to the Last Grade of Primary (GIR-LGP)

b) Expected Gross Intake Ratio to the Last Grade of Primary (EGIR-LGP)

  • These are based on numbers of pupils enrolled.

  • They measure the degree to which children have reached, or are expected to reach, the final grade of primary.

    Graduation-based completion indicators

    c) Gross Primary Graduation Ratio (GP-GR)

    d) Expected Gross Primary Graduation Ratio (EGP-GR)

  • These are based on numbers of graduates.

  • They measure the degree to which children have completed, or are expected to successfully complete, primary education.


Slide6 l.jpg

  • However, UIS survey showed that not all countries have the same formal notion of graduation at the primary level as the secondary level.

  • At the primary level, children may be judged to have been “successful” in completing the cycle because they passed a final exam, because their teacher gave a favourable assessment, or by using other criteria.

  • Automatic promotion from primary to secondary is common, but in some countries selection may occur at the last grade of primary education because of the limited availability of places in lower secondary education.

  • For these reasons, indicators based on graduation should be used as a measure of progression and represent proxies for education outputs.

  • However, they are not measures of actual learning achievement.


The use of each indicator depends upon its purpose l.jpg

The use of each indicator depends upon its purpose

  • When assessing the results of an earlier policy related to access to education, the indicators reflecting last grade data- a) or c) are useful.

  • When forecasting the results of a current policy related to access, the other indicators are more sensitive – b) or d).


Definitions of indicators l.jpg

Definitions of indicators

Gross Intake Ratio to the Last Grade of Primary (GIR-LGP)

  • Total number of new entrants in the last grade of primary education, regardless of age, expressed as a percentage of the population of the theoretical entrance age to the last grade.

  • It reports the current final grade intake at primary level stemming from previous years of schooling and past education policies on entrance to primary education.

    Expected Gross Intake Ratio to the Last Grade of Primary (EGIP-LGP)

  • The number of children in a given year regardless of age who are expected to reach the last grade of primary education expressed as a percentage of the population at the theoretical entrance age to primary education in the same year.

  • It estimates the future gross intake to the last grade of primary education based on current new entrants to the first grade of primary education assuming current grade transition and repetition rates remain unchanged.

  • It predicts the effect on last grade intake of current education policies on entrance to primary education and future years of schooling.


Slide9 l.jpg

Gross Primary Graduation Ratio

  • Total number of graduates from the last grade of primary education, regardless of age, expressed as a percentage of the population a the theoretical graduation age.

  • It reports the current primary outputs stemming from previous years of schooling and past education policies on entrance to primary education

    Expected Gross Primary Graduation Ratio

  • The number of children in a given year regardless of age expected to graduate from primary education expressed as a percentage of the population of theoretical entrance age to primary education in the same year.

  • It estimates future gross primary graduation ratios based on current new entrants to the first grade of primary education assuming current grade transition, repetition and graduation rates remain unchanged.

  • It predicts the effect on primary outputs of current education policies on entrance to primary education and future years of schooling.


3 cycle completion rate l.jpg

3. Cycle Completion Rate


4 appeared and pass rate l.jpg

4. Appeared and Pass Rate


5 survival rate l.jpg

5. Survival Rate

  • Definition

    • Survival Rate to Grade 5 is the proportion of a cohort of pupils who reached Grade 5 expressed as a percentage of pupils enrolled in the first grade of a given cycle in a given school year.

    • Survival Rate to Grade n is the percentage of a cohort of pupils (or students) enrolled in the first grade of a given level or cycle of education in a given school year who are expected to reach a given grade (n).

  • Method of calculation

    • Divide the total number of pupils belonging to a pupil cohort who reached each successive grade of primary education by the number of pupils in the original pupil cohort, i.e. those pupils who enrolled together in the first grade of primary education, and multiply by 100.


Slide13 l.jpg

  • Interpretation

    • This indicator is used to show the extent to which the school system can retain pupils, with or without repetition, and indicates the dropout rate. It is also used to measure the impact of repetition and dropout on internal efficiency.

    • A survival Rate approaching 100 per cent indicates a high level of retention and low dropout incidence. Survival Rate may vary from grade to grade, giving indications of grades with relatively more or less dropouts. The distinction between survival rate with and without repetition is necessary to compare the extent of wastage due to dropout and repetition.

    • The Survival Rate to Grade 5 of primary education is of particularly interest since completion of at least four years of schooling is commonly considered a pre-requisite for a sustainable level of literacy.


6 retention rate l.jpg

6. Retention Rate

  • Definition

    • Percentage of students who enroll in a school-year that continues to remain in school (education institution) the following years.

  • Method of calculation

    • Divide the number of pupils enrolled in final grade by the number o pupils enrolled in the same pupil-cohort to the first grade at the corresponding year in the past, and multiply the result by 100.

  • Interpretation

    • A higher retention rate shows a better use of resources and also favorable progression of pupils (it corresponds to higher promotion rate and lower dropout rate)

    • This indicator interprets the information on the pupils attaining a certain grade or level of education and it is useful for comparisons of the system’s capacity in retaining pupils among states and divisions. This indicator reflects the efficiency of the school system and it can be applied in the monitoring education programmes and formulating of the decentralized school-based management strategies.


7 transition rate l.jpg

7. Transition Rate

  • Definition

    • Transition rate is the proportion of students that progress from the final grade of one level to the first grade of the next level, expressed as a percentage of those enrolled in the final grade of the preceding school year.

  • Method of calculation

    • Divide the number of new entrants in the first grade of the specified higher cycle or level of education by the number of students enrolled in the final grade of the preceding cycle or level of education in the previous school year, and multiply by 100.

New entrants to the first grade of the next higher level at school year t

Number of pupils in the last grade of the previous level at school year t-1

TR Pri to Sec, 1=

100


Slide16 l.jpg

  • Interpretation

    • It indicates the degree of access to the next higher level, measuring the upward mobility in the educational hierarchy.

    • High Transition Rates indicate high access or transition from one level of education to the next. It also reflects the intake capacity of the next level of education. Inversely, low transition rates indicate problems in bridging between two cycles or levels of education, due to either deficiencies in the examination system or inadequate admission capacity in the higher cycle or level of education.


Examples from global education digest 2005 l.jpg

Examples from Global Education Digest 2005


  • Login