Hunger is not natural right to food campaign 2008 2010 campaign
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Hunger is not naturalRight to Food campaign 2008/2010 Campaign

Enlarging FairCzech Republic, Italy, Hungary, Malta, Slovakia, Slovenia


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Right to food campaign

  • Why a campaign about the Right to Food?

  • It is necessary to take in consideration the food market when we talk about Fair Trade

  • the commodities have been among the first Fair Trade products (cocoa, coffee, sugar, tea, bananas)‏

  • The food market is more and more linked to the industrial farming model and to the speculation of the financial markets

  • In 2003, agriculture employed 2,3 billion people (FAOSTAT, 2004)‏

  • As a paradox, even if food prices increase, the food producers represent the majority of the 927 million people that are undernourished.

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Right to food campaign

  • “Unnatural” causes of the present food crisis

  • Present agricultural and food industry is business-oriented and damages natural resources – resulting in bad food quality

  • If food becomes a commodity, it will be subject to all possible market failures – among else, social injustice and bad environmental impact

  • The present food crisis has deep roots and causes originating back in time:

    1. Unsustainable agricultural politics

    2. Unfair trade regulation

    3. Agricultural benefits distorting the market situation

    4. Systemic marginalization of small producers

    5. Long-term lack of agricultural investments in the Global South

    6. Indifference to the preservation of existing ecosystems

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Right to food campaign

  • Costs in food production

  • In the past 50 years, food production has more than doubled to respond to increased demand on part of the market

    This has resulted in:

    1. Damage for 60% of the existing ecosystems

    2. Genetic diversity progressively decreases: as of now, four vegetal species (wheat, corn, rice, and potato) provide for more than 90% of the necessary calories for human nourishment; simultaneously, about 12 animal species provide for 90% of the globally consumed animal proteins.

    3. 75% of agricultural biodiversity has been lost: traditional knowledge and local farming techniques have disappeared in favor of a market-oriented agriculture

  • The most vulnerable farmers are prey to market oscillations, political instability, and climate change.

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Right to food campaign

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Undernourishment 1990Territory size shows the proportion of all undernourished people worldwide, that live there. www.worldmapper.org

Right to food campaign


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Right to food campaign

Undernourishment is not being able to meet the minimum level of dietary energy consumption - that required to be able to undertake daily tasks.This is measured against a minimum weight, which varies by height, age and gender.In 1990, 840 million people, or 16% of the world population were undernourished. The largest counts of undernourished people are found in India and China. The highest percentage of undernourished people was in Mozambique, where 69% of the population did not have enough to eat.Almost a quarter of all territories recorded no undernourishment in 1990. The regions of Japan, Eastern Europe and Western Europe are barely visible on the map.

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Right to food campaign

Undernourishment 2000 Territory size shows the proportion of all undernourished people worldwide, that live there. www.worldmapper.org


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Right to food campaign

Over the ten year period from 1990 to 2000, the number of people in the world that lived on an inadequate amount of food increased from 840 million to 858 million. Due to the population increases over this period, the percentage of the population that is undernourished simultaneously decreased from 16% to 14%.

Of all the people living in Central Africa, over 60% are undernourished. The Democratic Republic of Congo has the highest levels of undernourishment: 3 in every 4 people there are undernourished.

Reducing the proportion of undernourished peoples is an aim of Millennium Development Goal 1.

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Right to food campaign

Why?!Someone says..Environmental factors (trend to lower the sense of responsibility of politicians)Demographic factors (we are more, we eat more!)but in reality there's no global food scarcity, there's a problem of access to food

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Right to food campaign

  • We think is more likely related to:City centered policiesAgricultural export oriented policiesTrade liberalizationSpeculation

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Right to food campaign

  • Who profits most in the food chain

  • Producers of chemical fertilizers (Cargill’s Mosaic, Sinochem, Potash Corp): some of them have doubled their profits in 2007.

  • Sellers of products for agriculture (Cargill, ADM, Conagra, etc.), that have made 5.200 Euros (+50% on 2006)‏

  • Merchants of seed (Monsanto, +44%, DuPont, +19% Syngenta, +28%)‏

    Being in the position for exercising a direct control on the increasingly complex systems of the global market, these multinational corporations are able to make enormous profits out of food scarcity.

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Right to food campaign

  • Those who are subjected to the highest level of pressure in the present situation

  • Small owners, landless workers, and farmers located in marginal areas of the world, often ecologically vulnerable :

    1. They produce for foreign markets (cocoa, coffee, bananas, etc) and buy food for their own consumption on the market – products that are often manufactured in wealthy countries. Far from being a profit, the increase in prices is to them a dramatic event.

    2. They have no political support and cannot compete with industrial, public-funded agriculture.

    3. In order to survive, they are forced to leave the countryside and migrate to the towns.

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Fair Trade has something to say

Fair trade has a lot to say about all this, because the reasons for struggling against global poverty and injustice are part of its very DNA:

Inform about the roots and causes of hunger, reflecting on the processes that have brought to this dramatic food crisis

Promote a fair trade choice as a concrete instrument for struggling against global and international trade inequalities

Provide people with an opportunity to enact such a change through daily gestures oriented by responsible lifestyles – choices that might relocate the consumer and her/his power to inform the market at the very heart of the trade scenery.

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Stop the market of hunger For a fair food market

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Right to food campaign

  • Equal opportunity access to market means

  • To pay a fair price to producers, above market standards

  • To fully develop the local / national market beside exporting

  • Make land, water, and means of production available to small producers

  • Guarantee food sovereignty

  • Regulate trade and agricultural production for a sustainable development

  • Limit the dumping of food products

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Right to food campaign

  • Equal opportunity access to market does not mean

  • To block international trade and exchange; quite the other way, it means to promote politics and practices sustaining the right to food access for everyone, as well as an ecological, healthy, and safe food production

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Right to food campaign

Objectives

  • Make public opinion aware of the necessity for universal food access

  • Promote Fair Trade as a valid solution

  • Promote individual participation

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1. INFORM

  • The Right to Food campaign focuses on:

  • The globalization of the food market

  • Traditional industrial chains versus short chains in the Global North and South

  • The raw material market (coffee, cocoa, bananas, etc.)‏

  • Prices and dumping politics

  • The situation of rural women

  • Food and intercultural education

  • GMO and the protection of biodiversity/ free access to seed

  • Food production vs. production for alternative energy sources

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2. VALORIZE

  • We have very positive Fair Trade projects as examples

  • Navdanya, India (Rice)

  • Elements, India (Coffee, Cajou, Vanilla)‏

  • Parc, Palestine (Cous Cous, Almonds, Dates)

  • Coopeagri, Costa Rica (Bio sugar)

  • Uciri, Mexico (Coffee)

  • Podie, Sri lanka (Spices)

  • Wupperthal & Heiveld, South Africa (Rooibos)

  • Chankuap Foundation, Ecuador (essential oils)‏

  • Saterè Mawe, Amazzonia (guarana)‏

  • MCCH – Food Sovereignty Project

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3. INVOLVEMENT

  • I support the right to food

    1. Choose Fair Trade

    2. Choose organic

    3. Chooselocalfood

    4. Protect biodiversity

    5. Moderate meat consumption

    6. Avoidwaste

    7. No GMO, yes BIO

    8. Sustainethicalfinance

    9. Save energy and choose alternative energy (not biofuel!)‏

    10. Use water responsibly

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Right to food

  • The campaign addresses

  • Fair Trade volunteers

  • Consumers

  • Schools

  • Institutions and Administrations

  • Media

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Right to food

  • The Right to food campaign is promoted by the following European organizations, within the framework of the Enlarging Fair project

  • Ctm altromercato, Italy

  • Pangea-Niente Troppo, Italy

  • KKG - Koperattiva Kummerc Gust, Malta

  • Society for Fair Trade, Czech Republic

  • FAIRTRADE Slovakia

  • Umanotera, Slovenia

  • Védegylet Egyesület - Protect the Future Society, Hungary

Enlarging FairCzech Republic, Italy, Hungary, Malta, Slovakia, Slovenia


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