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THE MOVEMENT TO MAKE COLLEGE CAMPUSES TOBACCO-FREE PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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THE MOVEMENT TO MAKE COLLEGE CAMPUSES TOBACCO-FREE. Presentation at OSU-IT Okmulgee, Oklahoma August 24, 2009 By Ty Patterson Director The Center of Excellence for Tobacco-Free Campus Policy Ozarks Technical Community College Springfield Missouri .

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THE MOVEMENT TO MAKE COLLEGE CAMPUSES TOBACCO-FREE

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The movement to make college campuses tobacco free l.jpg

THE MOVEMENT TO MAKE COLLEGE CAMPUSES TOBACCO-FREE

Presentation at OSU-IT

Okmulgee, Oklahoma

August 24, 2009

By

Ty Patterson

Director

The Center of Excellence

for Tobacco-Free Campus Policy

Ozarks Technical Community College

Springfield Missouri


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ABOUT OTC AND THE CENTER OF EXCELLENCEFOR TOBACCO-FREE CAMPUS POLICY

  • Ozarks Technical Community College became tobacco-free in 2003

  • Overview of OTC

  • The Center of Excellence for Tobacco-Free Campus Policy est. 2004

  • Purposes of the Center of Excellence

  • Services provided

  • Experience with other institutions (Previous visit to OSU-IT)

  • The importance of each institution’s uniqueness


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HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

  • Higher education institutions have restricted tobacco use for decades.

  • Lack of enforcement of building perimeter and designated area tobacco policies and increasing evidence of the problem of exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) are primary reasons for making campuses tobacco-free.

  • In the aftermath of Virginia Tech and other problems on campuses there is growing interest in teaching respect for others--a key component of tobacco-free campus policy.


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REASONS OVER 150 COLLEGES HAVE ADOPTED TOBACCO-FREE POLICIES SINCE 2004

Area restrictions don’t work

Exposure to SHS is unsafe

Tobacco litter defaces the environment

Access for individuals with disabilities is threatened

Tobacco use is inherently disrespectful of others

Those under age are given tacit approval to use tobacco

Tobacco use conflicts with a commitment to wellness

Helps those who want to quit using tobacco

Contributes to institutional sustainability

Saves money through reduction in tobacco litter

Prepares students for tobacco-free work places


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KEYS TO SUCCESFUL TOBACCO-FREE CAMPUS POLICY

Know why you are adopting the policy

Set timeline for policy implementation

Tell employees, students, community why

Provide cessation help

Establish clear expectations of compliance

Explain consequences for non-compliance

Be respectful to all

Repeat why the policy is being adopted

Repeat expectations and consequences

Use all media available

Thank everyone for their cooperation

Teach, teach, teach….


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CHANGING THE CAMPUS CULTURE

A new and even more restrictive tobacco policy with the same method of enforcement is destined to fail

Self enforcement is the only method which will assure success

Teaching self enforcement prepares students for the work world

Respect for others and the environment becomes a hallmark of the institution

No enforcement method is 100% effective


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COMPLIANCE WITH INSTITUTIONAL POLICY

To successfully implement and sustain a tobacco policy it is important to nurture a campus culture of self enforcement.

You may ask, how do you nurture such a culture?

The answer is by having employees model compliance; and by teaching students that non-compliance with policy is not an option! Failure to teach this is to teach failure in the world for which we prepare our students.


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TEACHING COMPLIANCE

Having a policy regarding compliance may be helpful in establishing expectations and explaining why compliance is important. The following is an example of such a policy.


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TEACHING COMPLIANCE

Students, employees and visitors are required to comply with duly established institutional policies. These policies are available in Student Services, Human Resources, the Library and on the college’s web site. Failure to comply with Board of Trustees policies may result in disciplinary action including dismissal or loss of access to facilities and programs. Individuals have the right to seek policy changes and/or propose new policies through established processes outlined in the student and faculty handbooks and available on the web site. Until the Board of Trustees votes to change established policies or to adopt new policies, respectful compliance with current policies is required.


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TOBACCO POLICY AND CRITICAL THINKING

If the months leading up to implementation of the tobacco policy are used effectively to educate the campus community, critical thinking will be encouraged. Policies teach and good teaching develops critical thinking. Thus, questions such as what is the right thing to do about tobacco use on campus; and how best do we promote respect for others; for example, will generate critical thinking. In my experience higher education institutions do not normally take time to explain why they are adopting policies or their expectations for compliance. As a result, important learning opportunities are missed.


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RESOURCES/REFERENCES

Andrew Epstein, ALA of Oregon, [email protected]

Kim Homer-Vagadori, California Youth Action Network, [email protected]

Denise Ross, Stanly College, Albemarle North Carolina, [email protected]

Danielle Dill, University of Central Oklahoma, [email protected]

Linda Reisser, Portland Community College, [email protected]

John Laws, Ivy Tech-Lafayette Indiana, [email protected]

Margaret Hvatum, St. Louis Community College, [email protected]

Mary Alice Serafini, University of Arkansas, [email protected]

Additional Resources/References available at www.otc.edu/about/tobaccofree.php