Civil Liberties Quiz (Part 2)
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Civil Liberties Quiz (Part 2)

Click on the arrow to begin the quiz.


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SCOTUS said that it was unconstitutional for Rhode Island and Pennsylvania to pay benefits to teachers working in parochial (religious) schools...established a three-part test to determine when a law established religion. (secular purpose, etc…)

Miranda v. Arizona (1966)

Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)

Texas v. Johnson (1989)

Mapp v. Ohio (1961)

Katz v. United States (1967)

Lemon v. Kurtman (1971)


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Police obtained a search warrant to search a boarding house where they expected to find a suspect in a criminal case. The suspect was not there, but the police found and confiscated obscene materials. The owner was convicted of having the materials.SCOTUS said this is unconstitutional use of illiegally obtained evidence, applying the exclusionary rule to states via the 14th Amendment.

Miranda v. Arizona (1966)

Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)

Texas v. Johnson (1989)

Mapp v. Ohio (1961)

Katz v. United States (1967)

Lemon v. Kurtman (1971)


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SCOTUS ruled that police must establish be probable cause to wiretap and that a suspect is entitled to Fourth Amendment protection for his conversations

Miranda v. Arizona (1966)

Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)

Texas v. Johnson (1989)

Mapp v. Ohio (1961)

Katz v. United States (1967)

Lemon v. Kurtman (1971)


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Supreme Court of the United States invalidated prohibitions on desecrating the American flag (in force in 48 of the 50 states). Justice William Brennan wrote for a five-justice majority, holding that the defendant's act of flag burning was protected speech under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Miranda v. Arizona (1966)

Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)

Texas v. Johnson (1989)

Mapp v. Ohio (1961)

Katz v. United States (1967)

Lemon v. Kurtman (1971)


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A suspect in a rape case was was arrested, not informed of his rights, and later confessed to the crime. SCOTUS ruled that people must be informed of their rights (right to remain silent...etc) before custodial interrogation questioning.

Miranda v. Arizona (1966)

Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)

Texas v. Johnson (1989)

Mapp v. Ohio (1961)

Katz v. United States (1967)

Lemon v. Kurtman (1971)


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A suspect was accused of breaking into a pool room and stealing “loot.” He was denied the right to counsel in a Florida court and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. He petitioned the Court in forma pauperis for a writ of certiorari. SCOTUS ruled that in state criminal cases, defendants have the right to counsel.

Miranda v. Arizona (1966)

Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)

Texas v. Johnson (1989)

Mapp v. Ohio (1961)

Katz v. United States (1967)

Lemon v. Kurtman (1971)


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Incorrect stealing “loot.” He was denied the right to counsel in a Florida court and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. He petitioned the Court in forma pauperis for a writ of certiorari. SCOTUS ruled that in state criminal cases, defendants have the right to counsel.

Go back and try again.


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CORRECT stealing “loot.” He was denied the right to counsel in a Florida court and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. He petitioned the Court in forma pauperis for a writ of certiorari. SCOTUS ruled that in state criminal cases, defendants have the right to counsel.

Click on the arrow to advance to the next question.


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CORRECT stealing “loot.” He was denied the right to counsel in a Florida court and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. He petitioned the Court in forma pauperis for a writ of certiorari. SCOTUS ruled that in state criminal cases, defendants have the right to counsel.

Click on the arrow to advance to the next question.


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CORRECT stealing “loot.” He was denied the right to counsel in a Florida court and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. He petitioned the Court in forma pauperis for a writ of certiorari. SCOTUS ruled that in state criminal cases, defendants have the right to counsel.

Click on the arrow to advance to the next question.


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CORRECT stealing “loot.” He was denied the right to counsel in a Florida court and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. He petitioned the Court in forma pauperis for a writ of certiorari. SCOTUS ruled that in state criminal cases, defendants have the right to counsel.

Click on the arrow to advance to the next question.


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CORRECT stealing “loot.” He was denied the right to counsel in a Florida court and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. He petitioned the Court in forma pauperis for a writ of certiorari. SCOTUS ruled that in state criminal cases, defendants have the right to counsel.

Click on the arrow to advance to the next question.


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CORRECT stealing “loot.” He was denied the right to counsel in a Florida court and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. He petitioned the Court in forma pauperis for a writ of certiorari. SCOTUS ruled that in state criminal cases, defendants have the right to counsel.

Click on the arrow to start again.

Click on the happy dude to end.


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