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Lecture Ten Chapter Twelve. Interviewing for Effective Decisions. INTERVIEW DEFINED. A CONVERSATION THAT HAS A TIME LIMIT AND AN IDENTIFIABLE PURPOSE OTHER THAN ENJOYMENT. Barriers to Effective Interviews. DIFFERING INTENTION BIAS CONFUSING FACTS WITH INFERENCES NONVERBAL

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lecture ten chapter twelve

Lecture TenChapter Twelve

Interviewing for Effective Decisions

interview defined
INTERVIEW DEFINED
  • A CONVERSATION THAT HAS A TIME LIMIT AND AN IDENTIFIABLE PURPOSE OTHER THAN ENJOYMENT
barriers to effective interviews
Barriers to Effective Interviews
  • DIFFERING INTENTION
  • BIAS
  • CONFUSING FACTS WITH INFERENCES
  • NONVERBAL
  • FIRST IMPRESSIONS
  • ORGANIZATIONAL STATUS
possible remedies
Possible Remedies
  • Intentions
    • Both parties intend to have full exchange of information
  • Bias
    • Recognize personal bias
    • Halo Effect
  • Facts versus Inferences
    • Be alert to difference
  • Nonverbal
    • Primacy Effect (Similar to Halo)
  • First Impressions
    • Hypothesis Testing
  • Organizational Status
focus for effective interviews
FOCUS FOR EFFECTIVE INTERVIEWS
  • What is the Interview Objective?
    • Gather general or specific data or persuade
  • Where should it be conducted?
  • What is the best way to begin?
    • Open with purpose
  • What is best questioning strategy?
    • Structured
    • Unstructured
    • Semi-structured
  • Phrasing
    • Open-Closed
    • Primary-Secondary
    • Neutral-Directed
  • Notes
  • Close
interview format
PROBLEM SOLVING

Opening

Greet Interviewee

Establish common ground

State purpose

Body

Define problem

analyze problem

Propose solution

Select solution

Agree on action

Close

Provide summary

Summarize action to take

Make acknowledgments

INFORMATIVE

Opening

Greet interviewee

Establish Common Ground

State purpose

Body

Seek information

Question

Reflect

Verify

Summarize

Close

Provide summary

Summarize action to take

Make acknowledgments

INTERVIEW FORMAT
questions
QUESTIONS
  • Closed Ended (Require specific information and limited response and freedom for interviewee)
  • Probing Questions (Allows and encourages interviewee to expand on other answers)
  • Mirror Questions (Reflects back message sent by interviewee and encourages expansion)
  • Leading Questions (Influences the interviewee to respond a certain way)
notes
NOTES
  • Ask if OK
  • Keep them brief
  • Maintain eye contact
  • Keep from doodling
  • Avoid accentuating something
  • Review immediately after meeting
managerial role in interviews
MANAGERIAL ROLE IN INTERVIEWS
  • Make sure that all the information is gathered or the problem solved
  • Avoid unethical or illegal question
  • Create the climate which make the interview a positive or conducive experience
types of special interviews
TYPES OF SPECIAL INTERVIEWS
  • EMPLOYMENT
  • PERFORMANCE REVIEW
  • CONSTRUCTIVE DISCIPLINE
  • COUNSELING
employment
EMPLOYMENT
  • INTERVIEW LOW IN RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY
  • INTERVIEW IS THE PRIMARY SOURCE OF INFORMATION USED IN MAKING HIRING DECISIONS
employment continued
Know the job for which your are interviewing candidates (Characteristics)

Know what a successful candidate looks like (Goal)

Questions

Open

Closed

Establish a procedure (Time, Location, Metrics)

Review credentials ahead of interview

LET INTERVIEWEE TALK

KEEP RECORDS

LEGAL ISSUES

EEOC (Civil Rights Act of 1964)

BFOQ

Affirmative Action

Appropriate Questions

EMPLOYMENT(Continued)
examples of structured interview questions
Examples of Structured Interview Questions

Type

Example

Situational

Job

Knowledge

Worker

Requirements

You’re packing things into your car and getting

ready for your family vacation when it hits you

that you promised to meet a client this morning.

You didn’t pencil the meeting into your calendar

and it slipped your mind until just now. What

do you do?

What is the correct procedure for determining the

appropriate oven temperature when running a new

batch of steel?

Some periods are extremely busy in our business.

What are your feelings about working overtime?

unusual job interview behaviors
Unusual Job Interview Behaviors

Based on a nationwide survey of 200 executives conducted by Accountemps, the world’s largest temporary personnel service for accounting, bookkeeping, and information technology, the interview behavior of some jobseekers today can only be described as bizarre. Here are some of the more unusual behaviors respondents witnessed or heard of happening during a job interview:

  • “Left his dry cleaner tag on his jacket and said he wanted to show he was a clean individual.”
  • “After a difficult question, she wanted to leave the room momentarily to meditate.”
  • “Applicant walked in and inquired why he was here.”
  • “Said that if I hired him, I’d soon learn to regret it.”
  • “Said if he was hired, he’d teach me ballroom dancing at no charge, and started demonstrating.”
  • “Arrived with a snake around her neck. Said she took her pet everywhere.”

Fig. 5-9a

© 1998 by Prentice Hall

unusual job interview behaviors cont
Unusual Job Interview Behaviors (cont.)
  • “Women brought in a large shopping bag of canceled checks and thumbed through them during the interview.”
  • “When asked about loyalty, showed a tattoo of his girlfriend’s name.”
  • “Applicant indicated that if he wasn’t hired, the future of the company would be jeopardized for confidential reasons.”
  • Took three cellular phone calls. Said she had a similar business on the side.”
  • “She returned that afternoon asking if we could redo the entire interview.”

Fig. 5-9b

© 1998 by Prentice Hall

types of interviews performance
USE

Let employees know where they stand

Recognize good work

Communicate areas of improvement

Develop employees in present job

Discuss career paths

Use to measure entire department

Warn certain employees that they must improve

TYPES

HIGH PERFORMANCE

MAINTENANCE

REMEDIAL

TYPES OF INTERVIEWS PERFORMANCE
supportive environment see gibb pages 274 277
DEFENSIVE

EVALUATIVE

CONTROLLING

NEUTRALITY

SUPERIORITY

CERTAINTY

SUPPORTIVE

DESCRIPTIVE

PROBLEM ORIENTED

EMPATHY

EQUALITY

PROVISIONALISM

SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENTSee Gibb Pages 274-277
feedback
FEEDBACK
  • CONCRETE BEHAVIORS
  • AVOID INFERENCES ABOUT MOTIVES, INTENTS AND FEELINGS
  • LIMIT THE NUMBER OF BEHAVIORS DISCUSSED
  • PROVIDE FEEDBACK CLOSE TO EVENT
  • GIVE FEEDBACK TO HELP EMPLOYEE NOT STROKE YOUR EGO
  • ESTABLISH CLEAR GOALS (Numeric if possible)
constuctive disciplinary
CONSTUCTIVE DISCIPLINARY
  • ORAL WARNING - WRITTEN WARNING- LAYOFF- DISCHARGE
    • Is action necessary and appropriate
    • Be specific about behavior
    • Be consistent
    • Conduct it in a private place and immediately after the event
    • Make sure that the consequences of future problems is clear
    • Set specific time frame for correction
    • Record the interview in writing
  • COUNSELING INTERVIEW (EPA)
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