Chapter 13
Download
1 / 19

Chapter 13 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 263 Views
  • Uploaded on

Chapter 13. Customer and Stakeholder Relationship Marketing. Marketing Strategies in Non-Profit Organizations.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Chapter 13' - Jimmy


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Chapter 13 l.jpg

Chapter 13

Customer and Stakeholder Relationship Marketing


Marketing strategies in non profit organizations l.jpg
Marketing Strategies in Non-Profit Organizations

  • Nonprofit organizations need effective marketing. Nonprofits must apply the same aspects of marketing as their counterparts in profit seeking organizations. For instance, marketing applications such as customer orientation, targeting, and an integrated marketing plan are very relevant to nonprofit organizations.


Elements of the marketing mix l.jpg
Elements of the Marketing Mix

  • The critical elements of each of the four P's of the marketing mix are identified here. You should gain an appreciation of the depth and breadth of the marketing mix.

  • The responsibility of the marketing manager in building the four P's into a cohesive marketing program is also highlighted. You should see how all four elements must fit together to be effective.

  • By now you should see that a firm's survival often depends on its ability to spot trends in its environment and then turn them into advantages. One of the key trends today is delighting customers.


Uses of marketing research l.jpg
Uses of Marketing Research

  • The key term here is analyze. Marketing research is often predictive and certainly helps formulate a foundation for marketing decisions. Research is conducted in both pre- testing and post-testing situations. Often before product development, marketers test to see it there is potential for the good, service, or idea. After the product is in the market, users are queried for their opinions or suggestions on how to make the product better.


Guidelines for market research l.jpg
Guidelines for Market Research

  • If you stay focused on these guidelines, you can see how the process evolves. It's important to understand that the purpose of research is to either solve problems or locate opportunities. Therefore, the services of a professional researcher are often called into action. Such firms has A. C. Nielsen because of their television ratings systems or Louis Harris because of extensive polling are used to determine Americans preferences.


The marketing environment l.jpg
The Marketing Environment

  • Marketers conduct what is called an environmental scan. Here are some examples.

  • Social -- Can you seen how population shifts will alter the marketing process as we know it today and create opportunities for the future? The aging of America could play a significant role here.

  • Economic -- What industries are a particularly hard by economic downturns such as a recession. What items do consumers postpone purchasing?

  • Technological -- how has technology revolutionized customer expectations? What research benefits do companies receive from advances such as barcodes?

  • Global -- Considered some information presented in chapter 3. For example, 95 percent of the world's population lives outside the United States.

  • The environment of marketing the changing faster than at any time in history. Companies that don't keep up, go under.


Urban adult spending habits l.jpg
Urban Adult Spending Habits

  • Marketers conduct what is called an environmental scan. Here are some examples.

  • Social -- Can you seen how population shifts will alter the marketing process as we know it today and create opportunities for the future? The aging of America could play a significant role here.

  • Economic -- What industries are a particularly hard by economic downturns such as a recession. What items do consumers postpone purchasing?

  • Technological -- how has technology revolutionized customer expectations? What research benefits do companies receive from advances such as barcodes?

  • Global -- Considered some information presented in chapter 3. For example, 95 percent of the world's population lives outside the United States.

  • The environment of marketing the changing faster than at any time in history. Companies that don't keep up, go under.


The abc s of marketing l.jpg
The ABC’s of Marketing

  • You should recognize by now the need for marketing in all types of organizations. Clearly, profit seeking businesses are heavily involved in marketing but so are government and nonprofit businesses. Think of the various marketing efforts carried out by Valencia to recruit students and present a positive image to a community.


Consumer decision making process l.jpg
Consumer Decision Making Process

  • Sociocultural influences present the most interesting area for consideration. Can you relate how the different reference groups influence purchases especially in terms of products such as music, clothes, athletic shoes, and movies?

  • Situational influences are as simple as impulse displays at checkout counters. More sophisticated purchases might be influenced by the desire to "keep up with the Joneses".


Successful marketing in small organizations l.jpg
Successful Marketing in Small Organizations

  • Some things to consider in a small business:

  • Approximately 20 percent of a small company's customers account for 80 percent of its sales. Know what your customers are looking for and be ready to satisfy their needs.

  • Organizations should not focused on short-term returns. Scoring once is not the key to success. Building enduring relationships is the key to long-term profitability.

  • Crossover marketing is becoming very popular. What this involves is two businesses sharing customers in some way. For example, a theater may enter into an agreement with a restaurant where they offer joint discounts to customers. Implementing strategic alliances with other businesses also makes good long-term sense.

  • With fewer financial resources available, small businesses need to rely on a good deal of creativity. Writing personal letters to customers may sound corny or sappy, but often they send a special message to the customer that she/he is important.


ad