The role of pre school and primary education in protection against developmental risk
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The Role of Pre-school and Primary Education in Protection Against Developmental Risk. The Longview Conference: Escape from Disadvantage 3 October 2008. Kathy Sylva and James Hall Department of Education, University of Oxford. Presentation Outline.

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The role of pre school and primary education in protection against developmental risk l.jpg
The Role of Pre-school and Primary Education in Protection Against Developmental Risk

The Longview Conference:

Escape from Disadvantage

3 October 2008

Kathy Sylva and James Hall

Department of Education, University of Oxford


Presentation outline l.jpg
Presentation Outline Against Developmental Risk

Education, protection, and risks in the EPPE study

Main effects of social class

Main effects of children’s education

Effects of education vary by social class

An in-depth exploration into variations in the effects of educational quality on children at risk


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The Effective Pre-school and Primary Education (EPPE) research team:

Principal Investigators:

Kathy Sylva Department of Education, University of Oxford

Edward Melhuish Birkbeck, University of London

Pam Sammons University of Nottingham

Iram Siraj-Blatchford Institute of Education, University of London

Brenda Taggart Institute of Education, University of London

Researchers:

Stephen Hunt Institute of Education, University of London

(Sofka Barreau Department of Education,University of Oxford)

Helena Jelicic Institute of Education, University of London

Olga Cara Institute of Education, University of London

Rebecca Smees Institute of Education, University of London

Wesley Welcomme Institute of Education, University of London

A Longitudinal Study Funded by the DCSF

An ESRC/TLRP Project


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1. Education, protection, and risks in the EPPE study research team:

  • A longitudinal study funded by the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF):

    • Effective Provision of Preschool Education Project

      (EPPE) 1997-2003

    • Effective Preschool and Primary Education Project

      (EPPE 3-11) 2003-2007

    • Effective Preschool, Primary and Secondary Education Project

      (EPPSE 3-14) 2007-2011

  • These studies focus on the progress and development of 3,000 children from entering preschool to the end of Key Stage Three (3 to 14 years of age)


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Design of EPPE: 6 LAs & 3,000 children research team:

Pre-school Provision (3+ yrs)

Yr 1

Yr 2

Reception

Yr 5

Yr 6

25 nursery classes

590 children

Key Stage 1

600 Schools

Key Stage 2

1000 Schools

34 playgroups

610 children

31 private day nurseries

520 children

20 nursery schools

520 children

24 local authority day care nurseries

430 children

7 integrated centres

190 children

home

310 children


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Assessments research team:


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Developmental risks and protection research team:

  • Many measures of disadvantage were found to pose a risk to development.

    • e.g. SES, ethnicity, Home Learning Environment

  • Various aspects of education were found to mitigate the impacts of these risks.

    • i.e. confer protection



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Net effects of Mothers’ Qualifications research team:on Reading at age 10




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ECERS-R age 10

Harms, Clifford, and Cryer (1998)

Space and Furnishings

Personal Care Routines

Language Reasoning

Activities

Interaction

Programme Structure

Parents and Staff

ECERS-E

Sylva, Siraj-Blatchford, and Taggart (2006)

Language

Mathematics

Science and Environment

Diversity

Assessing the quality of pre-school




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4. Effects of education vary by social class anti-social behaviour at age 11


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Effects of Social Class on Reading and Writing at age 7 anti-social behaviour at age 11

READING at key stage 1,

social class and

pre-school experience

WRITING at key stage 1,

social class and

pre-school experience



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Effects of educational quality vary by social class group)

At Year 6 (age 10) for social behaviours:

  • The quality of the curricular provision of pre-schools had a larger effect for those children who:

    • Had Special Educational Needs (SEN)

      • (Outcomes: Self-regulation, pro-social behaviour, hyperactivity, anti-social behaviour)

    • Scored highly on the Index of Multiple Disadvantage

      • (Outcomes: Hyperactivity, anti-social behaviour)


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5. An in-depth exploration into variations in quality effects

ESRC CASE study examining:

  • Developmental Risks

  • Developmental Resilience

  • Whether pre-school quality could act to Protect development

    Conceptualised a ‘Family level risk’ that included measures that

    are indicative of “disadvantage”


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The Analyses effects(Structural Equation Models)

Hypothesised Protection

(

direct effects of

Pre-school Quality

q

uality

)

(forming)

Abilities/Behaviour at

14 Observed

Family level

Risk

Risks

entry to reception (~58m)

(effects of risks

post pre

-

school

(effects of risks prior t

o pre-school

Abilities/Behaviour at

entry to preschool (~37m)

Key:

Correlation

Observed variable

Regression

Unobserved variable

Moderated Regression (Risk x Protection)


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Familial risks forming a family level ‘combined risk’ effects

*p < .05 **p < .01 ***p < .001(Significant risks only; 10 of 14)

a: Unstandardardized factor loadings set to 1 so there is no returned significance


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Impacts of Combined Family Risk to Development effects

*p < .05 **p < .01 ***p < .001



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Significant protectors against family level ‘combined risk’/disadvantage:

At entry to reception class:

  • General Cognitive Ability

    • Quality of Curricular Provision (ECERS-E; 0.03**)

    • Global/Overall Quality (ECERS-R; 0.03***)

    • Average Childcare qualifications of staff (over time; 0.02*)

    • Number of caregiving staff (over time; 0.01*)

  • Self Regulation

    • None

  • Anti-Social Behaviour

    • Positive Staff-Child relationship (CIS; over time; -0.03*)

*p < .05 **p < .01 ***p < .001


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For further Information about EPPE visit the risk’/disadvantage:EPPE website atwww.ioe.ac.uk/projects/eppeor Tel (+44) 2076 126 219 Brenda Taggart Research Co-ordinator ([email protected])

or the DfES website at: www.dfes.gov.uk/research

Visit the FELL research group at: http://www.education.ox.ac.uk/research/resgroup/fell


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