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Colorado Prevention Partners. Presenter Chuck Klevgaard. Social Marketing. Theory / Logic / Implementation. Modules. Theory of Social Marketing Setting Communication Goals Utilizing The Blueprint - SPF Utilizing Data to Drive and Evaluate

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Social Marketing

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Social marketing

Colorado Prevention Partners

Presenter

Chuck Klevgaard

Social Marketing

Theory / Logic / Implementation


Modules

Modules

  • Theory of Social Marketing

  • Setting Communication Goals

  • Utilizing The Blueprint - SPF

  • Utilizing Data to Drive and Evaluate

  • A Framework for Developing a Cohesive Communication Plan


Objectives

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe the theory of Social Marketing

  • List at least four ways to segment an audience

  • Define the 4Ps (product, price, place, promotion).

  • Recognize examples of the 4Ps in selected radio PSAs.

  • Utilize a planning process that incorporates the Strategic Prevention Framework

  • Describe the importance of evaluating communication programs, even with resource constraints.


What is social marketing

What is Social Marketing

  • Advertising and marketing are major industries in our society, accounting for billions of dollars in expenditures.

  • Tobacco and alcoholic beverage industries, among others, spend this money on sophisticated marketing strategies to persuade people to buy their products.

Central Region


What is social marketing1

What is Social Marketing

  • These same marketing techniques can be used to discourage smoking and drinking and other drug abuse.

  • When commercial marketing techniques are adapted to communications about health and social issues, the process is known as social marketing.

Central Region


Differences between commercial and social marketing

Differences: Between Commercial and Social Marketing

  • Commercial Marketing:

    • Product-focused

    • Benefits marketer/producer

    • “do to” customers

  • Social Marketing:

    • Customer-focused

    • Benefits customer/community

    • “do with” customers

Central Region


The goal of social marketing

The Goal of Social Marketing

Human behavior change is the bottom line

How do we create change

Central Region


Social marketing power point

Tobacco UseWhy Did So Many Quit ?

Information

Skills

Norms

Motivation

Price

Policy


Social marketing power point

Seat BeltsWhy so many buckled up?

Information

Skills

Norms

Motivation

Laws

Enforcement


Chicken or the egg

Chicken or the Egg ?

  • Does Social Policy change norms or do changes in norms lead to policy change?

  • One approach to prevention seeks to modify the elements or conditions in our social environment that condone / encourage unhealthy or risky behavior or promote healthy behavior.


Synergy

Synergy

  • Policy :provides direction for the campaign strategy

  • Social Marketing:targets the specific behavior to encourage or discourage

  • Branding:brings the two together to create synergy

    Synergy refers to the phenomenon in which two or more discrete influences or agents acting together create an effect greater than that predicted by knowing only the separate effects of the individual agents.


How is social marketing used in prevention sample logic model tobacco

How is Social Marketing Used in PreventionSample Logic Model : Tobacco

Problem

Strategies

Intermediate Outcomes

Long Term Outcomes

Tobacco use by youth

Support Policies to Reduce Initiation of Tobacco

_________

Increased Enforcement of Access Policy

_________

Controls on Marketing

_________

Education and Skills Programs

Increased Price for Tobacco

_________

Decreased Access to Tobacco _________

Reduced Susceptibility to Tobacco Use

_________

Increased knowledge / Attitudes Toward Tobacco Use

Reduced Initiation of Tobacco Use

_________

Reduced Tobacco use Prevalence Among Youth People


Tobacco social marketing

Tobacco Social Marketing

Click here to see your Squirt Alert.

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How is social marketing used in prevention sample logic model alcohol

How is Social Marketing Used in Prevention Sample Logic Model : Alcohol

Problem

Strategies

Intermediate Outcomes

Long Term Outcomes

Increased Enforcement _________

Reduced Susceptibility to Alcohol Use

_________

Increase in Family Level Policy and Enforcement

Decreased Access to Alcohol

_________

Reduced Initiation of Alcohol Use

_________

Reduced Alcohol use Prevalence

Youth Have Easy Access to Alcohol at Bars Restaurants and Package Stores

Compliance Checks

________

Shoulder Taps

________

Social Host Enforcement

________

Social

Marketing

________

Safe Homes

Youth Have Easy Access to Alcohol from Friends, Family and 21-25 Year Olds Who Purchase


Why social marketing

Why Social Marketing

  • Well-designed campaigns, Dr. Cappella noted, can affect behavior, as demonstrated by research on smoking and drug use among teens.

  • “For example, an antimarijuana public service announcement (PSA) campaign developed by NIDA-supported researchers at the University of Kentucky in Lexington decreased marijuana use by more than 25 percent among high-sensation-seeking adolescents -- a group particularly at risk for drug abuse.”

    (See "Television Public Service Announcements Decrease Marijuana Use in Targeted Teens.") The PSAs included messages especially designed to appeal to the sensation-seeking teens and ran for 4 months during TV programs popular with this group.


What social marketing can do

What Social Marketing Can Do

  • Create awareness and interest

  • Change attitudes and conditions

  • Motivate people to want to change their behavior

  • Empower people to act

  • Prevent backsliding


7 steps putting it all together

7 StepsPutting It All Together

  • Assessment

    • Step 1: Communication Objective

  • Capacity

  • Planning

    • Step 2: Planning

    • Step 3: Design

    • Step 4: Pre-testing

  • Implementation

    • Step 5: Implementing

    • Step 6: Monitoring

  • Evaluation

    • Step 7: Evaluation

Northeast Region


Step 1 analysis

Step 1: Analysis

  • Define the issue you are planning to address

  • Use Formative Research (with a targeted strategy)

  • Identify resources or organizations that can help you

  • Identify and ally with the community services or other resources your customers can access for help

Assessment

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Step 1 analysis communications objective

Step 1: AnalysisCommunications Objective

Define your communications objective

  • one-sentence description

  • expected behavior outcome

  • measurable outcomes

Assessment

Central Region


Communication objectives the evidence for health communication

Assessment

Communication ObjectivesThe Evidence For Health Communication

  • Increase awareness and impart information about a health issue (Sample Cambridge)

  • Increase awareness about a new or existing or needed law

  • Publicize a community-based program

  • Reinforce instruction taught in schools or community-based organizations

  • A campaign can also be used to strengthen and reinforce prevention messages that youth receive in school and other settings


Communication objectives the evidence for health communication1

Assessment

Communication ObjectivesThe Evidence For Health Communication

  • Advocacy For Healthy Public Policy As A Health Promotion Technology Michael McCubbin, Ph.D., Ronald Labonte, Ph.D., Bernadette Dallaire, Ph.D.MS Word, 177KB

  • Community development: How effective is it as an approach in health promotion?John Raeburn, Tim CorbettMS Word, 187 KB

  • Effectiveness of Mass Media Health Campaigns Slides and PaperVicki FreimuthPowerPoint, 207KB and MS Word, 48KB

  • Generalizing From Idiosyncratic Research to "Best Practices" in other Settings and PopulationsLawrence GreenMS Word, 91 KB

  • Promoting Health Through Organizational ChangeHarvey Skinner  Ph.DMS Word, 86 KB

  • Reviewing the Evidence on the Effectiveness of Health Education: Methodological ConsiderationsAlison TaubMS Word, 118 KB

  • The Effectiveness of Policy in Health Promotion and AppendixNic DoyleMS Word, 133 KB and 62KB


Step 1 example

Assessment

Step 1: Example

We will increase by 50% the number of middle school parents who complete next semester’s “Parenting for Prevention” seminar.

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Example

Assessment

Example

Parents/caregivers will understand social host laws and agree not to serve alcohol to minors in their homes.

Central Region


Social host campaigns

Assessment

Social Host Campaigns


Example1

Assessment

Example

Parents/caregivers work to reduce underage access to alcohol

Central Region


Example2

Assessment

Example

Parents and other adults will understand the rationale for and support the drinking age.

Central Region


Example3

Assessment

Example

Parents/caregivers will talk with their preteens about drinking.

Central Region


National campaigns

Assessment

National Campaigns


Step 2 planning

Planning

Step 2: Planning

  • Segment Audience

  • Allocate resources

  • Do project management planning

  • Strategy for each customer segment

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Step 2 planning define your audience

Planning

Step 2: PlanningDefine Your Audience

  • Be as specific as possible about the group you will be targeting and learn as much as you can about them.

  • For example, you might describe a group as “heterosexual males between the ages of 14 and 18 who smoke.”

  • You will need to understand their attitudes, feelings, beliefs, values, motivation, and culture—all the factors that might influence their behavior.

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Step 2 planning five ways to segment your audience

Planning

Step 2: PlanningFive Ways to Segment Your Audience

  • Demographic Factors

    • Age, gender, educational attainment, socio-economic, ethnic background

    • School attending

    • Neighborhood residing

  • Type of Risk or Protective Factors

  • Parenting status

    • Age of children

    • Location of children

  • Drinking or Drug Use Status

  • Substance Used

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Step 2 planning define your audience1

Planning

Step 2: PlanningDefine Your Audience

  • Instead of selling products, social marketers sell knowledge and awareness of health risks,

  • or they market the benefits of certain health behaviors, such as avoiding alcohol and other drugs by youth, in ways that will appeal to this target audience.

Central Region


Social marketing power point

Planning

Step 2: PlanningDefine Your Audience

  • Information about the target audience includes not only needs and perceptions, but also knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding alcohol and other drugs; values; age; gender; educational background; income; and cultural and ethnic background.

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Step 2 planning define your audience2

Planning

Step 2: PlanningDefine Your Audience

In some cases the target audience is the affected population. For example, if our social marketing campaign attempts to convince smokers to quit for the improvement of their health, the affected population is our target audience. In other cases, we target an audience which is not the population directly affected by the problem.For example, a campaign might attempt to deliver a message to bartenders (the target audience to call taxicabs for intoxicated patrons (the affected population) who will potentially be involved in auto collisions while intoxicated. Effective social marketing campaigns often have multiple target audiences, which usually include the affected population and other individuals and groups which influence the environment of the affected population.

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Step 2 planning define your audience3

Planning

Step 2: PlanningDefine Your Audience

  • The description of the target audience becomes the basis for making decisions about what message to communicate, how and where to communicate it, and what appeal to use.

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Social marketing power point

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Social marketing power point

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Step 2 planning define your audience4

Planning

Step 2: PlanningDefine Your Audience

Secondary Audience: Paying Client

  • Agency

  • Foundation

  • Donors

  • Funders

Central Region


Step 2 planning define your audience5

Planning

Step 2: PlanningDefine Your Audience

Gatekeepers

  • School officials

  • Company management

  • Government officials

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Step 2 planning define your audience6

Planning

Step 2: PlanningDefine Your Audience

Phantom or Unintended Audiences

  • General public

  • Taxpayers

  • Politicians

  • Opposition

  • Youth

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Step 3 design

Planning

Step 3: Design

  • Plan and design needed support

  • Sample Blueprint

Central Region


Step 3 design determine the message

Planning

Step 3: DesignDetermine the Message

  • Social Marketing Message Must:

    • Capture the audience

    • Be meaningful

    • Provide one, small practical step

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Social marketing power point

http://www.itsonyou.org/


Step 3 design identify benefits

Planning

Step 3 DesignIdentify Benefits

  • Recognizing that competing behaviors are a major factor in customer behavior

    • Old habits

    • Social pressure

    • Lack of Information

    • Opposing cultural values

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Step 3 design define current attitudes and beliefs of the target audience

Planning

Step 3 Design:Define current attitudes and beliefs of the target audience

  • Benefits and costs

  • Concerns about reactions

  • Competing behaviors

  • Misconceptions

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Step 3 design identify benefits1

Planning

Step 3 Design:Identify Benefits

  • Emphasize problems with competing behaviors or emphasize benefits gained by adopting new behavior

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Social marketing power point

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Step 3 design define the attitudes you want to instill in your target audience

Planning

Step 3 Design:Define the attitudes you want to instill in your target audience

  • Differentiate between what they believe now, and what you want them to believe

  • Corrections of misconceptions

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Example4

Planning

Example

If people believe your message is simply “Smoking is bad” they will agree and hope you will go away soon. If they clearly understand, however, that your message is “Cigarette smoke is bad for children to breath so they shouldn’t be in cars or buildings with smoke” they are far more likely to believe their kids should not be in smoky environments.

Central Region


Step 3 design define behaviors you want your target audience to adopt

Planning

Step 3 Design: Define behaviors you want your target audience to adopt.

  • Describe the behavior

  • Outline the steps to make the change

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Social marketing power point

Planning

What's The Massage ?

What's Missing ?

Because there’s no sympathy card sympathetic enough

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Social marketing power point

Planning

SAFE GUN STORAGE SAVES KIDS’ LIVES

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Step 3 design identify support for your message or barriers to change

Planning

Step 3: DesignIdentify support for your messageor Barriers to Change

  • Support

    • Relevant research

    • Role models

    • Laws, rules, trends, norms

  • Barriers

    • Real and perceived

    • E.g. transportation or socioeconomic

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Step 3 design define your primary selling proposition

Planning

Step 3: DesignDefine your primary selling proposition

  • Cause and Effect or If-Then Statements

  • Negative or Positive Approach

  • Normative

  • Educational

  • Realistic, Relevant, Honest Messages

Northeast Region


If then

If Then

  • If Middle School parents understood the risks of not providing supervision between 3-6 p.m Then they would enroll in after school programs


Activity planning cambridge parent survey

Planning

Activity: PlanningCambridge Parent Survey


Perceived and real barriers

Perceived and Real Barriers

I can’t get him there

transportation

My Kids doesn’t want to go

Frankly, there are so many, I don’t know which one to pick

I don’t know where they are


Activity planning cambridge parent survey 20 minutes

Activity: PlanningCambridge Parent Survey – 20 Minutes

  • Read the Results

  • Identify a selling proposition based on the information learned about the target audience(If-Then Statements, Negative or Positive Approach, Normative, Educational, Realistic, Relevant, Honest Messages)

  • Support that proposition with data

  • If the data supports more than one approach, what will you do to make the decision?


Step 3 design identify the tone of your message

Planning

Step 3 DesignIdentify the tone of your message

  • Choices about style and tone

  • Assessments of how tone will play with audiences

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Example describing your tone

Planning

Example: Describing Your Tone

The tone will be non-condescending to middle school parents. Warm and inviting, not foreboding or threatening.

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Step 3 tone impact quincy

Planning

Step 3: ToneImpact Quincy

  • The personality


Step 3 tone impact quincy1

Planning

Step 3: ToneImpact Quincy


Step 3 design the four p s

Planning

Step 3 Design : The Four P’s

Marketing strategies accommodate consumer focus by addressing the "Four P's": product, price, place, and promotion

Product refers to the item( brochure, class, new behavior) or concept you want to promote.

Price refers to the cost of using a product or changing a behavior.

Place describes the channels you will use to reach your target audience.

Promotion refers to the strategies you will use to create and sustain demand for the product. (cost, benefit, personality or tone)


Step 3 design analyze this psa abc s

Planning

Step 3 DesignAnalyze This PSA: ABC’s

The first PSA is about underage drinking

In your group answer the following questions:

Target audience:

Affected Population

Product:

Price:

Promotion:

Action Step:

Place:


Step 3 design analyze this psa abc s1

Planning

Step 3 DesignAnalyze This PSA: ABC’s

The first PSA is about underage drinking

In your group answer the following questions:

Target audience: Mothers of 8 Year Olds

Affected Population Youth

Product: Staying alcohol free, communicate

Price: Giving up your opportunity to influence your child's decision to drink

Promotion: Emotional appeal. They grow up quickly and you can’t wait

Action Step: Communicate

Place: Radio (When in Your Community)


Step 3 design analyze this psa police

Planning

Step 3 Design Analyze This PSA: Police

The second PSA is about consequences of drinking

In your group answer the following questions:

Target Audience: Parents with teenagers

Affected Population : Youth of driving age

Product: Avoiding legal consequences

Price: Conversation

Promotion: Empowering Appeal: “your words matter”

Action Step: Make your feelings known

Place: Radio


Step 3 design analyze this psa oxy

Planning

Step 3 DesignAnalyze This PSA: Oxy

The third PSA is about prescription drug use

In your group answer the following questions:

Target Audience: Parents and teenagers

Affected Population : Youth and young adults

Product: Dealing with Addiction

Price: Difficulty of not giving up

Action Step: Treatment

Promotion: Support and treatment work

Place: Radio, time of day?, Place they must go?


Step 3 design identify channels

Planning

Step 3 DesignIdentify Channels

  • Social marketing often requires creating strategic partnerships with community resources

  • Choosing Channels of Communication

Northeast Region


Step 3 design identify channels1

Planning

Step 3 DesignIdentify Channels

  • The major media channels--television, radio, newspaper, and magazines--are often the first that come to mind when you're planning a communication campaign. And they do have some definite advantages.


Step 3 design identify channels2

Planning

Step 3 DesignIdentify Channels

  • Mass Media Channels

  • Community Channels

  • Pros and Cons


Step 3 design identify channels3

Planning

Step 3 DesignIdentify Channels

Studies of mass media campaigns have shown that the mass media are most effective at changing behavior when they are supplemented with interpersonal channels. These are channels that offer an opportunity for one-on-one communications. School counselors talking with students is one example. What are some others?

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Step 3 design channels communication dimensions

Planning

Step 3 DesignChannels – Communication Dimensions

  • reach (proportion of community exposed to the message)

  • specialization (targetability for reaching specific subgroups)

  • intrusiveness (capability for overcoming selectivity and commanding attention)

  • safeness (avoidance of risk of boomerang or irritation)

  • participation (active receiver involvement while processing stimulus)

  • meaning modalities (array of senses employed in conveying meaning)

  • personalization (human relational nature of messenger-receiver interaction)

  • decodability (mental effort required for processing stimulus)

  • depth (channel capacity for conveying detailed and complex content)

  • credibility (believability of material conveyed)

  • agenda-setting (potency of channel for raising salience priority of issues)

  • accessibility (ease of placing messages in channel)

  • economy (low cost for producing and disseminating stimuli)

  • efficiency (simplicity of arranging for production and dissemination).

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Media plus strategies

Planning

Media Plus Strategies

  • Services/ Agencies

  • Referrals / Hotlines

  • Information / Education

  • Policy / Advocacy


Media plus strategies resources

Planning

Media Plus StrategiesResources

  • Resources must be readily available


Media plus strategies resources1

Planning

Media Plus StrategiesResources


Coalition examples

Planning

Coalition Examples


Media plus strategies information education

Planning

Media Plus StrategiesInformation / Education

  • l


Media plus strategies information and education

Planning

Planning

Media Plus StrategiesInformation and Education

  • Topics can be about risky behavior, survey data, the law, etc.

Colorado

Laws


Media plus strategies information and education1

Media Plus StrategiesInformation and Education


Your blueprint and levels of evidence

Your Blueprint and levels of Evidence

  • Conduct a Literature Review

  • Identify local experts

  • Work with your CAPT

  • CSAP levels of Evidence Guidance


Step 4 pre testing

Planning

Step 4: Pre-Testing

  • Piloting alternate versions of your message

  • Do this with each market segment

  • Revise your messages, resources and service referrals needed

Northeast Region


Why and when to pretest

Why and When to PreTest

  • Pretests can:

    • Provide insights into whether materials or channels are appropriate or acceptable to the intended audience. Reveals whether a message, material or channel is culturally acceptable.

  • Pretests cannot: Guarantee success.

    • Thus, audience input is important throughout the development of a communication program.


Why and when to pretest1

Why and When to PreTest

Pretesting should occur during:

  • concept development: to determine current behaviors of the intended audience in order to develop concepts.

  • planning and strategy selection: to evaluate the acceptability of messages, visuals, and strategies.

  • draft review: to determine the appropriateness of the draft materials, outline, or program strategy after "concept" is accepted.

  • comparison: to decide among several options for materials, visuals, narrative or strategies.

  • final development: to test the near-complete product before extensive printing or distribution occurs; mock-up versions may be used.

    Adapted from Beyond the Brochure: Alternative Approaches to Effective Health Communication, AMC Cancer Research Center and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Denver, CO, 1993.


Step 4 pre testing1

Planning

Step 4: Pre-Testing

  • Pre-testing Research - Before

  • Monitoring Research – Throughout the implementation

  • Evaluation Research - After

Northeast Region


Step 4 pre testing methods

Planning

Step 4: Pre-TestingMethods

  • Self-Administered Questionnaires

  • Central Location Intercept Interviews

  • Theater Testing

  • Focus Group Interviews

  • Readability Testing

  • Gatekeeper Review

Northeast Region


Step 4 pre testing criteria for selection

Planning

Step 4: Pre-TestingCriteria For Selection

  • Materials format

  • Complexity of materials

  • Degree of sensitivity or controversy

  • Previous experience and knowledge

    • More complex pretests conducted incorrectly are useless.

  • Resources--Pretest methods can vary enormously in cost

  • Pretest questions

  • Combinations of methods - Using a variety of activities allows you to get the maximum amount of input from respondents.

Northeast Region


Pitfalls of pretesting

Pitfalls of PreTesting

  • Testing too late in the production stage often yields expensive revisions.

  • Being unprepared to make changes after getting the test results.

  • Using an untrained moderator or interviewer to conduct the group often yields unusable data.

  • Testing the message with too limited an audience.

  • Testing the message with the wrong audience.

  • Asking the wrong questions can lead to a lot of interesting data that doesn't help you refine your plans or message

  • Misinterpreting group responses can lead to faulty data.


Step 5 develop and implement

Implementation

Step 5: Develop and Implement

  • Develop needed materials

  • Implement the campaign

Northeast Region


Social marketing power point

Implementation

Key Principles of the SPF

  • Based on a public health approach.

  • Focused on outcomes-based prevention.

  • Widens the scope to population-based prevention.

  • Follows a strategic planning process using epidemiological data throughout the process to drive decision making.


Denominator

Implementation

Denominator

  • denominator (dĭ-nŏm'ə-nā'tər)   The number below or to the right of the line in a fraction, indicating the number of equal parts into which one whole is divided. For example, in the fraction 2/7 , 7 is the denominator.


Denominator1

Implementation

Denominator

  • The number of Compliance Checks by the number of licensees in your town

  • The number of Safe Homes Pledges by the Number of Families with teenage children at home

  • The number of 7th graders participating in Life-skills by the number of 7th graders in the community.


Reach and mix

Implementation

Reach and Mix

  • To what extent is the strategy reaching the target population

  • Is there an adequate strategic mix


Alignment

Implementation

Alignment

  • Developing a theory of change and identify the strategies currently implemented, their measured or expected outcomes, and their relationship to the long term behavior change.

  • Is the logic model consistent with the theory of change?


Midcourse corrections youth access to alcohol social vs commercial

Implementation

Midcourse Corrections ?Youth Access to Alcohol (social vs. commercial)

  • In 2005, ABC coalition was spending 85 % of their resources ( fiscal, technical, human) on commercial access strategies and 15 % on social access

  • 2004 -2006 Data showed a drop of primary source of alcohol (bars, package stores) from 15% among juniors and seniors to 9%

  • Q. 34 There are many different

  • ways to get beer, wine coolers, wine or liquor.

  • Which of the following are how you get alcohol?

  • I buy it from a super market or convenience store

  • I buy it from a liquor store or package store

  • I buy it from bars or clubs or restaurants

  • I have someone else buy it for me

  • I get it through my friends

  • I get it at home

  • I get it at parties

  • 2006 six data showed an increase in social access (parents and young adults who purchase) from 32% to 43 %

  • Any Midcourse Adjustments ?


Step 6 monitor throughout implementation

Implementation

Step 6: Monitor throughout implementation

  • Monitor the customers response to the campaign

  • Revise as needed

Northeast Region


Step 6 monitor throughout implementation1

Implementation

Step 6: Monitor throughout implementation

  • You will need to collect data to determine whether your message is having an impact. Data collection might involve conducting more focus groups, administering surveys, or doing telephone interviews.

  • Your data collection methods should be dictated not only by cost, but also by the questions you want answered and the kind of information you want to collect. Whenever possible, work with an evaluator to design and implement your data collection efforts.

Northeast Region


Step 6 monitor throughout implementation2

Implementation

Step 6: Monitor throughout implementation

  • Even the best-researched campaign often needs some tweaking once it has been launched. Use the data you collect to refine and adjust your message, your communication channels, and your promotion strategies. If something isn’t working, a small alteration is often enough to improve it significantly. If you're not sure what to do, go back to your target audience and ask them what they think.

Northeast Region


Midcourse corrections youth access to alcohol from 21 25 purchasers

Implementation

Midcourse Corrections ?Youth Access to Alcohol from 21-25 Purchasers

Implement Shoulder Tap

Increased Enforcement

Decreased Social Access to Alcohol

Decrease in Alcohol Use

Long-term Outcome Data

_______

Ever Tried Alcohol

2005 - 32%

2007 - 32%

Middle School YRBS

2005 and 2007

Intermediate Outcome Data

_______

Middle School Youth

Primary Source of Alcohol

Friends

2005 – 23%

2007 – 24%

Middle School YRBS

2005 and 2007

Process Data

_______

Total of 8

Shoulder Taps Resulted in

7 people Agreeing to Purchase

7 Warnings

No Arrests

One Newspaper Story

What, how many, how often?

_______

Conduct Shoulder Tap with

4 / 47

Package Stores

1 X a Year

_______


Midcourse corrections youth access to alcohol from home

Implementation

Midcourse Corrections ?Youth Access to Alcohol from Home

Educate Parents on Social Host

Increased Family Policy

Decreased Social Access to Alcohol

Decrease in Alcohol Use

Long-term Outcome Data

_______

Ever Tried Alcohol

2005 - 32%

2007 - 24%

Middle School YRBS

2005 and 2007

Intermediate Outcome Data

_______

Middle School Youth

Primary Source of Alcohol

House / Parent

2005 – 23%

2007 – 17%

Middle School YRBS

2005 and 2007

Process Data

_______

As a result of seeing

Talk to Your Kids About Not Drinking

did you talk to your kids about not drinking

Yes – 61%

Parent Survey 2007

What, how many, how often?

_______

2000 Tip Sheets, 4 Billboards, and 250 Posters

_______

Saw the

Talk to Your Kids About Not Drinking

Billboard, Tip Sheet or Poster?

Yes - 39 %

Parent Survey 2007


Activity evaluation what adjustments

Evaluation

Activity: EvaluationWhat adjustments?


Activity watertown campaign poll 20 minutes

ActivityWatertown Campaign Poll – 20 Minutes

  • Read the Results

  • Identify if the message is being seen - Where

  • Is it impacting behavior- What

  • What changes to the campaign would you make after learning these answers?


Identifying best practices

Identifying Best Practices

  • A Short Course in Social Marketing

  • Case Studies, Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, CDC (USA)

  • Social Marketing and Public Health--Lessons from the Field, A Guide to Social Marketing

  • Social Marketing Institute

  • Social Marketing OPC

    • The Health Communication Unit

    • Health communication campaign project plans

  • THCU Literature Searches

  • The Social Marketing Network

  • The Social Marketing Toolkit - a self-learning module and evaluation

  • Toolkit: Implement a Social Marketing Effort

  • Weinreich Communications Social Marketing

  • Why Bad Ads Happen to Good Causes: and How to Ensure They Won't Happen to Yours A guide for creating more effective public interest print advertising featuring new data from an unprecedented 10-year study by RoperASW. 2002


Step 7 evaluation identify evidence of message effectiveness

Evaluation

Step 7: EvaluationIdentify evidence of message effectiveness

  • Observable success indicators

  • Measurable outcomes

  • Follow-up Studies, Focus Groups, Surveys, etc.

Northeast Region


Step 7 evaluation

Evaluation

Step 7: Evaluation

When deciding on outcomes, make sure to:

  • Identify realistic outcomes

  • Make the outcome specific

  • Have at least one measure for each outcome

  • Long term outcomes supported with archival data

    • Alcohol-related problems, rates of crash or injury, outlet density, alcohol availability to youth at special events

Northeast Region


Step 7 evaluation1

Evaluation

Step 7: Evaluation

When measuring community change:

  • New or significantly modified programs, policies, practices

  • Utilize a community change event log”

Northeast Region


Choosing an evaluation design

Evaluation

Choosing an Evaluation Design

  • Quantitative methodsanswer who, what, where, and how much.

  • Qualitative methods answer why and how and usually involve talking to or observing people.


Step 7 evaluation reporting findings

Evaluation

Step 7: Evaluation : Reporting Findings

  • Creating a report is a helpful way to organize the information you have collected so that you can share it with others and garner support for future efforts.

  • In your report, you will want to present the change you hoped to see, campaign accomplishments, broad lessons learned, and remaining tasks or recommendations for follow-up. Try to be concise, avoid jargon, and present a balanced set of findings.

Northeast Region


Evaluation support

Evaluation

Evaluation Support

http://www.rand.org/pubs/technical_reports/2007/RAND_TR403.pdf


What about fidelity

What About Fidelity ?

  • Blueprint walkthrough

  • Rubric – A guide and tool

  • Literature Searches

    • http://www.thcu.ca/infoandresources/LitReviews.htm


Questions

Questions


Social marketing institute

Social Marketing Institute

  • AMA's Marketing Resource Online

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • The Communication Initiative

  • Community Tool Box

  • Fostering Sustainable Behavior

  • Global Business for Social Responsibility Resource Center

  • Helping.Org

  • Outcome Measurement Resource Network (United Way)

  • Points of Light Foundation

  • Population Services International

  • Public Health Foundation's Online Learning Resource Center

  • Richardson, Myers & Donofrio

  • Tools of Change: Proven Methods for Promoting Health and Environmental Citizenship

  • Weinrich Communications

  • National Center on Nonprofit Enterprise

  • http://www.agoodmanonline.com/bad_ads_good_causes/index.html


Writing the plan

Writing The Plan


A comprehensive plan

A Comprehensive Plan

  • Use a complementary, reinforcing mix of television, radio, print, and outdoor advertising

  • Maximize use of existing high-quality media materials

  • Include grassroots promotions, local media advocacy, event sponsorships, and other community tie-ins

  • Utilize branding


Contact information

Contact Information

Chuck Klevgaard

Chuck.klevgaard@state.ma.us

773 750-7697


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