Geometry scavenger hunt
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 42

Geometry Scavenger Hunt PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 97 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Geometry Scavenger Hunt . Sindy Garcia Maria Milan Estella Montoya Vanessa Cruz . POINT. Man–Made: The tip of knife is an example of a man-made point. . Natural: A pine needle is an example of a natural point. Textbook: .

Download Presentation

Geometry Scavenger Hunt

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Geometry scavenger hunt

Geometry Scavenger Hunt

Sindy Garcia Maria MilanEstella MontoyaVanessa Cruz


Point

POINT

  • Man–Made: The tip of knife is an example of a man-made point.

  • Natural: A pine needle is an example of a natural point.

  • Textbook:

A point is an exact location of something, with no area, volume or length.


Geometry scavenger hunt

LINE

  • Natural: The red line shows how grass can be an example of a line.

  • Man–Made: The electrical cables around the city are examples of lines!

  • Textbook:

A straight path that goes in two directions without end!


Line segment

LINE SEGMENT

  • Man–Made: The metal bars in a prison cell are examples of a line segment.

  • Natural: This plant shows a representation of a line segment with the leaves.

  • Textbook:

A straight path that has two endpoints.


Geometry scavenger hunt

RAY

  • Man–Made: The shadow created by an electrical pole represents a ray.

  • Natural: This picture illustrates the rays of the sun cutting through the forest.

  • Textbook:

A two dimensional figure that has one endpoint and goes on forever in one direction.


Parallel lines

PARALLEL LINES

  • Natural: The lines in this mountain are parallel lines.

  • Man–Made: Wood balusters or spindles are examples of parallel lines.

  • Textbook:

Parallel lines are lines that never ever intersect!


Intersecting lines

INTERSECTING LINES

  • Man–Made: The traffic signs is representing two intersecting lines.

  • Natural: The trees in this pictures are making an intersecting line.

  • Textbook:

Lines that meet or cross at a common point.


Transversal

TRANSVERSAL

  • Man–Made: This window shows an example of a man-made transversal.

  • Natural: This leaf shows a line cutting through making a transversal.

  • Textbook:

Is a line cutting across parallel lines


Parallel lines cut by a perpendicular transversal

PARALLEL LINES CUT BY A PERPENDICULAR TRANSVERSAL

  • Man–Made: The back of this sign shows an example of parallel lines cut by a perpendicular.

  • Natural: This sedimentary rocks are an example of parallel lines intersected by another line.

  • Textbook:

Parallel lines which do not intersect but have a line intersecting them at a right angle.


Parallel lines cut by a non perpendicular transversal

PARALLEL LINES CUT BY ANON-PERPENDICULAR TRANSVERSAL

  • Man – made:

  • Natural:

  • Textbook:

A transversal line intersecting a system of other lines, creating acute and obtuse angles.


Plane

PLANE

  • Natural: The branch of a tree is a natural example of a plane.

  • Man–Made: The top of a table makes a man-made plane.

  • Textbook:

A plane is a flat surface that stretches off into infinity.


Triangle

TRIANGLE

  • Man–Made: The roof of the sign of a subdivision makes the shape of a triangle as a man-made example.

  • Natural: The pine trees in Denver are examples of triangles.

  • Textbook:

A triangle is a figure with three sides and three angles


Rectangle

RECTANGLE

  • Man–Made: Sindy’s bag for cosmetics is an example of a rectangle

  • Natural: The mountains at Red Rocks Park in Denver show the rocks in form of rectangles.

  • Textbook:

A rectangle is a four sided figure whose opposite sides are congruent.


Square

SQUARE

  • Man–Made: The side of a box represent the square face.

  • Natural: One little piece f corn has the shape of a square.

  • Textbook:

A two dimensional figure that has four equal sides and four square corners.


Quadrilateral

QUADRILATERAL

  • Natural: The mountains at Red Rocks Park in Denver show a quadrilateral figure

  • Man – made: The windows of the Colorado State capitol show an example of a quadrilateral figure

  • Textbook:

A figure with four sides.


Rhombus

RHOMBUS

  • Man–Made: A metal fence makes the shape of a rhombus.

  • Natural: This rock also has the natural shape of a rhombus.

  • Textbook:

A parallelogram with all four sides the same length.


Trapezoid

TRAPEZOID

  • Man–Made: This lighting post has the shape of a trapezoid.

  • Natural: A leaf can also have the natural shape of a trapezoid.

  • Textbook:

A quadrilateral with exactly one pair of parallel sides.


Pentagon

PENTAGON

  • Man–Made: The shape of this house illustrates a pentagon.

  • Natural: The top shell of this big turtles have different shapes of pentagons in a pattern.

  • Textbook:

A figure with five sides and five angles.


Hexagon

HEXAGON

  • Man–Made: This metal fence follows the pattern of an hexagon shape.

  • Natural: A beehive forms the shape of many little hexagons.

  • Textbook:

A figure with six sides and six angles.


Circle

CIRCLE

  • Textbook:

  • Man–Made: A plate illustrates an example of a circle.

  • Natural: This circular opening in the ground is probably the home of some animal.

A closed, curved two dimensional figure. All the points on the circle are the same distance from the center.


Radius circles

RADIUS (CIRCLES)

  • Man–Made: A street drain illustrates the radius of a circle.

  • Natural: By looking at Sindy’s eye we can see the radius of her pupil.

  • Textbook:

The radius is a line segment joining the center to any point on the circle.


Tangent

TANGENT

  • Man–Made: A battery on top of a table represents a tangent line.

  • Natural: A vine grapes can also represent a tangent line.

  • Textbook:

A tangent is tangent line is a straight line that touches a function at only one point.


Chord

CHORD

  • Man–Made: This sign shows a chord with a line across to keep out people from smoking in that area.

  • Natural: This cross section photo of a tree shows a line joining two points of the trunk.

  • Textbook:

A line segment joining two point on a circle.


Sphere

SPHERE

  • Textbook:

  • Man–Made: A basket ball is a good example of a sphere

  • Natural: An orange follows the shape of a sphere.

A three dimensional figure that has the shape of a round ball.


Geometry scavenger hunt

CONE

  • Man–Made: A traffic cone represents this figure.

  • Natural: A carrot is also an illustration of a cone.

  • Textbook:

A three dimensional figure whose base is a circle.


Ellipse

ELLIPSE

  • Man–Made: A wooden egg is an example of an ellipse.

  • Natural: This tulip is also an example of an ellipse, especially before it blooms.

  • Textbook:

An ellipse is a stretched out circle.


Geometry scavenger hunt

OVAL

  • Man–Made: A ceramic egg is an example of an oval.

  • Natural: An egg is an example of an oval.

  • Textbook:

An oval is any curve similar to an egg or an ellipse.


Prism

PRISM

  • Man–Made: This devise shows a rectangular prism.

  • Natural: This pinto bean represents a rectangular prism.

  • Textbook:

A three dimensional figure with two parallel congruent bases and rectangles for faces.


Cylinder

CYLINDER

  • Man–Made: This can of food represents a cylinder.

  • Natural: The bamboo trees in which the monkeys play, are a good example of a cylinder- both faces are circles.

  • Textbook:

A three dimensional figure with two faces that are circles.


Geometry scavenger hunt

CUBE

  • Textbook:

  • Natural: This zoom-in photo shows small tridimensional ice cubes

  • Man–made: This box shows an example of a cube

A three dimensional figure with six square sides of equal length.


Pyramid

PYRAMID

  • Man–made: I created this pile of rocks to demonstrate the shape of pyramid.

  • Natural: This tulip which is about to bloom shows the shape of a pyramid.

  • Textbook:

A three dimensional figure that is shaped by triangles on a base.


Fractal

FRACTAL

  • Natural: When looking at a tree trunk cross section, you can see the repetitive pattern of each layer of the tree.

  • Man–made: This drawing illustrates a repetitive pattern of the main shape; a triangle.

  • Textbook:

A shape that when is reduced it repeats on a pattern creating an exact copy of the whole shape.


Similar items

SIMILAR ITEMS

  • Textbook:

  • Man–Made: The gift bags are all similar items

  • Natural: This flowers are all the same kind so they follow the same shape.

Two figures that might have the same shape but different size.


Congruent items

CONGRUENT ITEMS

  • Textbook:

  • Man–Made: This two plates illustrate a man–made e example of congruent items.

  • Natural: This two tiny flower have the same shape and same size so they are congruent items!

Two figures that have the same shape and same size.


Parabola

PARABOLA

  • Man–Made: The monkey bars in a playground are a perfect example of a parabola!

  • Natural: The way that water comes out of a fountain creates the image of a parabola.

  • Textbook:

A parabola is the set of points in the plane that are halfway from a point (the focus) and a line.


Geometry scavenger hunt

ARC

  • Textbook:

  • Man–Made: The design of the Texas State capitol includes arcs in the front.

  • Natural: The leaves of this plant grow in the form of an arc.

An arc is a continuous portion of a curved line that is part of the circumference of a circle.


Angle

ANGLE

  • Man–Made: The two slides in a playground form an angle.

  • Natural: The dorsal fin of a shark is a natural example of an angle.

  • Textbook:

A figure formed by two rays with same endpoint.


Obtuse angle

OBTUSE ANGLE

  • Textbook:

  • Man–Made: The outside shape of the roof of my room has an obtuse angle.

  • Natural: The neck of a flamingo illustrates an obtuse angle

An angle measuring between 90 and 180 degrees.


Right angle

RIGHT ANGLE

  • Man–Made: The side window of a car illustrates a man-made right angle.

  • Natural: The neck of a giraffe and the body represent a right angle.

  • Textbook:

An angle formed by squared corners.


Acute angle

ACUTE ANGLE

  • Man–Made: The rim of a tire has examples of many acute angles.

  • Natural: This rock shows an example of an acute angle

  • Textbook:

An angle measuring between 0 and 90 degrees.


Pythagorean triple

PYTHAGOREAN TRIPLE

  • Man–Made: The decorative shapes of the Texas State capitol show an example of a right triangle.

  • Natural: The beak of toucan is an example of a right triangle.

  • Textbook:

This term applies to right triangles; give a right angle in which c is the length of the hypotenuse and a & b represent the lengths of the other two sides.


Textbook pictures courtesy of

Textbook pictures courtesy of

http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/geometry.htm


  • Login