Assistive technology
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Assistive Technology Assignment- A. Hughes PowerPoint PPT Presentation


The presentation informs the reader about the definition of assistive technology, examples of assistive technology, and laws supporting assistive technology in regards to individuals with disabilities.

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Assistive Technology Assignment- A. Hughes

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Assistive technology

Assistive Technology

Created by: Allison Hughes


Assistive technology assignment a hughes

Assistive technology is any type of equipment, device, product system, program, or service which aids in enhancing, increasing, or sustaining functional capabilities for any individual with disabilities (Disability Act of 1988).


Assistive technology assignment a hughes

The Laws Involving Assistive Technology

There are several laws and regulations, which have enhanced

individuals’ right to FAPE and employment when using technology.

Each have been briefly summarized.


Assistive technology assignment a hughes

The Laws Involving

Assistive Technology

Section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act- This section required the work

environment of individuals with disabilities to be equal to an average

employee. All federally and state funded facilities had to give equal

opportunity to individuals with any type of disability by hiring, training,

and promoting the workers(The Rehabilitation Act of 1973).

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973- (F.A.P.E.) This enactment

declared discrimination of individuals with disabilities to be illegal.

Based on section 504, individuals with disabilities had to be treated

and educated equally in federally funded schools and work

training programs(The Rehabilitation Act of 1973).


The laws involving assistive technology

The Laws Involving Assistive Technology

  • Section 505 of the Rehabilitation Act- Section 505 requires “the enforcement procedures for title V of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 505 (a) (1) provides that the procedures and rights in Section 717 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 shall be available with respect to any complaint under Section 501. Section 505 (a) (2) provides that the remedies, rights and procedures in title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 shall be available to any person alleging a violation of Section 504. Section 508 is also enforced through the procedures established in Section 505 (a) (2 ). (Section 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973)”

  • Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act- Section 508 (a) (1) establishes the right for individuals with disabilities to gain access and interact with data and information through technology comparable to individuals without disabilities. In addition to access, section 508 requires federal agencies to supply these individuals with the appropriate training, equipment, standards, evaluations, and assistances needed to perform and complete job assignments. If the agency may need to purchase or make available any resource for individuals with disabilities to become successful in the workforce (The Rehabilitation Act of 1973).


The laws involving assistive technology1

The Laws Involving Assistive Technology

  • Americans with Disability Act of 1990 (ADA)- The ADA provides individuals with disabilities with equal opportunities to employment, transportation, public accommodations, telecommunications, and state and local government agencies.

    • After the ADA act was signed in 1990, new construction started across the United States to ensure equal opportunities for individuals with disabilities. An example would be a sidewalk, wheelchair ramp, or elevator next to stairs

      .

    • Telephone companies now had to provide individuals who were hearing impaired devices to communicate.

    • Public services were required to create easy access to parks, trains, libraries, etc. to all individuals with disabilities.

(Americans with Disability Act of 1990)


The laws involving assistive technology2

The Laws Involving Assistive Technology

  • Section 255 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996- Section 255 mandates telecommunication manufacturers or service providers must make their equipment and services readily available and accessible to individuals with disabilities. If devices, equipment, or services are not readily achievable, the manufacturers or service providers must develop or make their products or services to be compatible for individuals with disabilities.


The laws involving assistive technology3

The Laws Involving Assistive Technology

  • The Assistive Technology Act of 1998 (The Tech Act)- The Tech Act supports programs of grants which provides individuals with disabilities access to assistive technology in order to perform, communicate, and live a life comparable to individuals without disabilities.


Assistive technology for the visually impaired

Assistive Technology for the Visually Impaired

  • Screen readers are only one example of a form of assistive technology for individuals who are visually impaired. Screen readers, also known as text readers, are text-to-speech devices or software, which allow people who are blind, have low vision, or other seeing disabilities comprehend various sources of text. Screen readers are perfect for the classroom in regards to individuals who are visually impaired. Students can use their voice to operate the device, such as turning on and off. The screen reader reads the information to the student.


Assistive technology for the hearing impaired

Assistive Technology for the Hearing Impaired

  • A Roger Pen is a digital pen which wirelessly connects to a receiver, such as a hearing aid, and transmits conversations. Using a Roger Pen in the classroom is ideal due to noise levels. Individuals with hearing aids have difficulty hearing conversations while other noises are created in the same room. The Roger Pen can capture conversations nearby and dull out background noises. The conversations are wirelessly sent to the individual’s hearing aid which allows the individual to hear to conversation without trying to discriminate between other sounds.


Assistive technology for the physically disabled

Assistive Technology for the Physically Disabled

  • Speech-to-text is a software which allows individuals to manipulate a keyboard by using one’s voice. Students with physical disabilities would benefit using speech-to-text when using written language. A student speaks into the microphone which is connected to a computer or handheld device. The device comprehends the speaker’s native language and translates the oral language into written (typed) language. Learners who have difficultly holding a pencil or typing on a traditional keyboard would be able to appropriately relay information in written format through speech-to-text.


Assistive technology for the learning disabled

Assistive Technology for the Learning Disabled

  • Talking calculators are devices which reads back equations to the individual using the assistive technology. In the classroom, talking calculators are beneficial in helping students listen to the problem typed into the calculator. Hearing the computer-based voice helps learners identify possible errors when punching in the problem such as number reversal or hitting the wrong operation. Children can listen to the equation, fix any input errors, and compute mathematical problems with the help of a talking calculator.


References

References

  • Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, Pub. L. No. 101-336, 104 Stat. 328 (1990).

  • ATL3. (2005). [Online image]. Retrieved March 24, 2015 from http://www.at4learning.com/index.html

  • Clarity Ensemble. (n.d.). [Online image]. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from http://www.harriscomm.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/c/l/cl-ensemble.jpg

  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. (n.d.) [Online image]. Retrieved March 24, 2015 from http://www.tn.gov/didd/ATClinic/AT_imges/IMG_5679.jpg

  • Rehabilitation Act of 1973. (n.d.). Retrieved March 26, 2015, from http://www.access-board.gov/the-board/laws/rehabilitation-act-of-1973

  • Section 505 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Pub. L.93-112, 87 Stat. 29 U.S.C. § section 701.

  • Section 508 Government Cloud. (2010). [Online image]. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from http://mspmentor.net/software-service-and-hardware-service/government-cloudcompliance-msps-must-master-section-508

  • Technology Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988, 29 U.S.C. § 2202 (West, 1988).

  • Telecommunications Act of 1996, Public Law 104-014,  110 U.S. Statutes at Large 56 (1996).

  • The Americans with Disability Act Logo. (1990). [Online image]. Retrieved March 27, 2015) from http://www.lvcil.org/ada.

  • The IRIS Center for Training Enhancements. (2010). Assistive technology: An overview. Retrieved on March 23, 2015 from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/at/#content

  • What’s Assistive Technology. (March 22, 2004) [Online image]. Retrieved March 24, 2015 from http://www.rehabtool.com/at.html


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