CIMIC
Download
1 / 39

SCOPE - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 308 Views
  • Updated On :

CIMIC ACTORS. Major General Michael G. Smith AO (Retd) Chief Executive Officer AUSTCARE HMAS Penguin 3 April 2006. SCOPE. What is CIMIC? Battlespace or Humanitarian Space? Who are the key CIMIC Actors? Can/how can militaries work with the UN & NGOs? Some CIMIC lessons from East Timor.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'SCOPE' - HarrisCezar


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Slide1 l.jpg

CIMICACTORS

Major General Michael G. Smith AO (Retd)

Chief Executive Officer

AUSTCARE

HMAS Penguin

3 April 2006


Scope l.jpg
SCOPE

  • What is CIMIC?

  • Battlespace or Humanitarian Space?

  • Who are the key CIMIC Actors?

  • Can/how can militaries work with the UN & NGOs?

  • Some CIMIC lessons from East Timor.


Resources l.jpg
Resources

  • Australian Defence Doctrine Publication 2004: Civil-Military Cooperation (Operations Series ADDP 3.11)

  • United Nations Standard Generic Training Module on Civil-Military Coordination

  • UK Joint Warfare Publication 3-50: The Military Contribution to Peace Support Operations (June 2004)

  • UK Interim Joint Warfare Publication 3-90: Civil Military Co-operation (Nov 2003)

  • InterAction DVD on CIMIC


Resources websites l.jpg
Resources/Websites

  • UN Inter-Agency Standing Committee

  • UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), Best Practices Unit – www.un.org

  • Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) of the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) – www.odi.org.uk

  • International Peace Academy (IPA) – www.ipa.org




Definitions l.jpg
Definitions

  • Civil-Military Affairs (CMA)

  • Civil-Military Cooperation (CIMIC)

  • Civil-Military Co-ordination (CM Cord)


Civil military affairs cma l.jpg
Civil-Military Affairs (CMA)

Cooperation

Coexistence

Competition

Conflict

At any point in any humanitarian emergency the relationship between any pair of civilian and military actors can be described in these terms. The potential for positive relations varies with objectives and conditions.


Adf definition of cimic l.jpg
ADF Definition of CIMIC

  • “the coordination and cooperation in support of the mission between the commander and civil actors, including the national population and local authorities, as well as international, national and non-government organisations and agencies.” (ADDP 3.11)

  • But, this defines CIMIC from a “military” perspective:what ifthe civil and military objectives are not aligned?


Cimic l.jpg
CIMIC

  • CIMIC is one form of CMA that is characterised by:

    • A relationship of mutual support.

    • An understanding of common objectives in complex peace operations and humanitarian emergencies.

    • Based on trust, respect, and separateness.

    • Exchange of information between military and civil actors.

    • Aided by joint planning.


Cm coord un ocha l.jpg
CM Coord – UN OCHA

  • “the essential dialogue and interaction between civilian and military actors in humanitarian emergencies necessary to protect and promote humanitarian principles, avoid competition, minimise inconsistency and when appropriate, pursue common goals.”

  • A shared responsibility.

  • A better reflection of the differences and realities between the military and civilian humanitarian actors.


Cimic works best when l.jpg
CIMIC works best when:

  • Security exists.

  • Civil authority predominates.

  • International legitimacy is apparent and unambiguous. (Non-belligerent occupation.)

  • The host-population is supportive.

    But such situations are rare!


2 battlespace or humanitarian space l.jpg
2. Battlespace or Humanitarian Space?

  • Civil and military endstates are not the same.

  • Military actions are driven by political objectives.

  • Humanitarian actions are - or should be - driven by concern for the civil population.

  • When human rights is a key political objective, potential for cooperation is highest.

  • If the population is or becomes a military target, cooperation is very difficult for humanitarian actors.


Military missions political conditions l.jpg

Mission

Conditions

Stable

Need for Security Increases

Unstable

Failed

State

Military Missions & Political Conditions

Availability and Impartiality of Forces Decrease

Peace

Enforce-ment

Peace-

building

Peace-

keeping

Combat

Need for Assistance Increases



Slide17 l.jpg

COMPLEX EMERGENCIES

(FAILING AND EMERGING

STATES)

JUSTICE

DEMOCRACY

PEACE

Human

Rights

DEVELOPMENT

GOVERNANCE

SECURITY

Resources

Financial


Cimic actors l.jpg
CIMIC Actors

Donors

Foreign Govts

UN + Agencies

Therefore…

…the military cannot work in isolation!

Foreign Military

NGOs

Local

Population

Host

Govt

Int Orgs

Religious

Groups

Business

Media

Competing Interests!

Cooperation or Chaos?


4 can militaries work with the un l.jpg
4. Can militaries work with the UN ?

  • Yes and No – and to varying degrees – but mainly Yes (if the UN is understood, resourced & is held accountable)

  • Which UN are we working with?

    • DPKO / DPA / OCHA / Agencies

  • Distinction between humanitarian (OCHA), peacemaking (DPA), and peacekeeping operations (DPKO), but sometimes they are merged – eg East Timor & Afghanistan


4 can militaries work with ngos l.jpg
4. Can militaries work with NGOs?

“ I am serious about making sure we have the best relationship with the NGOswho are such a force multiplier for us, such an important part of our combat team. We are all committed to the same, singular purpose to help every man and woman in need, who is hungry, who is without hope, to help every one of them fill a belly, get a roof over their heads, educate their children, have hope.”

Secretary of State Colin Powell to NGO Leaders,

26 October 2001


Can militaries work with ngos l.jpg
Can militaries work with NGOs?

  • Yes and No. It Depends.

  • NGO principles – humanity, neutrality, impartiality – are sacrosanct.

  • NGOs wary of “belligerent donors”.

  • NGOs must abide by their Codes of Conduct and will be held accountable.

  • NGOs are accountable to their beneficiaries, donors and Boards.

  • NGOs prefer the military to provide humanitarian assistance only in exceptional circumstances – avoid dependencies.


Understanding ngo principles l.jpg
Understanding NGO Principles

  • The Code of Conduct for International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and NGOs in Disaster Relief

  • SPHERE Charter and Minimum Humanitarian Standards

  • ACFID Code of Conduct (for Australian NGOs)

  • UN Guidelines on the Use of Military and Civil Defence Assets to Support United Nations Humanitarian Activities in Complex Emergencies

  • UN Guidelines on the Use of Military and Civil Defence Assets in Disaster Relief (Oslo Guidelines)

    But, never assume that all NGOs understand and follow these!


Best areas for civilian military co ordination cooperation l.jpg

Security

Logistics

Communications

Transportation

Information (selective)

PRIORITISATION

Best Areas for Civilian-Military Co-ordination/Cooperation


Core areas of ngo humanitarian assistance l.jpg

Grass roots poverty reduction

Restoration of livelihoods

Water & sanitation

Food & nutrition

Shelter & site planning

Health services

Micro-enterprise

Protection & human rights

Repatriation and resettlement

Peacebuilding and conflict prevention

Human rights advocacy

Core Areas of NGO Humanitarian Assistance


Potential areas of discord l.jpg
Potential Areas of Discord

  • Security is threatened

  • Military invades the Humanitarian Space

    • Lack of civilian authority

    • Dependency culture is created

  • Military denies assistance

  • Information gathering

  • Use of Language (eg. ‘humanitarian’, ‘impartiality’, ‘security’)


Working with works when l.jpg
Working “With” works when:

  • There is mutual understanding and willingness.

  • Relationship is based on trust, respect, and separateness.

  • Exchange of information does not compromise either party.

  • Joint planning occurs with some actors.

  • The CMOC, UNHOC and NGO Forum are able to network effectively.


Cimic guidelines l.jpg
CIMIC Guidelines

  • Mutual understanding – principles, codes, doctrine, sectors

  • Conduct more joint training

  • Civil Authority in charge as soon as possible

  • Share information without jeopardising security and impartiality

  • Military provide security and assist humanitarian agencies

  • Avoid public criticism – only encourages “spoilers”

  • NGOs – must be better organised

  • Military – make CIMIC a principle of peace and war



Slide29 l.jpg

Sep 99 – Feb 00

INTERFET

(Stabilization Force)

Jun – Oct 99

UNAMET

(Ballot)

May 02 – May 05

UNMISET

(Supporting Mission)

East Timor 1999 - 2005

Sep 99

V

i

o

l

e

n

c

e

Imposed

Stability

Aug 02

Durable

Peace

20 May 02

Independence

Self Sustaining

Peace??

Oct 99 – May 02

UNTAET

(Transitional Administration)

PEACEMAKING

PEACE ENFORCEMENT

PEACE BUILDING

PEACEKEEPING


Slide30 l.jpg

The Peacekeeping ‘Baker’s Dozen’

1. Speed of Action2. Planning, Leadership and Teamwork3. Legitimacy4. Strong and Achievable Mandate5. Host-Country Support6. International Commitment7. Capable Security Forces8. Separation of Combatants9. Effective Border Control10. Establishing the Rule of Law11. Managing War Crimes12. Responsive Budgets13. Capacity Building


Cimic lessons from east timor l.jpg
CIMIC LESSONS FROM EAST TIMOR

  • Centre of Gravity

    • Changed from being the “militia” to “earning the support of the ET people”.

    • This change transformed operations, and security improved.

  • Governance

    • Neither INTERFET nor the PKF properly understood the traditional system of governance. (See following slide.)

    • More anthropologists!


Setting levels of local leadership l.jpg
Setting: Levels of Local Leadership

District - 13 in total.

Posto (sub district) 62 in the country, 4-5 per

District

Suco (village) -500+in the country, 5-10 per Posto

Aldeia (hamlet) - 2000+ in the country, 4-6 per Suco


Slide33 l.jpg

3. Best human intelligence comes from CIMIC

  • Avoid a false division between intelligence and civil affairs staff – coordinate.

    4. Longevity

  • Leave CIMIC teams in location for as long as possible. Trust requires time.

    5. Language

  • Less important than trust, respect and integrity.

  • But, a good interpreter is essential.


Slide34 l.jpg

6. Listen and Learn

  • Military forces will leave.

  • Local population will trust those who listen to them.

    7. Sustainability

  • Avoid projects that cannot be sustained when the military depart. No dependencies!

    8. Opportunity Cost

  • Military should only do what civilian agencies and NGOs cannot.

  • Handover to civilian agencies asap.


Slide35 l.jpg

9. Force Protection

  • Enhanced by being close to the people.

  • Don’t become isolated from the community.

    10. IHL and Customs

  • Always respect local customs and traditions.

  • Know and apply IHL at all times.

    11. Media

  • Use primarily for the benefit of the local people, not to enhance your unit’s reputation at home.


Slide36 l.jpg

12. Cooperate with Civil Authorities

  • Do not control, except when security demands.

  • Influence and shape decisions by being part of the team – at all levels of governance.

  • Support police.

    13. Understand NGOs

  • Don’t jeopardise their integrity and security.

  • Respect their neutrality and impartiality

  • Protect their information.

  • Never assume that one NGO represents all NGOs.


Summary key messages l.jpg
Summary – Key Messages

  • CIMIC is a two-way street - the military is one of many actors

  • CIMIC is fundamental to all military operations

  • The best CIMIC is convergence between the “battlespace” and the “humanitarian space”

  • Effective CIMIC has the host population at the centre of gravity



Slide39 l.jpg

Donations: 1300 66 66 72 or

www.austcare.org.au

Email: [email protected]

Phone: (02) 9565 9111


ad