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Propositional and predicate logic Propositional and predicate logic At the end of this lecture you should be able to: distinguish between propositions and predicates ; utilize and construct truth tables for a number of logical connectives ;

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Propositional and predicate logic

At the end of this lecture you should be able to:

  • distinguish between propositions and predicates;

  • utilize and construct truth tables for a number of logical connectives;

  • determine whether two expressions are logically equivalent;

  • explain the difference between bound and unbound variables;

  • bind variables by substitution and by quantification.


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Propositions

In classical logic, propositions are statements that are either TRUE or FALSE…..








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In mathematics we often represent a proposition symbolically by a variable name such as Por Q.

P: I go shopping on Wednesdays

Q : 102.001 > 101.31


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Logical connectives..


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Negation

Negation is represented by the symbol ¬

if P is a proposition,

then not P is represented by: ¬P



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I do notlike dogs

¬P



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P

¬P

T

F

F

T


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The andoperator

And is represented by the symbol 





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The truth table for 'and'

P

Q

P Q

T

T

T

T

F

F

F

T

F

F

F

F


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The oroperator

The or operator is represented by the symbol 





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The truth table for ‘or'

P

Q

P Q

T

T

T

T

F

T

F

T

T

F

F

F


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The implicationoperator

Implication is represented by the symbol 




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If it is WednesdayI do the ironing

PQ


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The truth table for implication

P

Q

P  Q

T

T

T

T

F

F

F

T

T

F

F

T


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The equivalence operator

Equivalence is represented by the symbol .






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The truth table for equivalence coursework.

P

Q

P  Q

T

T

T

T

F

F

F

T

F

F

F

T


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Compound statements coursework.

P : Physics is easy

Q : Chemistry is interesting

¬PQ

“Physics is not easy and chemistry is interesting”


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Compound statements coursework.

P : Physics is easy

Q : Chemistry is interesting

¬(PQ)

“It is not true both that physics is easy and that chemistry is interesting.”


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Logical equivalence coursework.

Two compound propositions are said to be logically equivalent if identical results are obtained from constructing their truth tables;

This is denoted by the symbol .

For example

¬ ¬P P

P

¬P

¬¬P

T

F

T

F

T

F


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T coursework.

T

T

F

F

T

F

F

Logical equivalence : a demonstration

(P  Q)P Q

P

Q

P  Q

(P  Q)

P

Q

P Q

T

F

F

F

F

F

T

F

T

T

F

T

T

F

T

F

T

T

T

T


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T coursework.

F

Tautologies

A statement which is always true (that is, all the rows of the truth table evaluate totrue) is called a tautology.

For example, the following statement is a tautology:

P P

This can be seen from the truth table:

P

¬P

P P

F

T

T

T


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T coursework.

F

Contradictions

A statement which is always false (i.e. all rows of the truth table evaluate tofalse) is called a contradiction.

For example, the following statement is a contradiction:

P P

Again, this can be seen from the truth table:

P

¬P

P P

F

F

T

F


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Sets coursework.

A set is any well-defined, unordered, collection of objects;

For example we could refer to:

  • the set containing all the people who work in a particular office;

  • the set of whole numbers from 1 to 10;

  • the set of the days of the week;

  • the set of all the breeds of cat in the world.


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Representing sets coursework.

A = {s, d, f, h, k } B = {a, b, c, d, e, f}

the symbol  means "is an element of".

the statement "d is an element of A" is written: dA

the statement "p is not an element of A" is written: pA

Predicatelogicis a powerful way for us to reason about sets.


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Predicates coursework.

A predicate is a truth valued expression containing free variables;

These allow the expression to be evaluated by giving different values to the variables;

Once the variables are evaluated they are said to be bound.

Examples

C(x): x is a cat

Studies(x,y): x studies y

Prime(n): n is a prime number


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Binding Variables coursework.

There are two ways in which variables in predicates can be given values.

  • By substitution (giving a particular value to the variable)

  • By Quantification


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Substitution coursework.

C( x )

Studies( x , y )

Prime( x )

Simba ): Simba is a cat

Olawale, physics ): Olawale studies physics

3 ): 3 is a prime number


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Quantification coursework.

A quantifier is a mechanism for specifying an expression about a set of values;

There are three quantifiers that we can use, each with its own symbol:

The Universal Quantifier,

The Existential Quantifier

The Unique Existential Quantifier !


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The Universal Quantifier, coursework.

This quantifier enables a predicate to make a statement about all the elements in a particular set.;

For example:

If M(x) is the predicate x chases mice, we could write:

x Cats M(x)

this reads:

For all the x’s which are members of the set Cats, x chases mice

Or

All cats chase mice.


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The Existential Quantifier coursework.

In this case, a statement is made about whether or not at least one element of a set meets a particular criterion.

For example

if, P(n) is the predicate n is a prime number, we could write:

n P(n)

this reads:

There exists an n in the set of natural numbers such that n is a prime number

or

There exists at least one prime number in the set of natural numbers.


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The Unique Existential Quantifier coursework.!

This quantifier modifies a predicate to make a statement about whether or not precisely one element of a set meets a particular criterion.

For example

If G(x) is the predicate x is green, we could write

!x  Cats  G(x)

this would mean:

There is one and only one cat that is green.


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