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Ways to study and research urban, architectural and technical design. Prof.dr.ir. A.C.J.M. Eekhout Prof.dr.ir. T. M. de Jong Dr. D.J.M. van der Voordt. Ways to Study and Research urban, architectural and technical design. CONTENTS Introduction Naming and describing

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Ways to study and research urban architectural and technical design l.jpg

Ways to study and researchurban, architectural and technical design

Prof.dr.ir. A.C.J.M. Eekhout

Prof.dr.ir. T. M. de Jong

Dr. D.J.M. van der Voordt


Ways to study and research urban architectural and technical design2 l.jpg

Ways to Study and Researchurban, architectural and technical design

  • CONTENTS

  • Introduction

  • Naming and describing

  • Design research andtypology

  • Evaluating

  • Modelling

  • Programming and optimising

  • Technical Study

  • Design Study

  • Study by design

  • Epilogue

Empirical research

Studybydesign


Introduction l.jpg

CONTENTS

Introduction

A. Naming and describing

B.Design research and typology

C. Evaluating

D. Modelling

E. Programming and optimising

F.Technical study

G.Design Study

H.Study by design

Epilogue

Introduction

Preface (Fokkema)

  • Introduction (Jong; Voordt)

  • Languages (Dijkhuis)

  • Criteria for scientific research, study and design (Jong, Voordt)

‘Science equals any collection of statements that features a reliable relationship to reality, a valid mutual relationship and a critical potential with regard to other statements in the same domain.’


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Domains according to Van der Voordt


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Domains according De Jong


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art

Imaginable

design study

Extending science

empirical research


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Classical empirical research proposals

  • problem statement (problem isolation)

  • clear aim

  • reference

  • starting points

  • hypothesis

  • variables

  • data

  • method

  • content

  • publish


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Design related study

  • can not isolate problems from a coherent field of problems

  • brings aims together in a field of aims, a concept

  • has many references, not only written text but especially images: forms, types, models, concepts, programmes

  • has many starting points

  • has designs as hypothesis stating: “This will work”

  • has many context variables (“parameters”)

  • while the object still varies in your head

  • has many ways to study (in a book with 10 000 key words)

  • content grows drawing, calculating and writing

  • publishes with the medium as a message


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Design related study orempirical research

  • Research produces probabilities by causes

  • Design produces possibilities by conditions


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Design related Study

Preface by Rector Fokkema

Within the range of a technical university the object of design – in terms of (urban) architecture and technique – is the design subject that is amongst all others most sensitive to context.

The programme of requirements is not only derived from an economical and technical context, but also from contexts hailing from political, cultural, ecological en spatial considerations; on many levels of scale.


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The conceptofcontext


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Problems and aims


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Subtracting futures

  • Field of problems = Probable - Desirable

  • Field of Aims = Desirable - Probable


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Explicit future context

  • protects your study against judgements with other suppositions about the future context

  • raises the debate about the robustness of your study in different future contexts

  • makes your study comparable to other studies in comparable contexts

  • raises a ‘field of problems’ instead of an isolated ‘problem statement’ by subtracting desirable futures from the probable ones


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Explicit impacts within that context

  • indicate actors and specialists to join the team or take into account

  • imply a societal and personal relevance or fascination

  • imply a field of aims

  • imply actors willing to finance your study

  • could produce a programme of requirements

  • before you have a precise study proposal !


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1 OBJECT OF MY STUDY AND ITS CONTEXT

1.1. Object of my study

1.2. Probable future context: field of problems

1.3. Desired impacts of my study: field of aims

1.4. My designerly references: field of means

1.5. My portfolio and perspective: field of abilities


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Undesired, improbable possibilities

Are they relevant as long as nobody wants them?


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Unexpected inventions

Yes


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Changing desires


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Changing desires


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How to limitate, concentrate

  • give way to fascinations (motivated concentrations)

  • choose a scale (frame and grain) before an object

  • publish your portfolio evaluating it as field of abilities

  • decide to improve or to extend them in your proposal

  • publish images that fascinate you as a field of means

  • look at them as a professional: which concepts, types, models programmes could you harvest?

  • make your assumptions about the future explicit

  • imagine the impacts your study could have

  • cash your dreams


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Ways to Study and Researchurban, architectural and technical design

  • CONTENTS

  • Introduction

  • Naming and describing

  • Design research andtypology

  • Evaluating

  • Modelling

  • Programming and optimising

  • Technical Study

  • Design Study

  • Study by design

  • Epilogue

Empirical research

Studybydesign


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CONTENTS

Introduction

A. Naming and describing

B.Design research and typology

C. Evaluating

D. Modelling

E. Programming and optimising

F.Technical study

G.Design Study

H.Study by design

Epilogue

A. Naming anddescribing

  • Naming components and concepts (Jong; Rosemann)

  • Retrieval and reference (Jong; Voordt)

  • Descriptive research (Lans; Voordt)

  • Historical research (Macel)

  • Map study (Moens)

  • Casuistry resulting in laws (Hobma; Schutte)


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CONTENTS

Introduction

A. Naming and describing

B.Design research and typology

C. Evaluating

D. Modelling

E. Programming and optimising

F.Technical study

G.Design Study

H.Study by design

Epilogue

B. Design researchand typology

  • Design research (Jong; Duin)

  • Designerly enquiry (Breen)

  • Typological Research (Jong; Engel)

  • Concept and Type (Leupen)

  • Analysis of buildings (Molema)

  • Plan analysis (Meyer)

  • Design driven research (Breen)


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CONTENTS

Introduction

A. Naming and describing

B.Design research and typology

C. Evaluating

D. Modelling

E. Programming and optimising

F.Technical study

G.Design Study

H.Study by design

Epilogue

C.Evaluating

  • Ex post evaluation of buildings (Voordt; Wegen)

  • Ex ante research (Hulsbergen; Schaaf)

  • Ex ante performance evaluation of housing (Thomsen)

  • Evaluating prototypes

  • Comparing and evaluating drawings (De Jong)


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CONTENTS

Introduction

A. Naming and describing

B.Design research and typology

C. Evaluating

D. Modelling

E. Programming and optimising

F.Technical study

G.Design Study

H.Study by design

Epilogue

D. Modelling

  • Modelling reality (Klaasen)

  • Verbal Models (Jong)

  • Mathematical Models (Jong; Graaf)

  • Visualisation and architecture (Koutamanis)

  • The empirical cycle (Priemus)

  • Forecasting and Problem Spotting (Jong; Priemus)


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Example: Mathematical models

  • De Jong en De Graaf

  • Origins

  • The mathematical model is no reality

  • Mathematics is a language

  • Numbering

  • Counting

  • Values and variables

  • Combinatorics

  • Taming the combinatorial explosion

  • Program of a site

  • The resolution of a medium

  • The tolerance of production

  • Nominal size systems

  • Geometry

  • Graphs

  • Probability

  • Linear Programming (LP)

  • Matrix calculation

  • The Simplex method

  • Functions

  • Fractals

  • Differentiation

  • Integration

  • Differential equations

  • Systems modelling


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A mathematical model


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CONTENTS

Introduction

A. Naming and describing

B.Design research and typology

C. Evaluating

D. Modelling

E. Programming and optimising

F.Technical study

G.Design Study

H.Study by design

Epilogue

E. Programming and optimising

  • Urban Programming Research (Guyt; Hulsbergen)

  • Programming of buildings (Voordt; Wegen)

  • Programming Building Construction (Eekhout; Cuperus)

  • Designing a city hall (Weeber; Eldijk; Kan)

  • Design by optimisation (Loon)

  • Optimisation of performance requirements (Houben)

  • The environmental maximisation method (Duijvestein)


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CONTENTS

Introduction

A. Naming and describing

B.Design research and typology

C. Evaluating

D. Modelling

E. Programming and optimising

F.Technical study

G.Design Study

H.Study by design

Epilogue

F.Technical study

  • Re-design and renovation (Verhoef)

  • Study of Building Services and Installations (Schalkoort)

  • Methodical design of load-bearing constructions (Kamerling)

  • Classification and combination (Cuperus)

  • Methodology and component development (Eekhout)

  • Industrial design methods (Jager)

  • Future ICT developments (Sariyildiz; Stouffs; Ciftcioglu; Tuncer)


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CONTENTS

Introduction

A. Naming and describing

B.Design research and typology

C. Evaluating

D. Modelling

E. Programming and optimising

F.Technical study

G.Design Study

H.Study by design

Epilogue

G. Design study

  • Creating space of thought (Hertzberger)

  • Perceiving and conceiving (Hertzberger)

  • Formation of the image (Jong; Rosemann)

  • Experience, intuition and conception (Geuze; Eldijk; Kan)

  • Designing an office (Brouwer; Eldijk; Kan)

  • Designing a village (Heeling; Eldijk; Kan)

  • Urban design methods (Westrik)

  • Studying Design (Jong)

There are more design methods than designers.


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CONTENTS

Introduction

A. Naming and describing

B.Design research and typology

C. Evaluating

D. Modelling

E. Programming and optimising

F.Technical study

G.Design Study

H.Study by design

Epilogue

H. Study by design

  • Types of study by design (Voordt, Jong)

  • Designing Naturalis in a changing context (Verheijen; Eldijk; Kan)

  • Designing a building for art and culture (Röling; Eldijk; Kan)

  • Contemplations for Copenhagen (Bergh)

  • Learning from The Bridge project (Breen)

  • Creating non-orthogonal architecture (Vollers)

  • Design in Strategy (Frieling)


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Ways to Study and Researchurban, architectural and technical design

  • CONTENTS

  • Introduction

  • Naming and describing

  • Design research andtypology

  • Evaluating

  • Modelling

  • Programming and optimising

  • Technical Study

  • Design Study

  • Study by design

  • Epilogue

Empirical research

Studybydesign


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