The high school allotment rulemaking for high school completion and college readiness
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The High School Allotment: Rulemaking for High School Completion and College Readiness. Public Stakeholder Meeting July 20, 2006. Overall graduation rates are improving…. …however, disparities persist. Exit level disparities are troubling. College readiness is low for all groups .

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The High School Allotment: Rulemaking for High School Completion and College Readiness

Public Stakeholder Meeting

July 20, 2006


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Overall graduation rates are improving… Completion and College Readiness


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…however, disparities persist Completion and College Readiness


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Exit level disparities are troubling Completion and College Readiness


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College readiness is low for all groups Completion and College Readiness

Percent of Students Meeting THECB Standard for Higher Education Readiness (Preliminary 2006)


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Negative consequences are significant Completion and College Readiness

  • 56 percent of jobs today require some college.

  • 80 percent of the fastest-growing jobs over the next decade will require some college.

  • Of the 50 best-paying occupations, only 2 do not require a college degree.

  • A male with a college degree will make almost $1 million more over his lifetime than a high school dropout.

  • A woman with only a high school diploma earns a salary just above the poverty line for a family of three.


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What are the goals of the High School Allotment? Completion and College Readiness

Use strategies with evidence of effectiveness to

  • Prepare students who traditionally have not gone on to higher education for college- and university-level work

  • Encourage all students to take advanced academic course work that leads to college credit

  • Increase the rigor of academic course work for all students

  • Align secondary and postsecondary curriculum and expectations

  • Support promising high school completion and success initiatives in grades 6 through 12


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What is the High School Allotment? Completion and College Readiness

House Bill 1 adds

  • Section 42.2516 (b)(3) which provides an amount to districts equal to the product of $275 multiplied by the number of students in average daily attendance in grades 9 through 12 in the district

    • First payment will be in September 2006

    • Districts will receive payments over the course of the year according to their FSP payment schedule

    • An open-enrollment charter school is entitled to an allotment in the same manner as a school district

    • TEA will require a separate accounting for the high school allotment funds using locally defined special revenue codes 423 through 428


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How may districts use High School Allotment funds Completion and College Readiness?

  • Section 39.114 High School Allotment states that school districts and campuses must use funds under 42.2516 (b) (3) to:

    • Implement college readiness programs to prepare underachieving students for college

    • Implement programs that encourage students toward advanced academic opportunities, such as dual credit and AP

    • Implement programs that give students opportunities to take academically rigorous course work, including four years of math and science

    • Implement programs that align the curriculum for grades 6 through 12 with postsecondary curriculum

    • Implement other high school completion and success initiatives in grades 6 through 12 as approved by the commissioner


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Are there exceptions to uses of the High School Allotment Completion and College Readiness?

  • Beginning in the 2008-09 school year, Section 39.114 (b) allows a school district to use the high school allotment funds on any instructional program other than an athletic program if

    • The district is recognized as exceptional under the new academic accountability indicator that will measure progress toward preparation for postsecondary success (Section 39.051 (b) (13))

    • The district’s completion rate for grades 9 through 12 meets or exceeds completion rate standards required to achieve an exemplary rating (95% or more for 2007)


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What rulemaking will be involved Completion and College Readiness?

TEA will propose and adopt rules related to the following:

  • Permissible uses of funds allocated under the high school allotment

  • Standards for evaluating the success and cost-effectiveness of high school completion and success and college readiness programs

  • Guidance in establishing and improving high school completion and success and college readiness programs

  • Standards for selecting and recognizing school districts and campuses that offer exceptional high school completion and success and college readiness programs


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What is the timeline for the rulemaking process Completion and College Readiness?

Commissioner’s rules are published and adopted under a timeline that gives opportunity for stakeholder input and comments, and for TEA to incorporate comments.

Expedited timeline to publish proposed high school allotment rules before the start of the 2006-7 school year:

  • Stakeholder meetings/forums

    • TASSP—June 7-8

    • UT/TASA Summer Conference—June 26-27

    • Stakeholder meeting at TEA—TBD

  • Commissioner’s rules filed on August 7, 2006

  • Commissioner’s rules published on August 18, 2006

  • 30-day comment period ends in September 2006

  • Commissioner’s rules are effective at the end of October 2006


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What if districts need to begin planning before rules are proposed ?

TEA recognizes that district planning for the 2006-07 school year may begin before the proposed rules are published:

  • If districts/campuses implement programs before the proposed rules are published, districts should closely adhere to the language in Section 39.114.

  • Districts/campuses may fund effective high school completion and college readiness programs that have been successful and are already in place on the campus.


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Questions for Stakeholders proposed ?

  • What college readiness programs have been effective in your districts and campuses?

  • What advanced opportunities do you offer your students? How could you expand those opportunities with these funds?

  • What programs/activities are you implementing that ensure that all students succeed in four years of math and science?

  • What activities might you put in place to align 6-12 and postsecondary curriculum and expectations?


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Questions for Stakeholders proposed ?

  • What 6-12 programs/activities have you found to be effective in improving graduation rates and reducing dropout rates?

  • Are there high school completion or college readiness programs that are more cost-effective?

  • How would you suggest recognizing campuses and districts with exceptional programs? How should this knowledge be disseminated across the state?

  • What programs would you be able to implement with these funds that you are currently unable to fund?

  • What criteria should districts use to decide which programs to expand/continue?


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Contact Information proposed ?

For more information about the High School Allotment, please contact Christi Martin or Barbara Knaggs.

Christi Martin Barbara Knaggs

Senior Advisor Senior Director

Education Initiatives Secondary School Initiatives

Texas Education Agency Texas Education Agency

William B. Travis Building William B. Travis Building

1701 N. Congress Avenue 1701 N. Congress Avenue

Austin, TX 78701 Austin, TX 78701

(512) 936-6060 (512) 936-6060

[email protected] [email protected]

www.tea.state.tx.us/ed_init/thsp/


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