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Transitioning to Microsoft ® Office 2007 Training Get up to speed Course contents Have you heard about Office 2007? Word, Outlook, and PowerPoint Get to know the Ribbon Find everyday commands A new file format Course contents Microsoft ® Word 2007 Get to know the Ribbon

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Transitioning to Microsoft® Office 2007 Training

Get up to speed


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Course contents

  • Have you heard about Office 2007?

  • Word, Outlook, and PowerPoint

  • Get to know the Ribbon

  • Find everyday commands

  • A new file format

Get up to speed


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Course contents

  • Microsoft® Word 2007

Get up to speed


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Get to know the Ribbon

When you first open Word 2007, you may be surprised by its new look.

Most of the changes are in the Ribbon, the area that spans the top of Word.

The Ribbon brings the most popular commands to the forefront, so you don’t have to hunt in various parts of the program for things you do all the time.

Why the change? To make your work easier and faster.

Get up to speed


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What’s on the Ribbon?

Getting familiar with the three parts of the Ribbon will help you understand how to use it.

They are tabs, groups, and commands.

Tabs: The Ribbon has seven basic ones across the top. Each represents an activity area.

Groups: Each tab has several groups that show related items together.

Commands: A command is a button, a menu, or a box where you can enter information.

Get up to speed


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The Mini toolbar

Some formatting commands are so useful that you want them available no matter what you’re doing.

Let’s say you want to quickly format some text, but you’re working on the Page Layout tab.

You could click the Home tab to see the formatting options, but there’s a faster way.

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The Quick Access Toolbar

The Quick Access Toolbar is the small area to the upper left of the Ribbon.

It contains the things that you use over and over every day: Save, Undo, and Repeat.

Animation: Right-click, and click Play.

You can also add your favorite commands to the Quick Access Toolbar so that they’re available no matter which tab you’re on.

Get up to speed


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The Quick Access Toolbar

The Quick Access Toolbar is the small area to the upper left of the Ribbon.

It contains the things that you use over and over every day: Save, Undo, and Repeat.

The picture show how you can add your favorite other commands to the Quick Access Toolbar so that they’re available no matter which tab you’re on.

You can also remove buttons from the Quick Access Toolbar.

Get up to speed


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Start with the Microsoft Office Button

What happened to the File menu?

Press the Microsoft Office Button to find out.

The Microsoft Office Button is now the place to start in Word.

When you press it, a menu appears that you use to create, open, or save a document.

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A new file format

One more big change in the new version of Word: an improved file format.

What does that mean to you?

The new file format helps keep your file sizes smaller, and it helps keep them safer. There are other advantages, too.

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Why the change? XML

The new Word document file format is based on the new Office Open XML Formats.

The format brings lots of benefits:

  • Helps make your documents safer.

  • Helps make your document file sizes smaller.

  • Helps make your documents less susceptible to damage.

Get up to speed


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Course contents

  • Microsoft® Outlook 2007

Get up to speed


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Course contents

  • A new version of Outlook

  • What’s changed and why

  • Find everyday commands

  • Send and receive attachments and pictures

Get up to speed


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What’s changed and why

The first time you create a message in Outlook 2007 (or open one you receive), you’ll see the Ribbon.

It’s the band across the top of the window.

One of the most dramatic changes in Outlook, the Ribbon gives Outlook its new look.

But as you get up to speed, you’ll see that the change is more than visual—it’s there to help you get things done more easily and with fewer steps.

Get up to speed


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Find everyday commands

You’ve got Outlook 2007 installed and you’ve taken time to learn about some of the ways it differs from previous versions.

Now it’s time to get to work.

Will it be easy to do the things you’ve always done in Outlook?

This lesson will show you that the answer is yes.

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Create a new message

It’s time to write and send your first e-mail message using the new Outlook.

What do you need to know? For starters, some things haven’t changed.

The first thing you need to know to get started is that you don’t need to know anything new. All of the old ways to start a new message still work.

In a new message, first get oriented to the Ribbon. The Message tab is on top, with the commands you’re most likely to use every time you create and send a message.

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Use the Address Book to add recipients

Do you use the Address Book to add names to the To, Cc, and Bcc fields?

You’ll find the Address Book command on the Message tab.

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Show or hide the Bcc field

If you prefer to type e-mail addresses directly in the To and Cc boxes, you may also want to know how you can show the Bcc field so that you can type names there, too.

The picture shows the location of the Show Bcc command.

As you can see, you’ll find it on the Options tab.

Get up to speed


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Include your signature

Do you use a personal e-mail signature at the end of your Outlook messages?

The same signature you used in earlier versions will be available when you upgrade to Outlook 2007.

If you didn’t use signatures (maybe they seemed too complex or you could never remember how to create them or where to find them), you’ll be surprised to see how easy signatures are in Outlook 2007.

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Use flags and reminders

Flags and reminders can help you and others remember to do things.

To add a flag, reminder, or both when you’re creating a message, start by clicking Follow Up in the Options group of a new message.

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Respond to a message

E-mail isn’t just about sending…

…it’s also about receiving and replying.

When you reply from an open message, you’ll use the buttons in the Respond group on the Message tab of the Ribbon.

You’ll notice that what’s on the Ribbon in a received message is different from what’s on it for a new mail message.

Get up to speed


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Whoops! Need to recall a message?

You’ve just sent a message and realize a key detail is wrong.

(You wrote “bored” instead of “board” when discussing the results of the last board meeting.)

If you’re using Microsoft Exchange Server for your e-mail, you may be able to recall the message that you just sent.

If you act before a recipient reads the message, recalling it will allow you to send a corrected version to that person and avoid possible embarrassment.

Get up to speed


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Make time and remember to do things

Outlook isn’t just about e-mail.

It’s also about organizing your time, which you do in the calendar.

When you create or open an item in your calendar, you’ll see that the Ribbon shows groups and commands appropriate for helping you manage your time.

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Want to create a meeting? Invite others

An appointment is just for yourself.

When others are involved, create a meeting.

On the Appointment tab, click Invite Attendees.

A To button and box appear. Type names directly in the box or click the To button to add invitees by selecting from a list.

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Work with a contact

When you open or edit a contact, you’ll use the buttons in the Show group to show or hide more information about a contact.

For example, if you want to note the birthday or anniversary of a contact, click the Details button and then select the appropriate date next to Birthday or Anniversary.

Get up to speed


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Send and receive attachments and pictures

Sending and receiving attached files in Outlook 2007 is just as easy as it’s always been—and in some ways, even easier.

What’s easier?

When you receive attached pictures or Microsoft Office files, you’ll be able to use the Attachment Previewer to preview those attachments right in the Outlook Reading Pane.

And if you’re sending pictures, the Ribbon will help you send them just the way you want them.

Get up to speed


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Include an attachment

Including an attached document or picture with your message is easier than ever.

Just as you’ve always done, you’ll begin by creating a new message. Then you’ll use the Attach File command on the Ribbon.

Get up to speed


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Preview attachments before you open them

In Outlook 2007, you’ll receive attachments just as you did in earlier versions.

And now, some attached files can be previewed right from the Reading Pane.

Suppose someone sends you two Microsoft Office Visio® diagrams as attachments, but you only care about the one that shows the new training room in your building.

How could you quickly decide which file to open or save to your hard disk?

Get up to speed


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How others receive attachments that you send

When you use Outlook 2007, people will receive attached files that you send just as they always have.

What has changed is the file format used by some 2007 Office system programs.

Attachments that you send or receive may use this new format, which keeps file sizes smaller and helps keep files safer. Outlook fully supports sending and receiving files that use the new formats.

Get up to speed


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Course contents

  • Microsoft® PowerPoint 2007

Get up to speed


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Course contents

  • Introduction

  • Get your bearings—what’s changed and why

  • Get to work in PowerPoint

Get up to speed


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Introduction

When you first open PowerPoint 2007, you’ll see that the user interface has changed. A new structure is in place for PowerPoint commands.

This new design will help you more easily find and use the features you need and create great presentations.

This course will give you a head start with what’s changed and why. After learning what’s new, you won’t want to turn back.

Get up to speed


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Get your bearings—what’s changed and why

The most noticeable change in PowerPoint 2007 is at the top of the window.

Instead of menus and toolbars, there’s a tall band across the screen.

This band is called the Ribbon, and it contains many, very visual commands arranged into groups.

The Ribbon is now your control center for creating a presentation.

Get up to speed


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The Ribbon

Why revamp the old command system?

Because the new system better supports how you work in PowerPoint.

Research shows that people favor certain commands and tend to use them over and over.

So now those commands are the most prominent and visible—you don’t have to hunt for them on menus or toolbars that aren’t displayed.

Get up to speed


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The tabs: Devoted to the main tasks

The Ribbon is made up of several tabs—the Home tab and others.

Other tabs include Insert, Design, Animations, Slide Show, Review, and View.

The picture shows you the contents of three of them: Insert, Design, and Animations.

Get up to speed


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The Quick Access Toolbar

As you work on a presentation, you take some actions that are general or repetitive and that don’t have to do with a particular phase of the process.

For such things, use the Quick Access Toolbar. It’s the small group of buttons on the left, above the Ribbon.

It contains commands for these types of general actions, such as Save, Undo,and Repeat or Redo.

Get up to speed


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Changing views

You need to change your view often in PowerPoint, and you’ve always done it easily by using buttons.

That hasn’t changed.

The buttons for Normal, Slide Sorter, and Slide Show views are still there.

But now they’re part of a new toolbar that includes a zoom slider and a button that refits the slide to the window after you’ve zoomed in or out.

Get up to speed


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Get to work in PowerPoint

Ready to get to work?

Here’s a primer for doing what you’re used to doing when you create a presentation.

You’ll find out how to start a new presentation in PowerPoint 2007 and how to give your slides a background and set of colors.

You’ll also learn how to use the Ribbon tabs and tools to insert elements into the slides, style them as you want, and then set up the show and get ready to print.

Get up to speed


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Start a new presentation

New presentations begin with the Microsoft Office Button, located at the upper left of the window.

Here’s how to start.

Click the Microsoft Office Button .

Click New on the menu that opens.

Choose an option in the New Presentation window. You can start with a blank slide or base the presentation on a template or existing presentation.

Get up to speed


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Choose a theme

A theme supplies the look and feel of the presentation design.

Choose a theme for the presentation right at the start, so you can see how all your content will look.

The Design tab is the place to go for themes.

A gallery appears there under Themes. Each theme has a name, which shows in the ScreenTip.

Get up to speed


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Add slides, pick layouts

When you insert a slide, you can insert one that automatically applies a layout.

You can also choose a layout before you insert the slide.

To choose a layout before you insert a slide:

On the Home tab, click New Slide (below the slide icon). This displays the layout choices.

Click a layout to insert a slide with that layout.

Get up to speed


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Insert a picture

Time to insert a picture—a photo or piece of clip art, for example.

You can do so right from the slide, from within a content placeholder.

To insert a picture of your own, click the Insert Picture from File icon.

To insert a piece of clip art, click the Clip Art icon.

The picture will be positioned within the placeholder border.

Get up to speed


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Apply a simple animation

To apply a simple animation to your org chart, go to the Animations tab.

With the chart selected, click the arrow next to the Animate box to get the list of effects.

Select an option for making the org chart pieces appear on the slide.

As you point to an option, PowerPoint shows you a preview of the animation effect.

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Print, distribute, and set program options

Now it’s time to set options for previewing, printing, and distributing your presentation.

Start by clicking the Microsoft Office Button.

Then:

Point to Print to open Print Preview.

Click PowerPoint Options to change program-wide settings such as your default view or whether to turn spelling checker on or off.

Get up to speed


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PDTC: Grow With Us!

Presentation created by Don Blouin of University of Phoenix

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