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Secondary Transition and Compliance 2008 Objective To provide a brief overview of secondary transition requirements aligned with Florida’s 2007-2008 Self-Assessment for Exiting II, SPP 13 - Secondary Transition B (16)

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Secondary Transitionand Compliance

2008


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Objective

  • To provide a brief overview of secondary transition requirements aligned with Florida’s 2007-2008 Self-Assessment for Exiting II, SPP 13 - Secondary Transition B (16)

  • To provide answers to frequently asked questions related to secondary transition requirements


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Terminology

The acronym for Secondary Transition (ST) is used throughout these training materials to correspond with the requirements for ST 1 – ST 16 found in the Exceptional Student Education Compliance Self-Assessment: Processes and Procedures Manual, 2007-08, Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services, Florida Department of Education for Exiting II: SPP 13 – Secondary Transition B (16).


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ST-1Notice

  • The notice to the IEP team meeting included a statement that a purpose of the meeting was the consideration of postsecondary goals and transition services, that the student would be invited, and indicated any agency likely to provide or pay for services during the current year that would be invited.

    (34 CFR 300.322(b)(2); Rule 6A-6.03028(3)(b), FAC.)


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ST-1Notice – Ages 14 and 15

Contents of notice for the IEP meeting must indicate that

  • a purpose of the meeting will be the development of a statement of transition services needs

  • the student will be invited to attend


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ST-1Notice – Age 16 or Older…

Contents of notice for the IEP meeting must

  • indicate that a purpose of the meeting is the consideration of postsecondary goals and transition services for the student

  • indicate that the student will be invited to attend

  • identify any other agency that will be invited to send a representative to the meeting.


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ST-1…Notice – Age 16 or Older

  • Only those agencies that may provide or pay for needed transition services based on the individual student’s needs must be invited. (Consent is required in order for the LEA to invite agencies.)

  • Others may be invited at parent/district discretion.

  • The decision as whether to invite a particular agency to participate in an IEP meeting is left to the LEA and the parent.


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ST-2Student Invited

  • The student was invited to the IEP meeting.

    (34 CFR 300.321(b)(1); Rule 6A-6.03028(4)(h), FAC.)

    • Salutation on the notice that includes the student and the parent

      or

    • Separate notice to student indicating that the student will be invited to attend


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ST-3Student’s Strengths, Preferences, Interests…

  • The student’s strengths, preferences, and interests were taken into account. If the student was unable to attend the meeting, other steps were taken to ensure the student’s preferences and interests were considered.

    (34 CFR 300.43 and 300.321(b)(2); Rule 6A-6.03028(4)(h), FAC.)


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ST-3…Student’s Strengths, Preferences, Interests…

  • Strengths, preferences, interests of what the student wants in the areas of instruction, related services, community experiences, employment, and post-school adult living


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ST-3…Student’s Strengths, Preferences, Interests

  • If the student did not attend the meeting, evidence of student input through other methods (e.g., student or family conferences, interest inventories, career exploration activities, vocational interest and aptitude inventories, situational assessments, and input from other personnel associated with the student)


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ST-3Student’s Strengths, Preferences, Interests – Documentation

  • May be documented in the present levels of academic achievement and functional performance section(s) of the IEP or may be included as a separate item


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ST-4Students 14 and older

  • For students age 14 and older: the IEP contains a statement of the student’s desired post-school outcome; a statement of the student’s transition services needs that focuses on the student’s course of study is incorporated into applicable components of the IEP; and the IEP team considered the need for instruction in the area of self-determination.

    (Rule 6A-6.03028(7)(i), FAC.)


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ST-4Desired Post-School Outcome…

  • The desired post-school outcome statement is the student’s dream or vision for life after graduation and should consider post-school activities & address

    • employment

    • postsecondary education

    • living arrangements

    • community participation

    • recreation and leisure

    • social relationships


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ST-4…Desired Post-School Outcome

  • All components of the Transition IEP should lead to and support the desired post-school outcome statement.

    This statement is developed through a student-centered process and is not the same as the measurable postsecondary goal(s), although the two should be related.


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ST-4Transition Services Needs and Course(s) of Study

  • A statement of the student’s transition service needs that focuses on the student’s course of study, such as participation in advance placement courses or a career and technical education program, is incorporated into the Transition IEP.


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ST-4Self-Determination

  • Consideration of the need for instruction in self-determination must be addressed in the transition components, through goals, short-term objectives, benchmarks, or through services on the IEP.


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What Some Districts are Doing…

  • Example 1

    • Identifying the student’s priority educational need (e.g., self-advocacy skills, goal setting, decision making, etc.)

    • Developing relevant measurable annual goals in the Transition IEP to address the need


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…What Some Districts are Doing

  • Example 2

    • Adding a line to the Transition IEP to note how instruction will be provided and/or information disseminated

    • Including samples of the student’s completed activities (e.g., Standing Up for Me worksheets) in the student’s portfolio.

      Districts have flexibility in addressing self-determination within the Transition IEP.


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ST-5Diploma Selection

  • Beginning in eighth grade, or during the school year in which the student turns 14, whichever is sooner, the IEP must include a statement of whether the student is pursuing a course of study leading to a standard diploma or a special diploma.

    (Rule 6A-6.03028(7)(h), FAC.)


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ST-6Person Responsible for Agency Follow-up…

  • If an agency likely to provide or pay for services during the current year is involved, a team member or designeewas designated as responsible forfollow-up with the agency and the IEP team was reconvened to identify alternative strategies if the agency failed to provide services as indicated on the IEP.

    (34 CFR 300.324(c)(1); Rule 6A-6.03028(8)(d), FAC.)


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ST-6Person Responsible for Agency …Follow-up

  • Is there evidence that an IEP team member or designee was identified as responsible for follow-up?

  • Is there evidence that the IEP team was reconvened to identify alternative strategies if the agency has not provided required services?


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ST-7Transfer of Rights – Informed at age 17

  • The Transition IEP for a 17-year-old includes a statement that the student has been informed of the rights that will transfer at age 18.

    (34 CFR 300.320(c); 34 CFR 300.520(a)(1))

  • At least one year prior to the student’s 18th birthday, the student must be informed of the rights that will transfer.

    • Is there documentation on the IEP that the student has been informed?


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ST-8Transfer of Rights – Notice at age 18

  • A separate and distinct notice of the transfer of rights was provided closer to the time of the student’s 18th birthday.

    (34 CRF 300.320(c), 300.520(a)(1))

  • Closer to the time of the student’s 18th birthday there must be a separate and distinct noticeto the parent and student informing them of the transfer of rights.

    • Is there documentation/evidence that the student and parent were informed of the transfer of rights?


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ST-9Measurable Postsecondary Goal or Goals (Age 16 and older)

  • There is a measurable postsecondary goal or goals in the designated areas (i.e., education/training and employment; where appropriate, independent living).

    (34 CFR 300.320(b)(1))


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ST-9Measurable Postsecondary Goal or Goals (Age 16 and older)

  • Develop measurable postsecondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessment in the following areas:

    • education or training

    • employment

    • independent living (as needed).


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ST-9Education or Training

  • Education is defined as

    • enrollment in Adult General Education (e.g., Adult Basic Education, Adult High School Credit Program, Vocational Preparatory Instruction Program, or GED Testing Program)

    • enrollment in technical center (certificate program)

    • enrollment in community college (certificate program or two-year degree)

    • enrollment in college/university (four-year degree and higher).

      Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


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ST-9Education or Training

  • Training is defined as

    • employment training program [e.g., Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Job Corps, AmeriCorps, Individualized]

      • individualized means one-on-one training provided by the employer, an agency, or service provider

        Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


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ST-9Employment

  • Employment is defined as

    • Competitive

      • In the competitive labor market that is performed on a full or part-time basis in an integrated setting

      • Is compensated at or above the minimum wage

    • Supported

      • Competitive work in integrated work settings…for individuals with the most significant disabilities for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred; or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a significant disability…

        Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


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ST-9Independent Living (as needed)

  • Life skills in the following domains:

    • Leisure/Recreation

    • Maintain home and personal care

    • Community participation

      Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


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ST-9Measurable Postsecondary Goal or Goals (Age 16 and older)

  • A measurable postsecondary goal may address more than one of the designated areas, and must meet the following two requirements:

    • It must be measurable; you must be able to “count it” or observe it.

    • It must be intended to occur after the student graduates from school.


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ST-9Measurable Postsecondary Goal Examples…

  • Lisette

    • Education or Training

      • Within three years of graduation from high school, Lisette will complete the non-degree program at Montgomery County College (MCC).


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ST-9…Measurable Postsecondary Goal Examples…

  • Lisette

    • Employment

      • By January 2009, through the assistance of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and the staff of the non-degree program at MCC, Lisette will obtain part-time employment on campus at MCC that does not interfere with her program’s schedule.


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ST-9…Measurable Postsecondary Goal Examples

  • Lisette

    • Independent Living

      • Within one year of graduation from high school, Lisette will utilize public transportation, including the public bus and uptown trolley, to independently get to and from classes at MCC.


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Frequently Asked Questions

Measurable Postsecondary Goals


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Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • How are measurable postsecondary goals different than the desired post-school outcome statement?


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Frequently Asked Questions…Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • The desired post-school outcome statement is not the same as the measurable postsecondary goal, although the two should be related. The desired post-school outcome statement is a vision or “dream” of where the student wants to be post-school. It addresses employment, postsecondary education, living arrangements, community participation, recreation and leisure, and social relationships. The measurable postsecondary goals must address education or training, employment, and where appropriate, independent living. Postsecondary goals must be measurable, and they must be intended to occur after the student graduates from school.


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Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • Where on the IEP do I write the measurable postsecondary goals?


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Frequently Asked Questions …Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • The measurable postsecondary goals should be reflected after the desired post-school outcome statement. If the district’s IEP form does not include a specific place to write the measurable postsecondary goals, they may be included in the area designated for the desired post-school outcome statement.


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Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • Does the timeframe for a measurable postsecondary goal need to address when a student will start something, such as “enroll in a two-year community-college program,” or finish, such as “complete a two-year degree program?” Which constitutes best practice or is either okay?


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Frequently Asked Questions …Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • Districts have flexibility in the format they choose to use for measurable postsecondary goals.


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Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • Are short-term objectives or benchmarks needed for measurable postsecondary goals?


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Frequently Asked Questions …Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • No. Only measurable annual goals require short-term objectives or benchmarks.

    It is generally helpful to think of the measurable annual goals and transition services reflected in the IEP as “benchmarks” toward the measurable postsecondary goals.


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Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • How do we determine the student’s progress toward the measurable postsecondary goals?


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Frequently Asked Questions …Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • There is no requirement for reporting progress on measurable postsecondary goals.

  • If the student is making adequate yearly progress toward attaining his or her measurable annual goals and other transition services within the IEP, then the student should be making progress toward attaining his or her measurable postsecondary goals.


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Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • If a parent requests an Adult Day Training (ADT) program or sheltered workshop setting and services for his or her child, how do we address this in the measurable postsecondary goals?


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Frequently Asked Questions …Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • The IEP team should always consider the most inclusive postsecondary outcomes first.

  • Ultimately the decision rests with the IEP team, however, restrictive settings and programs should be a “last” consideration.


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Frequently Asked QuestionsMeasurable Postsecondary Goals…

  • For students going directly into employment who already know the skills needed to complete the job, what would measurable postsecondary goals for education or training, and employment look like? (For example, a student exits under Special Diploma Option 2 or a student who has been trained in a technical program as a tile layer.)


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Frequently Asked Questions …Measurable Postsecondary Goals

  • The measurable postsecondary goal for education or training would likely describe the type of training the employer would provide for this student.

  • The measurable postsecondary goal for employment would likely be related to maintaining the job and/or expanding the individual’s job duties and responsibilities.


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ST-10Measurable Postsecondary Goals based on Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment

  • The measurable postsecondary goals were based on age-appropriate assessment.

    (34 CFR 300.320(b)(1))


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ST-10Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment

“Transition assessment is the ongoing process of collecting data on the individual’s needs, preferences, and interests as they relate to the demands of current and future working, educational, living, and personal and social environments. Assessment data serve as the common thread in the transition process and form the basis for defining goals and services to be included in the Individualized Education Program.”

- Sitlington, Neubert, and Leconte (1997)


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ST-10Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment

  • Age-appropriate means activities, assessments, content, environments, instruction, and/or materials that reflect a student’s chronological age.

  • Age-appropriate assessments may necessitate adaptations to their administration for some students, so that meaningful data are obtained.

    Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


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Formal

Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test

College Entrance Test

PSAT, SAT, ACT, CPT

Transition Planning Inventory

Brigance

Life Centered Career Education (LCCE)

Florida Alternate Assessment

Other norm-referenced

Informal

Curriculum – Based/Teacher-Made Tests

Interest Inventories

Self-Determination

Situational

Questionnaires/Surveys/ Interviews

Checklists

ST-10Types of Assessment


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ST-10Transition Assessment

  • Transition assessment data should:

    • be obtained over time,

    • indicate strengths, preferences and interests,

    • consider present and future environments,

    • be conducted by way of multiple places/sources/persons,

    • be sensitive to cultural diversity…

      Adapted from NSTTAC, 2007


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ST-10Transition Assessment

  • Review the IEP and other available components of the student’s record to determine if information from age-appropriate transition assessments has been considered in developing measurable postsecondary goals. If so, determine whether the information applies to the area in question (i.e., education/training; employment; where appropriate, independent living).


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ST-10Transition Assessment Example…

  • Lisette (education/training, employment, and independent living)

    • From the Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance statement on the IEP: “Based on teacher observation notes, community-based task analysis checks, and information from the student, her parents, and her teachers collected through the Transition Planning Inventory and Making Action Plans (MAPS), Lisette is a rule-oriented, quiet young woman with strong skills and interests in employment in the service industry. Lisette learns best through observation and practical experience due to limited verbal and reading skills.


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ST-10…Transition Assessment Example

  • Lisette (education/training, employment, and independent living)

    • Lisette has participated in a curriculum with a functional-academic focus in which she has demonstrated strengths in independent living skills, such as self-care, home management, reading for success in the community, and community math skills, including time and calendar skills. Lisette has expressed an interest in and demonstrated success in the service industry, particularly in the area of food preparation. Lisette indicates that her family encourages her to do well in school and in her job experiences. Her family expresses interest in Lisette’s living outside of their home as she becomes more financially independent after high school.”


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Frequently Asked Questions

Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment


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Frequently Asked QuestionsAge-Appropriate Transition Assessment…

  • How and where do I document age-appropriate transition assessment in the IEP for compliance purposes?


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Frequently Asked Questions…Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment

  • There is flexibility in where transition assessment is addressed in the IEP. Transition assessment would most likely be cited as a source and reflected in the present levels of academic achievement and functional performance or the summary of assessments/evaluation data.


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Frequently Asked QuestionsAge-Appropriate Transition Assessment…

  • Which transition assessments require consent from parents?


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Frequently Asked Questions…Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment

  • Consent is only required if the purpose is for reevaluation.


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Frequently Asked QuestionsAge Appropriate Transition Assessment…

  • What is functional vocational evaluation?


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Frequently Asked Questions…Age Appropriate Transition Assessment

  • NSTTAC describes functional vocational evaluation as “an assessment process that provides information about job or career interests, aptitudes, and skills. Information may be gathered through situational assessment, observations or formal measures, and should be practical. The IEP team could use this information to refine services outlined in the IEP.”

    Source: Storms, J., O’Leary, E., & Williams, J. (2000). As cited in NSTTAC September, 2007 training materials.


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ST-11Annual Goal(s) or Short-term Objectives or Benchmarks

  • There is/are annual goal(s) or short-term objectives or benchmarks that reasonably enable the student to meet the postsecondary goals.

    (CFR 300.320(a)(2))

    Are goal(s) or short-term objectives or benchmarks included in the IEP that will help the student make progress toward the stated postsecondary goal(s)?


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ST-11Measurable Annual GoalsExamples…

  • Lisette (education/training)

    • Lisette will accurately record her personal information, including first and last name, date of birth, social security number, street address, city, state, zip code, age, and telephone number with 100 percent accuracy by April 2008.


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ST-11Measurable Annual Goals…Examples…

  • Lisette (employment)

    • Given a cell phone with pertinent telephone numbers programmed and weekly practice in school and community settings, Lisette will successfully call her supervisor to communicate important messages in five out of five role-play trials in school and community settings.


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ST-11Measurable Annual Goals…Examples

  • Lisette (independent living)

    • Given travel training situations, Lisette will demonstrate sitting quietly and refraining from talking to strangers while utilizing public transportation at least two times across three situations.


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ST-12Transition Services…

  • There are transition services on the IEP that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student to facilitate the student’s articulation from school to post-school.

    (34 CFR 300.320(b)(2))


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ST-12…Transition Services…

  • For the measurable postsecondary goals on the IEP, are one or more of the following addressed:

    • Instruction

    • Related service(s)

    • Community experience(s)

    • Employment

    • Post-school adult living

    • Daily living skills (if appropriate)

    • Functional vocational evaluation (if appropriate)


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ST-12…Transition Services…

  • Develop a statement of needed transition services/activities in each transition services activity area or “no services needed” statement(s)


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ST-12…Transition Services

  • Transition services may be addressed through

    • the development of measurable annual goals and short-term objectives or benchmarks

    • special education services

    • related services

    • program modifications/supports for school personnel

    • supplementary aids and services

      and/or

    • state- and district assessment accommodations/modifications


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ST-12Transition Services Example…

  • Lisette (instruction supports the postsecondary education/training and independent living goals)

    • Community safety skills instruction, including self-defense at the YMCA

    • Travel training instruction

    • Math instruction related to money usage and telling time on a variety of watches and clocks

    • Literacy instruction related to sight word identification


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ST-12…Transition Services Example…

  • Lisette (related service supports the postsecondary independent living goal)

    • Assistive technology services to increase the use of voice output device

    • Physical therapy to improve independent ambulation


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ST-12…Transition Services Example

  • Lisette (daily living skills support the postsecondary education/training and independent living goals)

    • Purchase a monthly bus pass

    • Apply safety skills in the community, particularly with regard to use of public transportation

    • Learn to choose a seat near the bus driver

    • Learn to use the pull cord to identify upcoming stop


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ST-13Course(s) of Study…

  • The transition services include course(s) of study that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school.

    (34 CFR 300.320(b)(2))


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ST-13…Course(s) of Study

  • Participation in advanced-placement courses

  • Participation in courses that provide community-based experiences to help the student acquire adult living and employment skills

    (e.g., description of instructional program and experiences)


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Frequently Asked QuestionsCourse of Study…

  • Is stating the diploma decision (e.g., the student will pursue a standard diploma) sufficient in addressing the course of study?


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Frequently Asked Questions…Course of Study

  • No. A statement of the diploma selection is not descriptive of the course of study. The course of study statement should describe the student’s course of study such as participation in advanced-placement courses for a student pursuing a standard diploma or participation in courses that provide community-based experiences to help the student acquire adult living and employment skills for a student pursuing a special diploma.


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ST-14 Agency Invited

  • If transition services are likely to be provided or paid for by another agency, a representative of the agency was invited to participate in the IEP.

    (34 CFR 300.321(b)(3))


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ST-15Consent to Invite

  • The district obtained consent from the parent or from the student whose rights have transferred prior to inviting to the IEP team meeting a representative of an agency likely to provide or pay for transition services.

    (34 CFR 300.321(b)(3))


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ST-16SPP – 13…

  • The IEP includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the postsecondary goals.

    (34 CFR 300.320(b))


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ST-16…SPP – 13

The culmination of all components of the IEP for a student who is 16 years old, or older, must reasonably enable the student to meet his or her postsecondary goals!


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Additional Items of Importance…

  • Graduation from high school with a standard diploma constitutes a change of placement & requires prior written notice.

    • Does not require reevaluation

      • Not a change in eligibility

      • Not dismissal from program


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…Additional Items of Importance

  • Summary of Performance (SOP)

    • Academic achievement and functional performance

    • Recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting postsecondary goals


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Summary of Performance (SOP)…

  • Required for students exiting school with a Standard Diploma or aging out of program

  • Recommended practice for all students exiting school (e.g., Special Diploma prior to age 22)


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…Summary of Performance (SOP)

  • Education or Training/Employment/Independent Living

  • Describes:

    • Accommodation needs

    • Assistive technology needs

    • Support needs

    • Academic and functional performance summary

      • Transition assessments

      • Report cards, grades, etc.


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Frequently Asked QuestionsSummary of Performance…

  • Are districts required to hold an “exiting IEP meeting” for students who are near graduation?


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Frequently Asked Questions…Summary of Performance

  • No. However, districts must complete a Summary of Performance (SOP) for students’ whose eligibility terminates due to graduation with a standard diploma or exceeding the age of eligibility.

    The Nationally Ratified Summary of Performance template suggests that the SOP is most useful when linked with the IEP process and the student has the opportunity to actively participate in the development of this document.


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Free and Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)

  • Students, age 18 through 21, who have not received a standard diploma may continue until their 22nd birthday, or at the discretion of the school district, through the semester or the end of the school year in which they turn 22.

  • Students who have exited school with any type of special diploma, certificate, GED (not under GED Exit Option) may re-enter at any time prior to their 22nd birthday.


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Recommended Training…

  • “What Everyone Needs to Know about Addressing Transition Services”

    • Offered as a Train-the-Trainer by the Career Development and Transition Project, The Transition Center at the University of Florida or as a teacher training by local FDLRS Associate Centers and/or District Transition Contacts who have been trained as trainers

    • www.thetransitioncenter.org


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…Recommended Training…

  • “Transition Assessment”

    • Offered by the Career Development and Transition Project, The Transition Center at the University of Florida (May be replicated by FDLRS Associate Centers or Districts)

    • www.thetransitioncenter.org


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…Recommended Training

  • PDA-ESE Transition Module

    • Offered as a quarterly online course by selected FDLRS Associate Centers (NOTE: Available through all FDLRS Associate Centers during the April 2008 quarter)

    • www.pda-ese.org


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For additional information contact:

Sheila Gritz, Program Specialist for Transition

Florida Department of Education, Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services

(850) 245-0478

Sheila.Gritz@fldoe.org

www.fldoe.org/ese


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