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4-H Foods & Nutrition Cindy Brison, MS RD, Extension Educator Amy Peterson, MS RD, Extension Educator 2006 State Fair 4-H Foods Superintendents 2006 Nebraska State Fair What’s New to You in 2006? Updated and revised Foods Judging Guide !

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2006 nebraska state fair

4-H Foods & NutritionCindy Brison, MS RD, Extension Educator Amy Peterson, MS RD, Extension Educator2006 State Fair 4-H Foods Superintendents

2006

Nebraska State Fair

what s new to you in 2006
What’s New to You in 2006?
  • Updated and revised Foods Judging Guide!
    • New Rules and Regulations for Food Preservation Projects
    • Guidelines for judging 4-H Foods Projects.
  • New Foods Projects at the Nebraska State Fair!

4-H Foods Judging Guide

rules about recipes
Rules about Recipes
  • New for 2006 is that all food preservation entries must include recipe and source of recipe.
  • All food preservation entries must have the canning method, processing time, and recipe.
slide5

Recipes need to be from an approved source, following safe processing methods, not “Famous Aunt Ida’s No Fail Green Beans. This might include University Extension publications, the USDA Canning Guide, or the Ball Blue Book.

this isn t your grandma s kitchen
This isn’t your grandma’s kitchen…

It’s important to make sure the 4-H’er uses current canning principles!

why 4 h food safety
Why 4-H Food Safety?
  • 4-H Food Projects must be designed and executed to reduce the potential for food borne illness.
  • Critical considerations:
    • Prevent introduction of pathogens during preparation
    • Prevention of pathogen growth after preparation
focusing on food safety
What causes food to be unsafe?

Microbiological hazards are considered the biggest risk to humans.

Microorganisms are important because:

loss of shelf life and product quality

major cause of food borne illness

Focusing on Food Safety

HAZARDS

Chemical

Physical

Biological

conditions for growth

F

A

T

Time

Food

Acidity

O

M

T

Temperature

Oxygen

Moisture

Conditions for Growth
what grows where
Bacteria, yeasts, and molds can grow on just about anything… but like carbohydrate and proteins.

Think about the foods that spoil the quickest…These are the ones we are concerned about.

What grows where?
is this food exhibit safe
Is this food exhibit safe?
  • Ask yourself these questions before you judge the exhibit:
    • Does this product require refrigeration?
    • Would you eat this product at room temperature?
    • Will this product hold up to it’s standard as it is evaluated by a judge or on display for the public?
4 h and food safety
4-H and Food Safety???
  • 4-H Foods Projects need to have food safety in mind.
  • Judges will not evaluate foods that they consider unsafe.
  • Safe food handling needs to be used to prepare foods that will survive in warm, humid situations.
purple ribbon rules
Canned Products are acceptedif canned according to Current USDA processing methods must be followed for all food preservation.

Standard canning jars must be used. Jelly glasses or half pint jars may be used for jellies and preserves.

Jams, preserves and marmalades, fruit, tomatoes and pickled vegetables MUST be processed in a boiling water bath.

Tomatoes may be processed by a boiling water bath or pressure canner.

All non-acid vegetables and meats must be processed in a pressure canner.

Purple Ribbon Rules
pie in the eye
Pie in the Eye….
  • Pecan and walnut pies are acceptable, if made from a traditional recipe using eggs, sugars, and no added water or milk. There is not enough moisture in this type of pie to support microbial growth.
  • Recipes that include added water or milk are NOT acceptable.
topping it off
Topping it Off…
  • Icings and frostings made with RAW eggs are not acceptable, however egg white rinses brushed on prior to baking are fine.
  • Cream cheese frostings are only acceptable if recipe has a ratio of 4 cups sugar per 8 ounces of cream cheese.
  • Whipped cream cheese frostings without powdered sugar are NOT acceptable.
slide17
Frostings made with meringue powder; or powdered sugar, milk, and flavorings; caramel rolls and pineapple upside down cake are acceptable. The high sugar content of the toppings will not support bacterial growth.
  • Cream cheese fillings or melted cheese toppings may result in an unsafe food product by judging time due to heat and humidity and will be disqualified.
leave these recipes at home
Leave these recipes at home
  • Breads containing ingredients that are normally refrigerated.
  • Cake or brownies baked in a jar.
  • Canned or preserved products from a questionable source.
  • Caramel corn or pies baked in a bag.
  • Custard or cream filled pies.
  • Flavored oils.
  • Fresh salsa.
slide19
Homemade egg noodles.
  • Jerky of any kind.
  • Meat filled pastries.
  • Raw egg in any uncooked product.
  • Sourdough or friendship bread products.
  • Sweet rolls with cottage cheese or egg toppings.
  • Vegetables marinated in oils or herbs.
guidelines for judging

Guidelines for Judging

Being a 4-H Judge for youth is an amazing and exciting responsibility.

It is one of the most attentive times for the 4-H’er and their parents and leaders throughout their 4-H experience. .

What you do and say may be more important than what everyone else has said and done during the year.

how to be a good judge
How to Be a Good Judge
  • Familiarize yourself with the food to be judged.
  • Be informed. Know basic recipes and preparation methods. A cake may have been made from a standard, or using a healthier adaption. How was it mixed? The recipe and the method of mixing can make a difference in the outcome of the product.
  • Be objective. You may be called upon to evaluate a food you dislike or a food prepared differently from your favorite way.
  • Be positive. Point out what is good! Suggest what could be done to improve it – as a learning experience, not as a criticism.
  • Explain why a product has been given a certain rating.
quality differences of foods
Quality Differences of Foods
  • What are we looking for?
    • Products that are appealing, characteristic, and representative of the genre of product

Food image courtesy of Judges Training 2005, Food Safety for 4-H Judging, Iowa State University Extension

evaluation of exhibits is based on
Evaluation of exhibits is based on:
  • APPEARANCE
  • AROMA
  • FLAVOR
  • TEXTURE/CONSISTENCY
  • TENDERNESS
  • TECHNIQUE

Food image courtesy of http://food.oregonstate.edu/ba.html

biscuits
Biscuits
  • Uniform size and shape
  • Lightly browned
  • Tender crumb
  • Creamy color
  • Good flavor
  • Fine, even holes
  • Not soggy or doughy

Food image courtesy of http://food.oregonstate.edu/ba.html

cookies
Cookies
  • Uniform size, shape, and color
  • Texture either soft or crisp
  • Even cells
  • Well blended ingredients
  • No surface grease or flour
  • Good flavor

Food image courtesy of http://food.oregonstate.edu/ba.html

muffins
Muffins
  • Uniform size and shape
  • Slightly rounded top
  • Pebbled surface
  • Well blended
  • Good flavor, with no off flavor from fat, leavening, flour, or nuts

Food images courtesy of Nebraska State 4-H

yeast rolls
Yeast Rolls
  • Golden brown crust, slightly darker on top than sides
  • Well proportioned, uniform shape
  • Evenly rounded top
  • Tender, elastic and moist texture
  • Thin cell walls
  • Medium grain, light for size
  • Pleasant aroma

Food images courtesy of Nebraska State 4-H

quick breads
Quick Breads
  • Well-proportioned shape
  • Evenly rounded, minimal crack
  • Even color with no surface grease or flour
  • Tender, with a slightly rough crust
  • Even grain with no tunnels
  • Moist and tender crumb, slightly sweet flavor

Food image courtesy of Judges Training 2005, Food Safety for 4-H Judging, Iowa State University Extension

slide29

Similar problems result in many types of baked goods. Look at the following examples of quick bread crisis and you will see how these changes in quality are visible in other baked goods as well.

slide30

Pronounced sinking of fruit

Food image courtesy of Judges Training 2005, Food Safety for 4-H Judging, Iowa State University Extension

slide31

Swirl is not evenly distributed and the product may have a doughy undercooked portion.

Food image courtesy of Judges Training 2005, Food Safety for 4-H Judging, Iowa State University Extension

slide32

This product was over filled, which can result in a burned or dried out bread.

Food image courtesy of Judges Training 2005, Food Safety for 4-H Judging, Iowa State University Extension

slide33

Note the discoloration caused by either too hot of an oven or placement too close to the bottom element of the oven or glass pan with too hot of oven. It is recommended to reduce oven temps by 25° when using a glass pan.

Food image courtesy of Judges Training 2005, Food Safety for 4-H Judging, Iowa State University Extension

slide34

These products are “peaked” meaning that they were over mixed.

Food image courtesy of Judges Training 2005, Food Safety for 4-H Judging, Iowa State University Extension

yeast breads
Yeast Breads
  • Golden brown crust with slightly darker top than sides
  • Evenly rounded
  • Tender, elastic texture
  • Slightly moist, not dry or doughy
  • Thin cell walls
  • Small holes, with light volume

Food images courtesy of Nebraska State 4-H

you can see the difference
You can SEE the difference!

Food image courtesy of Judges Training 2005, Food Safety for 4-H Judging, Iowa State University Extension

your nose knows what not to smell
Your nose knows….what NOT to smell….
  • Oily or rancid aroma
  • Overly yeasty or sour smell
  • Presence of added ingredients
  • Burnt

Food image courtesy of Judges Training 2005, Food Safety for 4-H Judging, Iowa State University Extension

other tasty additions to tasty tidbits
Other Tasty Additions to… TASTY TIDBITS
  • HEALTHY QUICK BAKED PRODUCT replaces the one layer cake.Baked good must be made with less sugar, fat or salt, or altered using a sugar or fat substitute. Include original recipe and altered recipe.
  • FOAM CAKES have been added. Foam cakes are cakes that have a high ratio of eggs to flour and fall into three categories: angel food cakes or meringues; sponge or jelly roll cakes; and chiffon cakes.
other tasty additions to foodworks
Other Tasty Additions To FOODWORKS
  • Double crusted fruit pies may be double crusted, crumbed, or lattice topped.
  • A specialty pastry category has been added. This might include pie tarts, puff pastry, phyllo doughs, scones, biscotti, choux, croissants, Danish, or strudels. Common characteristics would include a golden brown color and a tender, flaky crumb.
fast foods
Fast Foods!
  • Replaces the MEALS project, with some revised and new exhibits!
    • COFFEE CAKE
    • MICROWAVED PRODUCT
    • COST COMPARISON EXHIBIT
    • FOOD TECHNOLOGY EXHIBIT
    • FAST FOODS MENU PLANNING
    • FAST FOOD BAKED PRODUCT
slide42
COFFEE CAKE (any recipe or shape) At least 3/4 of baked product. May be exhibited in disposable pan. Include cost of making recipe and a menu for a complete meal where this recipe is served.
slide43
MICROWAVED PRODUCT(any recipe or shape) –At least ¾ of baked product or 4 muffins on a paper plate. May be baked in disposable pan. Include comparison of using a microwave to prepare a baked product and how that affected the time of preparation and quality of the product, and a menu for a complete meal where this recipe is served.
slide44
COST COMPARISON EXHIBIT Exhibit must include a food product made from scratch and a cost comparison with some form of commercial product (mix, frozen, deli, etc.) If 4-Her doesn\'t exhibit a food item in this class, it will be lowered a ribbon placing.
slide45
FOOD TECHNOLOGY EXHIBIT Exhibit must include a food product prepared using new technology as a non-traditional method. (i.e. bread baked in bread machine, cake baked in convection oven, baked product from microwave, etc.) Entry must include supporting information that discusses new method and how it compares with traditional method. If 4-H’er does not exhibit a food item in this class, it will be lowered a ribbon placing.
slide46
FAST FOODS MENU PLANNING 4-H’er develops exhibits that aid in menu planning. May be a menu plan that is developed for at least five meals, a recipe file, or a poster that is related to what is learned in the Fast Foods project. Consider creativity and neatness. Menu plan may be mounted on a 9” x 12” colored paper or poster board, or display in clear plastic binder. Refer to pages 16 – 19 and 60 – 63 in the Fast Foods Manual. Attach an evaluation found on page 64 for two or more of the menus you have prepared. Fast Foods Recipe File – Collection of 10 recipes from any source. Each recipe must accompany a complete menu in which the recipe is used. An additional 10 recipes may be added each year 4-H’er is in project, with year clearly marked on recipes. Display in recipe file or in a clear plastic binder.
slide47
FAST FOOD BAKED PRODUCT Use five to seven ingredients to make a “quick” baked product. May be any recipe. Prepackaged products may be used in recipe, ex. Refrigerated dinner roll, pre-made bread dough, etc. Display proper amount of food item (4 on a plate or ¾ or more of baked item). Supporting information must include experiences in making a fast food baked product.
youth in motion
Youth in Motion!
  • YOUTH IN MOTION POSTER, SCRAPBOOK, OR PHOTO DISPLAY
  • ACTIVITY BAG
  • YOUTH IN MOTION HEALTHY SNACK RECIPE FILE
  • EXERCISE INTERVIEW
  • HEALTHY SNACK
slide49
YOUTH IN MOTION POSTER, SCRAPBOOK, OR PHOTO DISPLAY about the 4-H’ers family or self involved in a physical activity or concept/lesson involving this project. This might contain pictures, captions, and/or reports about the physical activity the individual or family did as a result of taking this project.
slide50
ACTIVITY BAG A duffle bag or backpack that the 4-H’er packs so that they are always prepared to be active and make healthy food choices. May include proper workout attire, a healthy beverage or snack, a notebook or goal sheet, etc. Make sure all items are clearly labeled and an explanation of why it is included in the Activity Bag.
slide51
YOUTH IN MOTION HEALTHY SNACK RECIPE FILE - Collection of 10 recipes from any source. Each recipe must accompany a complete menu in which the recipe is used. An additional 10 recipes may be added each year 4-H’er is in project, with year clearly marked on recipes. Consider creativity and neatness. Display in recipe file or in a clear plastic binder.
slide52
EXERCISE INTERVIEW Interview someone in your life that you have chosen to be active with or someone that you admire that is physically active. Why do they enjoy their exercise program? What are their goals? Why do you admire them? Maximum of two pages, one sided write up of an interview with someone who has an active exercise program. Consider creativity and neatness. Mount on a 9" X 12" colored paper or poster board, or display in clear plastic binder. Include a picture of the person interviewed. (May be laminated to preserve exhibit.) Overall size of mounted exhibit should be no larger than 9 X 12 inches.
slide53
HEALTHY SNACK see ideas for non- perishable snacks on pg 36. Four cookies, bars, muffins, etc., on a paper plate.
slide54

The 4-H Foods Judging Guide is a great resource to let you know about most food items entered in the fair and what to look for as product standards.

Use it as a way to comment on things that turned out just right – and ways to make improvements.

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