Civic journalism
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Civic Journalism. The Role of Newspapers in Building Citizenship. Press Challenges. Profit pressures Internet Bad journalistic habits Government regulation. New Questions:. Who is a journalist? What is journalism?. New Trends:. Interactive journalism Participatory journalism

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Civic Journalism

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Civic journalism

Civic Journalism

The Role of Newspapers in Building Citizenship


Press challenges

Press Challenges

  • Profit pressures

  • Internet

  • Bad journalistic habits

  • Government regulation


New questions

New Questions:

  • Who is a journalist?

  • What is journalism?


New trends

New Trends:

  • Interactive journalism

  • Participatory journalism

  • Citizen journalism


Civic journalism1

Civic Journalism

  • Restore good habits

  • Build reader connections

  • Get better stories

  • Build better citizens


Journalism today

Journalism Today

  • Blurred lines

    • Reporting & Commentary

    • Entertainment & News

  • Difficulty “getting it right”

  • Serving elites vs. citizens

  • Out of touch with public

  • Commercial > sensational


Bad habits

Bad Habits

  • Act rushed

  • Hover with notebook

  • Ask loaded questions

  • Expect fast answers

  • Listen for quick quote

  • Show up only for problems

  • Corrupt behavior


Civic journalism aspirations

Civic JournalismAspirations

  • Retain watch dog

  • Abandon attack dog

  • Add guide dog


Civic election coverage

Civic Election Coverage

  • Avoid < horse race polls

  • Focus > voter issues

  • Frame > hiring decisions


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Charlotte

Observer


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Norfolk

Virginian-Pilot


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Philadelphia

Inquirer

Mayor’s Race


Pew center for civic journalism

Pew Center forCivic Journalism

  • Funded 120 projects

  • Tracked 650 projects

  • Trained 4,000 journalists

  • Awarded 30 Batten Awards

  • Interactive journalism


Read more

Read more:

www.pewcenter.org

www.j-lab.org


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Computer kiosks

> Community surveys


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Clickable

Maps


Tax calculators

Tax Calculators


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NHPR Budget Builder


Definition civic journalism

Definition:Civic Journalism

News that citizens need to:

  • Learn about issues, events

  • Make civic decisions

  • Participate in a democracy


Civic toolbox

Civic Toolbox

  • New definitions of “news”

  • New sources of news

  • New interactions with readers

  • Mental checklist


What is news

What is “News?”

Content audits: 1977 - 1997:

  • Government News < 38%

  • Entertainment News > 380%

  • Scandal News > 300 %


Civic techniques

Civic Techniques

  • DON’T:

    • Keep score

    • Focus on conflict

  • DO:

    • Cover solutions

    • Interview all stakeholders


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Savannah’s

Vision 2010


Civic attributes

Civic Attributes:

  • Entry points for citizen input - task force

  • Reported solutions

  • Build civic capacity

    • Action plan

    • Non-profit foundation


Civic response

Civic Response:

  • 1,100 reader calls

  • $200,000 donations

  • 50 tons food

  • 8,000 toys

  • Thousands volunteer hours


News as conflict

“News” as Conflict

Internal vs. External

  • Conflict in Values

  • Not Conflict of People


Civic mapping

Civic Mapping

  • List pre-conceived ideas

  • Diversify Sources

    • Catalysts

    • Connectors

  • Watch for stereotypes

  • Hold conversations not interviews

  • Define terms

  • Find master narratives


  • Learn more

    Learn more:

    www.pewcenter.org

    “A Journalists’s Toolbox”

    (4 videos)

    “Tapping Civic Life” booklet


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    Taking

    Back Our

    Neighborhoods


    Civic listening

    Civic Listening

    • Data Crunching

    • Community Poll

    • Citizen Advisors

    • Town Halls


    Charlotte s civic tools

    Charlotte’s Civic Tools

    • TV and radio partners

    • Neighborhood advisors

    • Town hall meetings

    • Success stories

    • “Needs” lists for each area


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    Charlotte

    Observer’s

    “Needs” List


    What we know

    What we know:

    • Triggers civic behavior

    • Increases knowledge

    • Builds credibility

    • Citizens “get” it

    • Builds civic capacity

    • Builds reporting capacity


    Master narratives

    MasterNarratives

    Covering the Noise

    Vs.

    Covering the Silences


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    The New City


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    Aging Matters


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    Deadliest

    Drug


    Mental checklist

    Mental Checklist

    • How do you position people?

      √ As color or furniture that you move around?

      √ Or as a citizen capable of action?


    Mental checklist1

    Mental Checklist

    Do you only raise awareness?

    √ Can a story invite input, ideas?

    √ Can it help readers do something with the information?


    Mental checklist2

    Mental Checklist

    Have you talked to all stakeholders?

    √ Do you report more than two sides of the story?

    √ Do the pros and cons get you the real story?


    Mental checklist3

    Mental Checklist

    Do you report internal and external conflict?

    √ Do you help people see possible choices and consequences of those choices?

    √ Do you examine conflicting values?


    Mental checklist4

    Mental Checklist

    Do you advance solutions?

    √ Report what has worked elsewhere?

    √ Invite community brainstorming?


    Mental checklist5

    Mental Checklist

    Do you invite participation?

    √ How can people respond?

    √ Are there “entry points” for input?


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    2001 Pew Poll


    Want more interactivity

    Want more interactivity


    Build connections

    Build Connections


    Less noise

    Less Noise

    More Meaningful Interaction


    The institute for interactive journalism

    The Institute

    for Interactive Journalism

    www.j-lab.org


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