Sadomasochism
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SADOMASOCHISM. Kristen Ellison, Stephanie Efferson, Alexandra DePrince, Anatesha Dunn. DSM-IV Criteria For Sadism.

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SADOMASOCHISM

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Sadomasochism

SADOMASOCHISM

Kristen Ellison, Stephanie Efferson, Alexandra DePrince, Anatesha Dunn


Dsm iv criteria for sadism

DSM-IV Criteria For Sadism

  • Over a period of at least 6 months, recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors involving the act (real, not simulated) of being humiliated, beaten, bound, or otherwise made to suffer

  • The fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.


Dsm iv criteria for masochism

DSM-IV Criteria for Masochism

  • Over a period of at least 6 months, recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors involving acts (real, not simulated) in which the psychological or physical suffering (including humiliation) of the victim is sexually exciting to the person.

  • The fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.


Definitions

Definitions

  • Sadist- A person who derives sexual satisfaction from inflicting pain on another person

  • Masochist- A person who derives sexual satisfaction from experiencing pain.

  • Sadomasochism- The consensual interaction between a sadist and masochist (Hyde and DeLamater 429).


Causes of masochism and sadism

Causes of Masochism and Sadism

  • Learning Theory- conditioning; a little boy is being spanked over his mothers knee and his penis rubs against her knee and he gets an erection. The child learns to associate pain to sexual arousal; setting up a lifelong career as a masochist (Hyde and DeLamater 430).


Causes of masochism and sadism1

Causes of Masochism and Sadism

  • Psychoanalytic Theory- result of childhood trauma or significant childhood experiences that manifest itself in exhibitionistic behavior (“Sexual Masochism”).


Causes of masochism and sadism2

Causes of Masochism and Sadism

  • Behavioral Learning Theory- models suggest that a child who is the victim or observer of inappropriate sexual behaviors learn to imitate and is later reinforced for the behavior (“Sexual Masochism”).


Causes of masochism and sadism3

Causes of Masochism and Sadism

  • Physiological Theory- focuses on the relationship between hormones, behavior, and the central nervous system with particular interest of aggression and male sexual hormones (“Sexual Masochism”).


Treatments

Treatments

  • Treatment is rarely provided unless a sadist is convicted for assault on a non-consenting victim.

  • If the actions of the sadist are brought to attention and treatment is sought there are various options.

    Pharmalogical- medication treatments: medoroxyprogesterone acetate [Depro-Vera] and cyproterone acetate decrease levels of circulating testerone decreasing drive and aggression (“Sexual Masochism”).


Treatments1

Treatments

Surgical- castration and steroatactic neurosurgery

Psychotherapy- aimed at uncovering and working through the underlying cause of the behavior.

Cognitive-Behavioral- Aversive conditioning using stimuli to decrease and eliminate behavior (“Sexual Masochism”).


Statistics

Statistics

  • Men typically enjoy sadomasochism starting in childhood.

  • Women are usually introduced to sadomasochism by someone else.

  • Most participants in sadomasochism are heterosexual.

  • Women prefer bondage, spanking, oral sex, and master-slave role playing (Hyde and DeLamater 430).


Statistics1

Statistics

  • Sadomasochist fantasies are common but most people who find these fantasies arousing do not want to experience them in real life (Masters et al.).

  • Some individuals are bothered by their sadist or masochist fantasies (DSM-IV 529-30).


Milder forms of sadomasochism

Milder Forms of Sadomasochism

  • 24 mammals other than humans bite during sex.

  • 26% of men and women experience arousal at being bitten (Hyde and DeLamater 430).

  • 18% of men and 20% of women have used a blindfold during sex (Klein 81).


Typical forms of sadomasochism

Typical Forms of Sadomasochism

  • 5-10% of the US population engages in sadomasochism for sexual pleasure on at least an occasional basis with most incidences being mild or staged activities involving no real pain or violence (Reinisch 162-63).

  • Of 178 men that responded to a survey in S&M magazine, the majority had tried and enjoyed humiliation, bondage, spanking, whipping, fetish behavior, tying up with ropes, and master-slave roles (Hyde and DeLamater 430).


Typical forms of sadomasochism1

Typical Forms of Sadomasochism

  • In one survey of 130 men and 52 women:

    -33% of men and 28% women preferred

    dominate roles.

    -41% of men and 40% of women

    preferred submissive roles

    -26% of men and 32% of women are versatile (Hyde and DeLamater 430).


Sadomasochism today

Sadomasochism Today

  • Sadomasochism is gaining more popularity.

  • There is an S&M themed restaurant in New York that a person can pay $20 to be humiliated by the staff. (i.e. spanking or whipping) (Luck)


Works cited

Works Cited

  • Firdy, M. B. (Ed.). (1994). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.

  • Hyde, J.S. & DeLamater, J.D.

    Understanding Human Sexuality. (8th ed.). Boston: McGraw Hill. (429-431).

  • Luck, Otto. “The Nice Little S&M Restaurant Down the Block.” NY Rock. May 1999. 4 April 2004. <http://www.nyrock.com/spc/1999/maison.asp>

  • Masters, W., Johnson, V., & Kolodny, R.

    (1985). Human sexuality (2nd ed.). Boston: Little, Brown & Co., p.447.

  • Reinisch, J.M. (1990). Kinsey Institute New Report on Sex, St. Martin’s Press: pg. 162-163.

  • “Sexual Masochism.” Psychology Today. 10 October 2002.


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