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H1N1 Influenza Liz Ritchie, M.S. Risk Communication Analyst Office of Public Health Preparedness A couple housekeeping things… Welcome! My presentation = 20 minutes. Your questions = 10 minutes. A little about me. This might be our first meeting, but shouldn’t be the last.

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H1n1 influenza l.jpg

H1N1 Influenza

Liz Ritchie, M.S.

Risk Communication Analyst

Office of Public Health Preparedness


A couple housekeeping things l.jpg
A couple housekeeping things…

  • Welcome!

  • My presentation = 20 minutes.

  • Your questions = 10 minutes.

  • A little about me.

  • This might be our first meeting, but shouldn’t be the last.


What i will cover l.jpg
What I will cover…

  • Some history.

  • Some very basic biology.

  • A little terminology.

  • Reflections on recent experience.

  • What now?


Some history l.jpg

Last Four Pandemics

1918: Influenza A (H1N1), severe, killed 20 million

1957: Influenza A (H2N2), moderate, killed 70,000

1968: Influenza A (H3N2), moderate, killed 34,000

2009: Influenza A (H1N1), mild, killed ?

Strong potential for animal infection spreading to humans (zoonosis).

Some History


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Some Very Basic Biology

  • Virus

    • ~1/100th size of bacteria

    • examples: influenza, smallpox, Ebola, HIV, polio

    • covered by protein coat

    • some have fat envelope

    • host cell required for reproduction

    • not all cause disease

    • high mutation rate

    • antibiotics are ineffective

    • can treat with antivirals or vaccines (if available)


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A little terminology…

  • Immunity: a protective element, often gained by previous exposure.

  • Novel: something we’ve never seen before.

    • no vaccine available

    • may or may not have effective antivirals

    • no natural immunity

  • Transmissibility: how easy something spreads from one thing to another.

  • Virulence: how likely something is to cause disease.


Recent experience l.jpg

2009 Influenza A (H1N1) – pandemic strain

99% of Influenza-Like Illness (ILI) = this strain

Michigan schools closed = 73

Michigan ILI (October 25-31) = 59,629

Michigan H1N1-related Deaths = ~17

48 U.S. states reporting “widespread activity”

Global: over 441,661 cases with 5712 deaths… < 1%

Avian Influenza A (H5N1)

widely circulating since 2003

15 countries

442 cases with 262 deaths… 59%

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/

World Health Organization

http://www.who.int/

Recent Experience


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Prevention

  • Vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza infection and its complications.

    • Vaccine is slowly being produced… about 10 million doses each week.

    • Expect the H1N1 vaccine to be as safe as seasonal flu vaccines.

    • Children require two shots for full immune response.

    • Current target groups: pregnant women, people 6-24, anyone who has regular contact with children < 6 months old, emergency and healthcare personnel, and anyone with underlying health conditions.

  • Everyday actions can help prevent transmission.

    • Wash your hands regularly with soap and water.

    • Don’t cough/sneeze on people (or in your hands).

    • Stay home if you’re sick.


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Treatment

  • Antivirals (Tamiflu®, Relenza®)

    • patients who are severely ill (such as those who are hospitalized)

    • patients who are ill with influenza-like illness and have a higher risk for influenza related complications

  • In vast majority of cases, healthy individuals recover from H1N1 influenza.

    • lots of fluids

    • rest

    • antipyretics to reduce fever/discomfort

    • cough syrup


What now l.jpg
What Now?

  • Get your seasonal and H1N1 vaccines.

  • Regularly check the CDC’s and Michigan’s influenza websites.

    • www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu

    • www.michigan.gov/flu

  • 911 Coordinators should be in contact with their respective LHD/hospital emergency preparedness coordinator(s), health officer(s), and medical director(s).

  • Regularly check the local health department website(s) for your area.


Thank you l.jpg
Thank You!

Liz Ritchie

Risk Communication Analyst

Office of Public Health Preparedness

(517) 335-8839

[email protected]


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