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Thirty Three Years of Teaching Thirty Years of Teaching Astronomy Including methods good or bad, you decide.

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Thirty Three Years of Teaching Thirty Years of Teaching Astronomy Including methods good or bad, you decide. Military Service (1959-1962) College (1962-1966) UMD -- Physics & Math. First Teaching Position (1966 -1969) (physics and math) Almont, Mich . . Almont Science Fair.

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slide1
Thirty Three Years of TeachingThirty Years of Teaching AstronomyIncluding methods good or bad, you decide.
project physics chapters unifying astronomy physics students interested in the astronomy sections
Project Physics --Chapters unifying Astronomy & Physics (Students interested in the Astronomy sections)
slide8
Borrowed Telescope From Westby Teacher.Photo of 1st Qtr. Moon. (Enlarged, Presented as argument for own scope)
slide11
Purchase of Cave 6 inch reflector scope (story of cigarette ashes) Start Separate course for Astronomy
slide12

Astrophotography becomes major part of course work.

  • Six Methods
  • Moon Phases
  • Position of Planets in night sky.
  • Position of Jupiter\'s Moons
  • Constellations
  • Meteor Showers
  • “Fun stuff”
slide15
Report in Sky and Telescope Credit given to University of California University of Wisconsin –Eau Claire Viroqua High School
slide16

Students ask again: Why not have our own observatory? Studied what it would take to build one; i.e. requirements, building design, funding, etc. Approached administration and told no. Students decide to carry forth anyway.

slide17

Form Viroqua Astronomical Society – raise funds, gather community support, make plans. Etc.Students (VAS) approach school with plan, build on school ground, financed outside of school, district agrees to maintain structure.)

students start construction all volunteer work roof blows off new design and new roof constructed
Students start construction, all volunteer work. Roof blows off, new design and new roof constructed.
slide21

Observatory opens. Parents and Grandparents become active viewers. Host WAAPT conference – gain support of professionals throughout the state. Bob Elliott

slide22

Student Builds own scope, goes on for Phd in Astrophysics, works at Optical Mirror Facility in Tucson.

slide23

Students spend full evenings at observatory Class sleeps on floor of classroom in mornings on occasion.Students master 6 methods of astrophotography.

slide25

Class taught with the idea of teaching methods of science. Study of different areas of Astronomy with emphasis on developing a lifelong appreciation for the sky. Sample photos, of sky, building, and students can be seen in notebook and on bulletin board.

slide27

Applied for leave of absence, turned down, resigned. Joined La Crosse Schools - 1979Appointed Planetarium Director (not shown facility during interview in 1970)

slide29

Planetarium use was minimal at this time. Don Olson - Physics Teacher kept the Planetarium Open Purchase of telescope - Meade 8 inch.Designed planetarium programs for total school district - grades k-12.Planetarium counted as part of teaching job.

slide30

Obtain Grant: Purchase of two Meade 8 inch and 3 astroscan scopes. Gave the first scope to other high school. They add astronomy as course of study.Astronomy accepted for science credit by many major universities.

slide31

.Wednesday evening viewing started. Students required to make observations and one major project. Do not have to be with teacher. Letter from superintendent releasing evening viewing from school rule of no activity on Wed. Eve. (example: Comet Hyakutake and Hale Bopp story; First evening no optics, just a blanket.; Joined by community members, university students, friends.

slide32

Occasional special times, solar and lunar eclipses, cookouts, etc.Field Trips to Hobbs Observatory - A time of learning for all, I am very proud of what they accomplished. Stories, examples Sara, Andy, Jessica, Gabe, etc.

slide34

Course Requirements

  • Three viewings of night sky per term
slide35

Course Requirements

  • Three viewings of night sky per term
  • Course Project due by end of Semester
slide36

Course Requirements

  • Three viewings of night sky per term
  • Course Project due by end of Semester
    • Must be presented orally & written
slide37

Course Requirements

  • Three viewings of night sky per term
  • Course Project due by end of Semester
    • Must be presented orally & written
    • Use talents, artistic, poet, music, hands on ability, etc.
slide38

Course Requirements

  • Three viewings of night sky per term
  • Course Project due by end of Semester
    • Must be presented orally & written
    • Use talents, artistic, poet, music, hands on ability, etc.
    • Can be done in groups if project warrants large numbers.
slide40

Laboratory Work Groups

  • Only three classmates per group.
slide41

Laboratory Work Groups

  • Only three classmates per group.
  • One must be mathematical in approach
slide42

Laboratory Work Groups

  • Only three classmates per group.
  • One must be mathematical in approach
  • One must be thinker, abstract is good.
slide43

Laboratory Work Groups

  • Only three classmates per group.
  • One must be mathematical in approach
  • One must be thinker, abstract is good.
  • One must be hands on type of person
slide44

Laboratory Work Groups

  • Only three classmates per group.
  • One must be mathematical in approach
  • One must be thinker, abstract is good.
  • One must be hands on type of person
  • All must help out handicapped.
  • All must write own report.
slide45

Software Used

  • Planetarium Software - Voyager by Carina Software, Full featured planetarium software.
  • Crystal Lake Observatory - by John Young, Software simulating a 24inch telescope using various eyepieces, photometer and ccd camera.
  • Purchase of ccd camera helps.
slide46

Spreadsheet software for analyzing data and making calculations which are necessary.

  • Graphical Analysis for graphing of data.
  • HRCalc - HRCalc allows you to select real or imaginary stars and plot their positions on the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. By changing the star\'s values, you are able to see it shift position on the HR scale. The program also graphically displays the star\'s size in relation to the Sun, another graphic displays size compared to our solar system.
slide47

Equipment to accomplish mission.

  • Computers for Teacher and one for every three students for labs.
  • Telescopes - Two or more, must be portable.
  • Binoculars - 7 X 50 and 10 X 80
  • Cameras - 35 mm with tripod, cable release, etc. Access to dark room if possible.
  • Camera adapters for telescopes for various methods.
slide48

Mission

Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.

slide49

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
slide50

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
  • Investigate Variable Stars
slide51

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
  • Investigate Variable Stars
  • Classify Stars by size and temperature.
slide52

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
  • Investigate Variable Stars
  • Classify Stars by size and temperature.
  • Classify Galaxies
slide53

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
  • Investigate Variable Stars
  • Classify Stars by size and temperature.
  • Classify Galaxies
  • Learn distance measurement of light years, par sec, and au’s.
slide54

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
  • Investigate Variable Stars
  • Classify Stars by size and temperature.
  • Classify Galaxies
  • Learn distance measurement of light years and par sec
  • Make model of items we find vs distances.
slide55

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
  • Investigate Variable Stars
  • Classify Stars by size and temperature.
  • Classify Galaxies
  • Learn distance measurement of light years and par sec
  • Make model of items we find vs distances.
  • Find Solar System.
slide56

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
  • Investigate Variable Stars
  • Classify Stars by size and temperature.
  • Classify Galaxies
  • Learn distance measurement of light years and par sec
  • Make model of items we find vs distances.
  • Find Solar System.
  • Investigate Solar System- classify planets, meteors, asteroids, satellites, kuiper object, comets, etc. (Is Pluto a planet?)
slide57

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
  • Investigate Variable Stars
  • Classify Stars by size and temperature.
  • Classify Galaxies
  • Learn distance measurement of light years and par sec
  • Make model of items we find vs distances.
  • Find Solar System.
  • Investigate Solar System- classify planets, meteors, asteroids, satellites, kuiper object, comets, etc. (Is Pluto a planet?)
  • Find our home called Earth Moon system - now you are home and can complete the course.
slide58

Mission

  • Lost in Space - Investigate and find the way home.
  • Investigate Deep Space - nebulae, galaxies, clusters and stars.
  • Investigate Variable Stars
  • Classify Stars by size and temperature.
  • Classify Galaxies
  • Learn distance measurement of light years and par sec
  • Make model of items we find vs distances.
  • Find Solar System.
  • Investigate Solar System- classify planets, meteors, asteroids, satellites, kuiper object, comets, etc. (Is Pluto a planet?)
  • Find our home called Earth Moon system - now you are home and can complete the course.
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