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What is Showmanship - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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This presentation Copyright 2009 Bruce Chadwick, All Rights Reserved. MAGIC and Showmanship. What is Showmanship?. What is Showmanship?. “the ability to put romance, mystery, the element of suspense, interest, emotional feeling, and effectiveness into your performance.” Harlan Tarbell.

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MAGIC

and

Showmanship

what is showmanship5
What is Showmanship?

“the ability to put romance, mystery, the element of suspense, interest, emotional feeling, and effectiveness into your performance.”

Harlan Tarbell

what is showmanship6
What is Showmanship?

“Showmanship brings out the meaning of a performance and gives it an importance that it might otherwise lack.”

Henning Nelms

what is showmanship7
What is Showmanship?

“applying skill and taste and creativity. It is a form of expression that variously combines nobility, beauty, depth, and grace.”

Tristan

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Showmanship is a designation to describe all the theatrical elements that go into the performance of magic.

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Showmanship is a designation to describe all the theatrical elements that go into the performance of magic.

Showmanship encompasses all areas of presentation including how the performer moves, speaks, his choice of words, his timing, and his skill.

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Showmanship is a designation to describe all the theatrical elements that go into the performance of magic.

Showmanship encompasses all areas of presentation including how the performer moves, speaks, his choice of words, his timing, and his skill.

Showmanship can include the magician’s appearance, his attire or costume, look of his props, his personality, demeanor, magnetism, characterization and style.

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Showmanship is a designation to describe all the theatrical elements that go into the performance of magic.

Showmanship encompasses all areas of presentation including how the performer moves, speaks, his choice of words, his timing, and his skill.

Showmanship can include the magician’s appearance, his attire or costume, look of his props, his personality, demeanor, magnetism, characterization and style.

Showmanship includes focus of attention, the way a performer controls his audience and establishes rapport, how he puts together his routines, chooses his effects, and maintains flow and continuity.

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Maskelyne and Devant in their monumental book OUR MAGIC state that there are threekinds of art.

FALSE ART

NORMAL ART

HIGH ART

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The field of endeavor most closely related to the performance of magic is theatre and drama.

Most of the staging techniques, principles, and philosophies that playwrights, theatrical directors, and actors use apply to the performance of magic.

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The tools of the theatre are available to themagician in the same way they are availableto the actor. The only difference is that actorstake them for granted, whereas few conjurers are even aware they exist. – Henning Nelms

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Tarbell says, “The more power you have to build these elements into your work, the greater will be your rewards. Take your example from the playwright. He puts into his plays the same principle of showmanship which you must use. He creates interest in his audience, arouses their emotions, and builds up from lesser effect to greater until he reaches a climax.”

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“And you must work in the same way. The Showman makes a masterpiece of a commonplace trick. He clothes it properly, he studies his presentation, he stirs up his audience with interest and suspense, he puts reality into the part he is playing, he works the whole thing up to a climax.”

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STOOPING AND KNEELING

Kneel on theDownstage Knee

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Crossing

In crossing to a person or an object above or below you, it is best to cross in a curve so you do not arrive either upstage or downstage of the person or object.

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The use of the curve automatically turns your faceand body position toward the audience at theend of the movement.

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BASIC BLOCKING OR MOVEMENT RULES

  • Play scenes in a quarter position.
  • Make turns downstage.
  • Make gestures or pass objects with the upstage arm.
  • Kneel on the downstage knee.
  • Get there in three and a half steps.
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The West Coast Defines theStandard for Voice and Diction. Watch the news broadcasters and listen to their diction.

what to say
What to Say
  • Shorter is Usually Better
  • Rate Often Defines Crispness
  • Put the Punch Line at the End
  • Memorization vs Extemporization
  • Scripts vs Outlines
how to say it
How to Say It
  • Pencil and Marble Exercises
  • Enunciation and Clarity
  • How to Project
  • Talk to the back of the room
sight
Sight
  • Do not be afraid of your audience’s eyes. Make eye contact with them. It will help to establish rapport.
sight60
Sight

There are two basic ways to perform You can look at your audience and acknowledge their presence. We call this “Presentational.”

sight61
Sight

The second way to perform is like when an audience watches a play. The proscenium arch of the stage becomes a sort of window that the audience watches through. The actors onstage do not usually acknowledge the audience.

look to the back wall
Look to the Back Wall

Focusing on the back wall of the room where you are performing makes it appear that you are acknowledging all the audience. Also the audience will be able to see all your facial features.

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Charlize Theron

Charlize Theron starred as serial killer Aileen Wuornos in the film Monster (2003).

Film critic Roger Ebert called it "one of the greatest performances in the history of the cinema.”

She won the Best Actress Oscar for her role in that film at the 76th Academy Awards in February 2004

two kinds of actors
Two Kinds of Actors
  • True-Life actors portray themselves onstage using the real character they are in everyday life.
two kinds of actors75
Two Kinds of Actors
  • True-Life actors portray themselves onstage using the real character they are in everyday life.
  • Character actors portray roles onstage that are totally different than the way the actor is in real life.
superior actors
Superior actors . . .
  • are able to convince audiences that the character they portray onstage might be the same character they are in everyday life.
superior actors77
Superior actors . . .
  • are able to convince audiences that the character they portray onstage might be the same character they are in everyday life.
  • act convincing enough so that the audience has no problem suspending their disbelief when they watch them perform.
applause
Applause
  • An acknowledgment of appreciation.
  • Determine where you want applause.
  • Give them cues where to applaud.
  • Don’t wear out your audience.
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The Power of Three

The stoplight is red, yellow, and green.

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The Power of Three

The stoplight is red, yellow, and green.

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again!

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The Power of Three

The stoplight is red, yellow, and green.

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again!

Three primary colors.

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The Power of Three

The stoplight is red, yellow, and green.

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again!

Three strikes and you’re out!

Three primary colors.

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The Power of Three

The stoplight is red, yellow, and green.

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again!

Three strikes and you’re out!

Three primary colors.

On your mark, get set, go!

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The Power of Three

The stoplight is red, yellow, and green.

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again!

Three strikes and you’re out!

Three primary colors.

God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit

On your mark, get set, go!

slide90

The Power of Three

The stoplight is red, yellow, and green.

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again!

Three strikes and you’re out!

Three primary colors.

God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit

On your mark, get set, go!

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FOCUS OF ATTENTION

MOVEMENT:The moving object commands the most attention (body, walking, object, speed, degrees of movement, size of movement).

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FOCUS OF ATTENTION

SIZE:The larger the object, themore attention it commands.

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FOCUS OF ATTENTION

HEIGHT:The taller the object, themore attention it commands

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FOCUS OF ATTENTION

DEPTH:That which is closest (will also appear largest), usually commands the most attention. Stage right is hotter than stage left.

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FOCUS OF ATTENTION

COLOR:Brighter colors usually commandthe most attention.

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FOCUS OF ATTENTION

SOUND:That which is loudest usuallycommands the most attention.

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FOCUS OF ATTENTION

POINTING:Finger or arm, eyes and face, physicalbody, head nodding, facial expression.

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FOCUS OF ATTENTION

ILLUMINATION:Light and dark, bright and dim, brilliant and subdues, the more light, the more attention.

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FOCUS OF ATTENTION

BALANCE:That which is aesthetically pleasing usually commands the most attention. Lines and patterns, the more attention.

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MAGIC

and

Showmanship

This presentation Copyright 2009 Bruce Chadwick, All Rights Reserved