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Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001. 80 % have access at home ... Activities on the Internet. Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001. Q. How much do you ...

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Parenting the Net Generation ©Media Awareness Network 2003

Slide 1:The (insert your community name here) is pleased to welcome you to this event. (Note to presenters: check marks ? indicate when to click the mouse to make text or images appear on the screen.)The (insert your community name here) is pleased to welcome you to this event.

www.media-awareness.ca

Slide 2:The presentation you are about to see has been created by Canada’s Media Awareness Network (MNet for short) to help parents better understand what their kids are doing on the Internet. It’s designed to give you some practical advice and tools – so that you can guide your children to think more critically about the Internet. MNet is a Canadian non-profit organization whose mission is to help teachers, parents and community leaders educate young Canadians to become more aware of the role of the media in their lives. The presentation you are about to see has been created by Canada’s Media Awareness Network (MNet for short) to help parents better understand what their kids are doing on the Internet. It’s designed to give you some practical advice and tools – so that you can guide your children to think more critically about the Internet.

Slide 3:Parents today are already time-stressed, so adding Internet supervision and involvement to their responsibilities is a daunting challenge. The good news is – you’re not alone in facing this challenge. Public libraries are gearing up to help parents and kids develop information and digital literacy skills. At the community level, we’re encouraging parents to work together, through your schools and public libraries, to learn more about the Internet and to share knowledge with other parents. At the end of this presentation, I’ll give you a practical checklist of things you can do. Parents today are already time-stressed, so adding Internet supervision and involvement to their responsibilities is a daunting challenge. The good news is – you’re not alone in facing this challenge. Public libraries are gearing up to help parents and kids develop information and digital literacy skills. At the community level, we’re encouraging parents to work together, through your schools and public libraries, to learn more about the Internet and to share knowledge with other parents. At the end of this presentation, I’ll give you a practical checklist of things you can do.

© Media Awareness Network 2003 Kids for Sale: Online marketing to kids and privacy issues Fact or Folly: Authenticating online information Safe Passage: Teaching kids to be safe and responsible online Parenting the Net Generation

Slide 4:This presentation looks at three areas of concern related to kids going online: ? Kids for Sale – about online marketing to kids, and privacy issues ? Safe Passage – about helping kids to be safe and responsible online ? Fact or Folly – about making sure online information is accurate This presentation looks at three areas of concern related to kids going online:

Young Canadians In A Wired World 99 % of students have used the Internet Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001 80 % have access at home 48 % go online every day

Slide 5:The data in this presentation comes from a research project called Young Canadians In A Wired World – a nation-wide investigation of how young people use the Internet. MNet surveyed over a thousand parents and nearly six thousand children and teens to better understand what Canadian kids are doing online – and whether they’re engaging in risky behaviours. The survey confirms that the Internet has become a fixture in Canadian kids’ lives: ? 99 per cent of Canadians students, aged 9 to 17, have used the Internet ? 48 per cent go online every day ? 80 per cent have Internet access in the home The data in this presentation comes from a research project called Young Canadians In A Wired World – a nation-wide investigation of how young people use the Internet. MNet surveyed over a thousand parents and nearly six thousand children and teens to better understand what Canadian kids are doing online – and whether they’re engaging in risky behaviours.

Activities on the Internet Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001

Slide 6:Even though kids mostly surf the Internet from home, the research shows that most parents are quite unaware of their kids’ online activities. Parents believe that doing homework is their children’s number one online activity. But kids say they use the Internet mainly for entertainment and communication. E-mail tops their list of favourite activities, at 71 per cent, followed by instant messaging and chat, both at 56 per cent. Even though kids mostly surf the Internet from home, the research shows that most parents are quite unaware of their kids’ online activities.

Q. How much do you talk about Internet use? A. “A great deal” or “a fair bit” Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001

Slide 7:For the most part, Canadian parents feel confident that they have open communication with their kids about their online activities: 78 per cent say they talk to their kids “a great deal” or “a fair bit.” However, Only 24 per cent of young Canadians say they talk to their parents about the Internet “a great deal” or “a fair bit.” For the most part, Canadian parents feel confident that they have open communication with their kids about their online activities: 78 per cent say they talk to their kids “a great deal” or “a fair bit.”

Slide 8:Kids have learned the most about the Internet from:

Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001 Not surprisingly, most young people are way ahead of their parents in their knowledge of the Net. When asked how they learned about the Internet, the majority of kids say “from friends” or “exploring on my own.” Almost half of them say they know more about the Internet than their parents do. Not surprisingly, most young people are way ahead of their parents in their knowledge of the Net. When asked how they learned about the Internet, the majority of kids say “from friends” or “exploring on my own.” Almost half of them say they know more about the Internet than their parents do.

The Internet generation: multi-tasking

Slide 9:This generation has brought new meaning to the term “multi-tasking.” Kids often simultaneously download and listen to music, check their e-mail and instant messages, and talk on the telephone – all while doing their homework! This generation has brought new meaning to the term “multi-tasking.” Kids often simultaneously download and listen to music, check their e-mail and instant messages, and talk on the telephone – all while doing their homework!

Slide 10:Adults tend to view the Internet as a practical tool. But for kids, it’s a place – a virtual world, away from parental supervision – where they talk to friends, play games and join online communities. Parents tend to be aware of the more sensational aspects of the Internet, but few understand the Internet cultures their kids belong to, or the issues relating to interactivity, privacy, marketing, and easy access to unlimited – and often unreliable – information. Adults tend to view the Internet as a practical tool. But for kids, it’s a place – a virtual world, away from parental supervision – where they talk to friends, play games and join online communities.

Kids for Sale Online marketing to kids and privacy issues

Slide 11:We’re going to start our tour of Internet issues by looking at the commercial side of the Web. Marketers have discovered that the Internet is a great medium to target and captivate young people. We’re going to start our tour of Internet issues by looking at the commercial side of the Web. Marketers have discovered that the Internet is a great medium to target and captivate young people.

Part of kid culture Interactive medium Limitless potential for collecting data No regulations for advertising to children Why marketers love the Internet

Slide 12:What makes the Net so appealing to marketers? ? As the MNet survey results show, the Internet is an extremely important part of kids’ lives today. ? It offers marketers something that television can’t – interactivity. When kids “play” interactive games based on commercial products, marketers are building brand name loyalty and recognition. ? The Internet makes it easy to collect and store data from young people. Using information collected from online contests and registration forms, marketers can tailor advertising to specific children. ? And while there are regulations about advertising to children in the broadcasting and print media, none of them apply on the Internet. ________________________________ 1 Source:YTV Kids and Tweens Report, 2000What makes the Net so appealing to marketers? ? As the MNet survey results show, the Internet is an extremely important part of kids’ lives today.

Slide 13:To capitalize on the Internet’s interactivity, companies create special online worlds for kids where advertising and entertainment are seamlessly integrated. ? For example, on the McDonald’s Web site kids can play interactive games with food like “Sauce Splat” where you get points for hitting McNuggets with different types of sauces. ?And in the Arts and Crafts section kids can download posters and place mats of McDonald’s characters to colour in. While there are broadcasting rules that prohibit corporate spokescharacters from having their own TV programs, on the Internet there’s nothing to stop kids from spending hours interacting with personalities such as Ronald McDonald. Marketers refer to online games centred around brands, products or brand-related characters as “Advergames.” It’s important that kids learn to recognize these for what they are – interactive commercials.” To capitalize on the Internet’s interactivity, companies create special online worlds for kids where advertising and entertainment are seamlessly integrated.

Slide 14:Advergames also show up on sites aimed at older kids. The popular Candystand site, for example, is an environment where ? every game and contest on the site relates to Lifesaver products. These sites are extremely effective at engaging kids. As one marketer revealed: “It’s very difficult to imagine anyone staring at a magazine or banner ad for three to eight minutes – but kids will happily play brand-focused games for long periods of time.” Marketers call this youthful demographic “sticky traffic.” Advergames also show up on sites aimed at older kids. The popular Candystand site, for example, is an environment where ? every game and contest on the site relates to Lifesaver products.

Slide 15:Many advergame sites – especially those aimed at pre-teen and teenaged boys – are based on adult products like cars and alcohol. Many advergame sites – especially those aimed at pre-teen and teenaged boys – are based on adult products like cars and alcohol.

Slide 16:Companies targeting young people online with alcohol products isn’t a new problem. In 1999, the U.S.-based Center for Media Education found that 62 per cent of beer and alcohol Web sites displayed what they call “youth-oriented features” – designed to appeal to the adolescent and pre-adolescent set. Companies targeting young people online with alcohol products isn’t a new problem. In 1999, the U.S.-based Center for Media Education found that 62 per cent of beer and alcohol Web sites displayed what they call “youth-oriented features” – designed to appeal to the adolescent and pre-adolescent set.

Slide 17:There’s another important concern with commercial Web sites – and that’s privacy. Personal information is a valuable commodity online; and marketers use contests, surveys and online forms to elicit data that they then use to influence consumer behaviour. The MuchMusic Web site is among the top sites for Canadian girls, aged 11 to 17. On the day this slide was made, the Much home page hosted ? five contests – offering users the chance to win everything from a million dollars cash to a trip to Hollywood. There’s another important concern with commercial Web sites – and that’s privacy. Personal information is a valuable commodity online; and marketers use contests, surveys and online forms to elicit data that they then use to influence consumer behaviour.

Slide 18:All the contests, including this one sponsored by Dentyne gum, ? asked contestants to submit detailed personal information, but nowhere on the page is there a link to a privacy policy that explains what happens to the information. ? Many of the contests also encourage users to increase their chances of winning by giving the e-mail addresses of several of their friends. Contests and online surveys are so pervasive on commercial Web sites that users have come to expect them. All the contests, including this one sponsored by Dentyne gum, ? asked contestants to submit detailed personal information, but nowhere on the page is there a link to a privacy policy that explains what happens to the information. ? Many of the contests also encourage users to increase their chances of winning by giving the e-mail addresses of several of their friends.

Slide 19:The Neopets Web site is one of the most popular in North America for the 9-12 set. Visitors create their own fantastic creatures called Neopets, and collect “Neopoints” to buy food and presents for their virtual pets. One way for kids to earn Neopoints is to fill out market surveys. ? This survey focuses on food, with questions for kids about their favourite chocolate bars, cereal brands and breakfast habits. The survey also asks kids to submit their name, e-mail address, age and gender. The Neopets Web site is one of the most popular in North America for the 9-12 set. Visitors create their own fantastic creatures called Neopets, and collect “Neopoints” to buy food and presents for their virtual pets. One way for kids to earn Neopoints is to fill out market surveys. ? This survey focuses on food, with questions for kids about their favourite chocolate bars, cereal brands and breakfast habits. The survey also asks kids to submit their name, e-mail address, age and gender.

Slide 20:Children under thirteen who want to fill out the survey are told to get their parents’ permission. But there’s nothing to stop them from submitting an older age. The survey also asks for information about education level, country and postal code, ethnic background and Internet use. Children under thirteen who want to fill out the survey are told to get their parents’ permission. But there’s nothing to stop them from submitting an older age.

Slide 21:Parents may not think it’s a big deal for their children to give out personal information on commercial Web sites. But they should consider these issues: All data, including aggregate data, is gold to marketers. It can be used to craft extremely effective advertising campaigns that target kids of specific ages. Thanks to sophisticated information-gathering practices, our kids have become the most marketed-to generation in history. ?More seriously, if kids routinely give out information on commercial sites – they may not stop and think about giving out personally identifiable information in more risky online environments.Parents may not think it’s a big deal for their children to give out personal information on commercial Web sites. But they should consider these issues:

Slide 22:For example, when kids sign up for this popular instant messaging software they are asked to fill out a personal profile. The fields include their “real” name and address ?and details about their personal life, including their hobbies, interests and “favourite things.” Once completed, this profile is available to anyone on the Internet who wants to pull it up and read it. Most kids don’t think twice about giving personal information in online registration forms. Almost 70 per cent of Canadian students say they gave their real name when applying for a free e-mail account such as Hotmail. For example, when kids sign up for this popular instant messaging software they are asked to fill out a personal profile. The fields include their “real” name and address ?and details about their personal life, including their hobbies, interests and “favourite things.” Once completed, this profile is available to anyone on the Internet who wants to pull it up and read it. Most kids don’t think twice about giving personal information in online registration forms. Almost 70 per cent of Canadian students say they gave their real name when applying for a free e-mail account such as Hotmail.

Safe Passage Teaching kids to be safe and responsible online

Slide 23:To understand some of the safety risks associated with the Internet, let’s take a look at the various online activities kids engage in – and the extent to which parents are involved in their kids’ online interactions.To understand some of the safety risks associated with the Internet, let’s take a look at the various online activities kids engage in – and the extent to which parents are involved in their kids’ online interactions.

Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001 Parental monitoring of Internet use

Slide 24:The younger generation considers the Internet its own world, separate from parents’ reach and knowledge. It’s easy to see why, when you consider that most kids aren’t supervised when they’re online. 42 per cent of parents never check on their kids 54 per cent never check to see what sites their kids have visited 68 per cent of parents never sit with their kids while they surf The younger generation considers the Internet its own world, separate from parents’ reach and knowledge. It’s easy to see why, when you consider that most kids aren’t supervised when they’re online. 42 per cent of parents never check on their kids 54 per cent never check to see what sites their kids have visited 68 per cent of parents never sit with their kids while they surf

Alone on the Internet at home Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001

Slide 25:35 per cent of 9-10-year-olds say they’re alone “most of the time” when on the Internet. That number jumps to 57 per cent for 13-to-14-year-olds.35 per cent of 9-10-year-olds say they’re alone “most of the time” when on the Internet. That number jumps to 57 per cent for 13-to-14-year-olds.

Slide 26:Kids who have e-mail account(s)

Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001 Free e-mail account(s) E-mail account(s) 71 58 Overall, 71 per cent of young Canadians have one or more e-mail accounts, ?and 58 per cent of students have a free e-mail account like Hotmail or Yahoo! Overall, 71 per cent of young Canadians have one or more e-mail accounts, ?and 58 per cent of students have a free e-mail account like Hotmail or Yahoo!

Slide 27:Parents who don’t know about their child’s e-mail accounts

Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001 25 52 Elementary school students Secondary school students Half of Canadian secondary students and a quarter of the younger kids (9-12) say their parents don’t know about all their e-mail accounts. Most kids use e-mail to talk to their friends. However, 45 per cent say they often or sometimes e-mail people they’ve only met online.Half of Canadian secondary students and a quarter of the younger kids (9-12) say their parents don’t know about all their e-mail accounts.

% of kids who visit chat rooms 7.6 16.5 21.5 37.9 47.2 29.6 45.3 57.7 70.4 71.9 % of kids who visit private and age inappropriate chat rooms Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001

Slide 28:Overall, more than half of students use chat rooms. ?A surprising number of young people go into adult chat rooms or talk one-on-one in private chat areas. Nearly 40 per cent of 13-to-14-year-olds engage in this kind of risky behaviour. That’s disturbing, because young teens are a vulnerable age group online. They’re just beginning to explore their own sexuality, and they can be very naive about online relationships. Overall, more than half of students use chat rooms. ?A surprising number of young people go into adult chat rooms or talk one-on-one in private chat areas. Nearly 40 per cent of 13-to-14-year-olds engage in this kind of risky behaviour.

Slide 29:In focus groups conducted by MNet, girls aged 11-to-14 said they disguise their identities in chat rooms. But they admitted it was impossible to maintain a false identity for long and they would eventually reveal personal information when they felt they could “trust a person.” The time-frame for building this “trust” ranged from 15 minutes to several weeks – not a long time for a skillful predator to wait. In focus groups conducted by MNet, girls aged 11-to-14 said they disguise their identities in chat rooms. But they admitted it was impossible to maintain a false identity for long and they would eventually reveal personal information when they felt they could “trust a person.”

15 % have met Internet acquaintances in person 25% have been asked for a face-to-face meeting 6% took an adult Real-life Meetings

Slide 30:One quarter of Canadian students have been asked by an online acquaintance to meet in the real world. ? 15 per cent actually did so. ? But only 6 per cent of those kids took an adult with them to the meeting. Most young people who met with an online friend have no household rule against this kind of activity. One quarter of Canadian students have been asked by an online acquaintance to meet in the real world.

Slide 31:56% of kids use instant messaging

Instant messaging (or IM) can be a safer alternative to chat rooms. The use of instant messaging has exploded among young Canadians, especially kids in the middle school-years. IM can be a wonderful communications tool, if used properly. However, if kids don’t protect their privacy during the sign-up process, anyone can contact them. More than half of students who use instant messaging say they “often” or “sometimes” talk in IM to people they’ve never met in real life. Instant messaging (or IM) can be a safer alternative to chat rooms. The use of instant messaging has exploded among young Canadians, especially kids in the middle school-years.

Slide 32:And kids being kids, IM is often used to spread gossip and promote bullying. Some young people spend hours a day instant messaging with friends. This means that for many kids, home may no longer be a refuge from the peer pressures of school. And kids being kids, IM is often used to spread gossip and promote bullying. Some young people spend hours a day instant messaging with friends. This means that for many kids, home may no longer be a refuge from the peer pressures of school.

Biggest concern with child being on the Internet 51 23 18 13 Inappropriate material None Interaction/safety Other

Slide 33:Despite the risks of communicating with strangers online, only 18 per cent of Canadian parents cite interactivity and safety as their main concern with the Internet. Most parents say that their primary concern is exposure to inappropriate material, such as pornography. Despite the risks of communicating with strangers online, only 18 per cent of Canadian parents cite interactivity and safety as their main concern with the Internet.

searching for something else typing in the wrong address clicking on a link Stumbled across pornography

Slide 34:More than half of Canadian kids say they’ve ended up on porn sites accidentally, usually : ?as they were doing an online search or by ? typing in a wrong Web site address, or ? clicking on a link in an instant message, e-mail, chat room posting or Web site While sites containing pornography represent only a tiny portion of Web content, it’s very easy to stumble across them. That’s because porn marketers use some very aggressive techniques to drive traffic their way. More than half of Canadian kids say they’ve ended up on porn sites accidentally, usually : ?as they were doing an online search or by ? typing in a wrong Web site address, or ? clicking on a link in an instant message, e-mail, chat room posting or Web site While sites containing pornography represent only a tiny portion of Web content, it’s very easy to stumble across them. That’s because porn marketers use some very aggressive techniques to drive traffic their way.

Slide 35:Many sex sites charge for their content, but more and more offer free content – and in many cases, it’s very hard core stuff. These sites make money with “click-throughs” – every time someone clicks through their site to another one, their advertising revenues go up. “Stealth” sites are those that steer users their way through a variety of tricks. These include: buying up the addresses of expired Web sites; exploiting common misspellings; or using names of well-known companies or artists. ? For example, if kids mistakenly type in <pink.com> for the Web site of the popular hip hop artist “Pink,” they’ll end up on a porn site. ? The singer’s official home page is <pinkspage.com>. Many sex sites charge for their content, but more and more offer free content – and in many cases, it’s very hard core stuff.

Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001 Visited a pornographic web site on purpose

Slide 36:Young people are curious about sexuality, and many search out porn sites. A quarter of Canadian students say they have visited a porn site on purpose, and almost a third of male high school students say they visit porn sites “a lot.” Young people are curious about sexuality, and many search out porn sites. A quarter of Canadian students say they have visited a porn site on purpose, and almost a third of male high school students say they visit porn sites “a lot.”

Slide 37:The Internet is forcing us to discuss pornography with kids at a young age – and to explore with them the differences bbetween normal, healthy sexual expression, and the exploitative and deviant activity that there is so much of online. ? Many Web sites offer young people valuable information ?on sexuality and health issues, but most young Canadians (6 out of 10) say they never use the Internet to look up information about their bodies or their health. The Internet is forcing us to discuss pornography with kids at a young age – and to explore with them the differences bbetween normal, healthy sexual expression, and the exploitative and deviant activity that there is so much of online. ? Many Web sites offer young people valuable information ?on sexuality and health issues, but most young Canadians (6 out of 10) say they never use the Internet to look up information about their bodies or their health.

Slide 38:Another form of offensive online content that kids can easily come across is hate. The Hate Directory, a Web site that tracks hate on the Internet, warns that these kinds of sites are increasing, and their activities are becoming more sophisticated. ? At first glance, <martinlutherking.org> looks like a tribute to the U.S. civil rights leader. In fact, it’s a “stealth” hate site produced by the white supremacist group Storm Front. Another form of offensive online content that kids can easily come across is hate. The Hate Directory, a Web site that tracks hate on the Internet, warns that these kinds of sites are increasing, and their activities are becoming more sophisticated. ? At first glance, <martinlutherking.org> looks like a tribute to the U.S. civil rights leader. In fact, it’s a “stealth” hate site produced by the white supremacist group Storm Front.

Slide 39:There’s a thin line between actual hate, and the cruel satire and tasteless humour that’s so common on the Internet. Sites like the popular <uglypeople.com> help to foster a culture where unkindness and cruelty to others is acceptable behaviour. There’s a thin line between actual hate, and the cruel satire and tasteless humour that’s so common on the Internet. Sites like the popular <uglypeople.com> help to foster a culture where unkindness and cruelty to others is acceptable behaviour.

Slide 40:The sarcasm may seem harmless on this “Anti-Pokémon” site, ? or this sports team hate site, Lakers are Losers. The sarcasm may seem harmless on this “Anti-Pokémon” site, ? or this sports team hate site, Lakers are Losers.

Slide 41:But on many sites, the crass tone escalates to violence – on sites such <whowouldyoukill.com> ? where users post their thoughts on how they’d like to kill real-life celebrities. ?On the popular <newgrounds.com> site, kids can visit the Assassin section and view Flash movies showing celebrities being degraded and killed. But on many sites, the crass tone escalates to violence – on sites such <whowouldyoukill.com> ? where users post their thoughts on how they’d like to kill real-life celebrities. ?On the popular <newgrounds.com> site, kids can visit the Assassin section and view Flash movies showing celebrities being degraded and killed.

Slide 42:This culture of cruelty can be perpetrated by young people themselves. Creating and using online polls or voting booths is a popular activity with kids. <freevote.com> allows students to set up instant polls on any subject, such as “Who’s the best looking or most popular boy or girl in the class?” Then their classmates can go on the site and cast their votes. Inevitably, some kids use this technology to post hateful messages about classmates or teachers. Often these sites are password-protected, making it difficult for adults to check the content. This culture of cruelty can be perpetrated by young people themselves.

Slide 43:A Manitoba educator told MNet about a site where students were posting offensive comments. An investigation, however, revealed a refreshing twist – kids were taking their own classmates to task for their behaviour. ? The poll, asking users to choose the ugliest kid at their school, generated censure from students for posting something so “hurtful and mean.” The anonymity of the Internet makes young people feel free to say and do things they might not, normally. It’s important to teach kids that any kind of online bullying is unacceptable. Postings on such sites are not just the equivalent of sending a nasty note around a classroom – these are in the public domain, where anyone can read them. A Manitoba educator told MNet about a site where students were posting offensive comments. An investigation, however, revealed a refreshing twist – kids were taking their own classmates to task for their behaviour.

Fact or Folly Authenticating online information

Slide 44:The ease with which anyone can post comments or information on the Internet means that we all need to develop the critical thinking skills to decide how truthful online information really is. This is especially true for young people; more than 50 per cent of secondary students now turn to the Internet first when doing research for homework. The ease with which anyone can post comments or information on the Internet means that we all need to develop the critical thinking skills to decide how truthful online information really is. This is especially true for young people; more than 50 per cent of secondary students now turn to the Internet first when doing research for homework.

Slide 45:Amount of Internet information believed to be true or trustworthy

s87 Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001 Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001 However, the good news is that almost half of secondary students are smart enough to consider only some of the information they find on the Internet to be trustworthy. Still, 37 per cent believe that they can trust most of the information they find online. However, the good news is that almost half of secondary students are smart enough to consider only some of the information they find on the Internet to be trustworthy. Still, 37 per cent believe that they can trust most of the information they find online.

Confirm that information on Internet is true or trustworthy 67% 27% 6% Yes No dk/na Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001 Young Canadians In A Wired World, June 2001

Slide 46:While young people may be sceptical of some of the content they find online, few go to much trouble to confirm its authenticity. Less than three in ten secondary school students double-check the information they find on the Internet. While young people may be sceptical of some of the content they find online, few go to much trouble to confirm its authenticity. Less than three in ten secondary school students double-check the information they find on the Internet.

Slide 47:Five W’s (and one H) of Cyberspace

Who is the source? What are you getting? When was it created? Where are you? Why are you there? How can you tell good information from bad? A good start in equipping young people to assess Web information is to provide them with the easy-to-remember journalists’ formula: who, what, when, where, why and how. ?Who is the author or creator of this Web page? ?What kind of information are you getting here? ?When was this Web page created? When was it last updated? ?Where are you? Does the address of the site tell you anything? ?Why have you chosen the Internet in the first place? Is there a better place to look? ?How can you tell the junk from the jewels? A good start in equipping young people to assess Web information is to provide them with the easy-to-remember journalists’ formula: who, what, when, where, why and how. ?Who is the author or creator of this Web page? ?What kind of information are you getting here? ?When was this Web page created? When was it last updated? ?Where are you? Does the address of the site tell you anything? ?Why have you chosen the Internet in the first place? Is there a better place to look? ?How can you tell the junk from the jewels?

Slide 48:Verifying the source of information is a crucial first step in separating fact from fiction on the Net. For example, if someone had checked out the source of the material on this site, schoolchildren in the U.S. would not have been told that whales swim in Lake Michigan! According to this site, each year freshwater whales begin a 1,300-mile migration from Hudson Bay to the warmer waters of Lake Michigan, maneuvering through several locks along the way. Verifying the source of information is a crucial first step in separating fact from fiction on the Net. For example, if someone had checked out the source of the material on this site, schoolchildren in the U.S. would not have been told that whales swim in Lake Michigan!

Slide 49:Teachers first learned about this amazing migration story from a Michigan-based educational publication, which had taken the information, at face value, from the Web site. If those publishers had taken the time to verify the information, they would have quickly seen that, despite its professional look, the Michigan Whale Watching site is a hoax. Teachers first learned about this amazing migration story from a Michigan-based educational publication, which had taken the information, at face value, from the Web site. If those publishers had taken the time to verify the information, they would have quickly seen that, despite its professional look, the Michigan Whale Watching site is a hoax.

Slide 50:For example, if they had asked: ? “Who the author is of the page?” they would have discovered that although there is some sketchy contact information, there is no link to an “About Us” section where users could learn more about the creators of the site. ? Or they could have examined the domain name of the Web page. The address reveals that the site is hosted by Geocities, a popular Web hosting company where anybody can put up a personal home page. For example, if they had asked:

Slide 51:They could have checked other sources to compare information: If they visited the official Michigan Travel and Recreation site, for instance, they would have found no information on whale watching. ? This site, one of many dedicated to Great Lakes research and conservancy, contains no reference to whales in its aquatic information. ? And finally, a quick check on the Google Web site, using the search term “Lake Michigan Whale Watching,” reveals several news stories about the hoax. Teaching kids how the Internet works, and how Web sites can be put up with no questions asked, is a good base for healthy scepticism. And training them to use a wide variety of information resources, and to check and question what they see online, is a good start to fostering life-long critical thinking skills. They could have checked other sources to compare information:

Slide 52:Young people are miles ahead of many of us in their technical abilities – and this can be intimidating for parents, educators and other adults who are scrambling to keep up. But it doesn't mean we are irrelevant or powerless. In fact, our involvement is crucial: kids today need adult guidance more than ever. While technological tools, such as filtering and monitoring software, can be useful, they don’t teach kids how to think. Nor do they teach them the concepts about privacy, ethics and responsibility, and how those apply to the Internet. We have to teach kids these things. Young people are miles ahead of many of us in their technical abilities – and this can be intimidating for parents, educators and other adults who are scrambling to keep up. But it doesn't mean we are irrelevant or powerless. In fact, our involvement is crucial: kids today need adult guidance more than ever.

www.media-awareness.ca family online agreements Taking action in the home good kids’ Web sites and safe search engines effective online searching filtering and blocking software protecting personal information online tracking kids’ online activities chat room safety reporting offensive or illegal online content

Slide 53:To help parents, the MNet Web site has a Parents section with in-depth information on many of the topics we’ve discussed today – and tips on managing the Internet in the home – including: ?creating a family online agreement ? finding good kids’ Web sites, directories, portals and search engines ? conducting effective online searches ? using filtering and blocking tools ? protecting personal information in online environments ? tracking where kids have been on the Internet ? protecting children from online predators in chat rooms ? reporting offensive or illegal online content To help parents, the MNet Web site has a Parents section with in-depth information on many of the topics we’ve discussed today – and tips on managing the Internet in the home – including: ?creating a family online agreement ? finding good kids’ Web sites, directories, portals and search engines ? conducting effective online searches ? using filtering and blocking tools ? protecting personal information in online environments ? tracking where kids have been on the Internet ? protecting children from online predators in chat rooms ? reporting offensive or illegal online content

Taking action in your community Organize workshop Form a technology committee Develop an awareness event Educate parents Involve Girl Guides Work with your local library

Slide 54:Making sure that kids have the critical thinking skills to be safe and smart online is not just a parental responsibility. Everyone in your community concerned with the well-being of young people has a role to play. At a community level, you can: ? Organize workshops, like this one, through your church, school or youth organization. ? Set up a school technology committee to promote education on Internet issues. ? Organize an Internet day or week in your school. ? Educate parents by sending information home in school newsletters (you can find parent handouts and tip sheets on the Media Awareness Network Web site). ? Involve local Girl Guide units in the new Guiding badge program for Internet literacy. ? Or, of course, work with your local library to develop Web Awareness programming for parents. Making sure that kids have the critical thinking skills to be safe and smart online is not just a parental responsibility. Everyone in your community concerned with the well-being of young people has a role to play.

Good supervision when kids are young Good communication when kids are older Adult involvement is key

Slide 55:

This workshop has been produced by the Media Awareness Network For more information contact: Media Awareness Network 1-800-896-3342 [email protected]

Slide 56:

Media Awareness Network Sponsors FOUNDING SPONSORS Bell Canada Shaw Communications Inc. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PARTNERS Canadian Heritage • Health Canada Human Resources Development Canada • Industry Canada BENEFACTORS BCE Inc. CanWest Global CTV Inc. CHUM Television GOLD SPONSORS Bell Canada Rogers Cable Inc. AOL Canada Inc. Microsoft Canada CHUM Television SILVER SPONSORS CTV Inc. TELUS BRONZE SPONSORS Craig Media Inc. Canadian Recording Industry Association

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